A number of news organizations are running "oddly enough" items this week about the hundreds of weird laws that went into effect on January 1, 2013. Among them: Registered sex offenders in Illinois will no longer be allowed to dress up as Santa Claus or the Easter Bunny or give out candy on Halloween. And in California and Illinois, employers will no longer be permitted to demand that employees and job applicants cough up their social networking passwords or non-public online account info. More: USA Today, Gannett, Reuters.

15 Responses to “With the new year, more than 400 weird laws go into effect in the US”

  1. Ian McLoud says:

    The laws cited in this post don’t seem weird at all too me.

    Having once discovered, after the fact, that a Santa Claus at a children’s holiday party was a registered sex offender, recourse would have been nice. “Same-sex couples in Maryland will be able to marry.” doesn’t seem that weird either.

    In fact, most of the laws cited in these three articles seem logical, even if they go against my personal politics…

    • Boundegar says:

      It is really surprising that a man who dresses up as Santa and dandles other peoples’ kids is a sex offender.  Isn’t that how normal guys spend weekends in December?

  2. Rhyolite says:

    “And in California and Illinois, employers will no longer be permitted to demand that employees and job applicants cough up their social networking passwords or non-public online account info.”

    That sounds more common sense than weird.  I hope more states follow.

    • Sagodjur says:

      It’s weird, but sadly not surprising, that it’s even necessary.

    • jackbird says:

      Since sharing your password is an explicit violation of the ToS of those sites, I figured asking prospective employees to breach a prior contract was probably already illegal under existing law. 

  3. samari711 says:

    If by “weird” you mean “It’s weird that these things weren’t already illegal”

  4. arb says:

    The only thing weird about the laws quotes in the summary is that they weren’t in place already. Common sense shouldn’t be considered weird.

  5. TimRowledge says:

    Ah ‘common sense’. So goddam rare it should be considered a super-power

  6. dmc10 says:

    I can’t believe anyone would even work for a company who wants their FB / Twitter / etc account. I’d politely tell them to fuck off. Luckily I work in an industry where I can find work easily enough, so perhaps it’s not a luxury for some. The concept seems ludicrous to me. 

    • Lupus_Yonderboy says:

      I can believe that companies would want the info and I can believe that people would want the job but I just can’t believe that more people don’t lie. I would.

      “OK, now we just need your Facebook login”

      I don’t have one.

      “But what about this one, isn’t that you?”

      Nope, no idea who that is. He sure is good looking, though.

      • bcsizemo says:

        I’m pretty sure every mid 30′s woman I know on FB who has kids could do that.  None of them have a picture of themselves as their profile shot, it’s always of their kids….all of them…always.

  7. John Lussier says:

    I think it is weird that we just got three links to the same boiler-plate article. Sure they had some small rewrites but the same laws were mentioned in each.

  8. jerwin says:

    Sometimes, I think I’d rather have weird laws than the generic ALEC laws pushed by out of state corporations.

    • IronEdithKidd says:

      Count yourself lucky if you live in a state not controlled by Koch-suckers.  Michigan got a full bucket of ALEC laws crammed through the state house in the last two weeks of the year by a collection of term-limited, now unemployed, lame-duck politicians (except the Governerd, he’s still got two more years to inflict damage).    

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