Desperate banks fall for the 419 advance-fee fraud

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28 Responses to “Desperate banks fall for the 419 advance-fee fraud”

  1. Antinous / Moderator says:

    I’m sure that those foolish bankers will make good their errors out of their own pockets.

    What?  No, really?

    • nixiebunny says:

      This appeared in my inbox today. It may help:

      The United Nations Compensation Commission (UNCC) in affiliation with Federal Bureau Of Investigation In United State Of America has made available a total of $863,725,490.00 to 27 governments and two international organizations for distribution to 370 successful claimants who has being Victims of Internet scam. This payment is made under the third phase of the payment mechanism established by the UNCC Governing Council and the Government Of the United State. The truth behind your delayed payment is that you have been dealing with fraudsters in Nigeria, London etc. And you really need to stop contacting them now else they will rip you dry until you dont have even money to buy food.

      I will happily forward it to the hapless bankers so that they may get their monies back.

  2. MrRocking says:

    I wish there was a word for the pleasure I feel at their misfortune…

    • JProffitt71 says:

      I am more wary of how they are going to ‘socialize’ the loss.

    • niktemadur says:

      There’s skadefryd in Norwegian, skadeglädje in Swedish, vahingonilo in Finnish, and another in German I think, which eludes me at the moment  :-P

      • rationalthought says:

        @MrRocking:disqus
        @niktemadur:disqus

         Schadenfreude: in German (and in English since 1990), though in English it’s not a widely known term.

  3. Lemoutan says:

    These people have jobs? Somebody gives them a salary?

    • Gilbert Wham says:

       Yes. Despite repeated demonstrations that random number generators/toddlers/quite possibly that fuckin’ world cup octopus do fairly evenly on the markets, people do, indeed pay these fuckers. Because we’re all stupider than an octopus.

  4. Conning the con-men. Sweet. If only the loss came out of the pocket of the person responsible, but he’ll probably get a huge bonus, instead.

  5. timquinn says:

    “Mr Jones, can you tell this committee what happened to the 2 billion dollars you were entrusted with?”

    “Well, Mister Senator, you see, there was this email and I . . . “

  6. Jake0748 says:

    Fuckin banks… how do they work? 

  7. mccrum says:

    “Jim, you fell for the 419 scam, so we’re taking away your ability to use e-mail.”

    • That_Anonymous_Coward says:

      *stares*  That would never happen, they are much more likely to sue AOL for allowing the spam to make it to their inbox.

  8. Illudium_Phosdex says:

    DEAR SIR:

    I AM TIMOTHY GEITHNER, SECRETARY TREASURY OF THE UNITED STATES AMERICA.

    I HAVE RECENTLY COME INTO POSSESSION OF SEVEN HUNDRED BILLION DOLLARS MISLAID BY MISTER BENN BERNANKY.

    AM PREPARED TO DELIVER TO YOUR BANK THE SUM OF FIFTY BILLION DOLLARS PROVIDED THAT YOU CAN DEMONSTRATE GOOD FAITH AND COLATERAL.

    PLEASE EMAIL TO TURBOTAXTIMMY@TREAS.USA.GOV.

  9. Hampton Scribbs says:

    The name of this particular con is “The Spanish Prisoner.”

  10. technogeekagain says:

    Y’know, if the banks were forced to start acting like _banks_ again — lending money to people with decent credit at reasonable rates — rather than gambling with the money, we’d all be better off.

    Long past time to re-regulate. Heck, I’ve heard _bankers_ saying that.

  11. MrQuagmire says:

    Too dumb to fail. 

  12. stuck411 says:

    Falling for one of these scams should lead to the immediate take over by the FDIC — no second chances, do not pass go, you just failed.

  13. TheMudshark says:

    Man, those poor bankers never catch a break, do they?

  14. nmcvaugh says:

    Ultimately, these parties have required the targeted institutions to pay, in advance, retention and due diligence fees, as well as other costs.

    There’s the problem (or is it merely a symptom?) – when did due diligence become a commodity?

  15. IronEdithKidd says:

    The premise made me laugh, then I remembered who funds the FDIC and I cried.

  16. BillStewart2012 says:

    The banks that are that desperate have mostly been gambling on derivatives they don’t understand and Credit Default Swaps on securities that are designed not to be understood.  It’s bad enough that many of them were doing mortgages with inadequate down payments during the housing bubble, so that when housing prices declined they put themselves at significant risk.

    With all that, what’s a little 419 fraud on top…

  17. Nagurski says:

    This it totally being run out of a boiler room at Goldman Sachs.

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