E-waste porn: a tour of Silicon Valley's Weird Stuff Warehouse


Ars Technica has a beautiful, mouth-watering gallery of the stuff for sale at Silicon Valley's Weird Stuff Warehouse, a high-tech surplus store of epic proportion:

"There is a need for a place you can walk around and get parts and older technology—or even newer technology," said Chuck Schuetz, the man behind the Weird Stuff Warehouse. Schuetz runs the store with his brother and his colleague, Dave McDougall. He let Ars take a tour of the place and snap a few photos, so come take a walk through the warehouse with us to check out the "weird stuff." Welcome to where technology goes to retire.

The Weird Stuff Warehouse is where old tech goes to retire [Florence Ion/Ars Technica]

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  1. This place is amazing. You can go and get a couple cheap cables, or spend thousands on vintage tech you didn’t know you needed to have. Location is everything, being near Silicon Valley means all kinds of unusual and otherwise un findable things are packed in amongst the shelves.

  2. Weird Stuff isn’t nearly as good as HSC Electronics.  At HSC you can get vintage luggable computers, vacuum tubes, and random test equipment. At Weird Stuff it’s just old printers and cardboard boxes 10 Base T ethernet hubs and AC adapters.

  3. Perhaps the photos didn’t properly capture the spirit of the place, but all I see is crap.  HP Vectras, old server racks and piles of deprecated cables.  And I’m a total electronics scrap hound.  This reminds me of stuff I’ve had to haul to the dump on numerous occasions.

    Portland used to have this excellent surplus shop called Wacky Willy’s.  You could find industrial control panels, high output gas laser tubes, buckets full of cool knobs/wheels/casters/fasteners, gyroscopes from Vietnam-era missiles, you name it.  I miss that place dearly.

  4. I used to love going to Weird Stuff Warehouse back in the ’90’s and I’m glad they’re still around.  I once dropped off a load of Bernoulli disks that my old employer, a law firm, was throwing out and Weird Stuff said they’d recycle them.  Probably not such a good idea since the disks had not been reformatted and still had lots of legal stuff on them…

  5. Weird Stuff is the Odd Lots or Closeouts of Silicon Valley, a liquidator of left over but valuable in the right hands “stuff”.   It shares a Sunnyvale Cul-de-sac with Fry’s Electronics, which means that you can go to Weird Stuff and pickup of some dubious item, knowing fair well that you can then walk across the street to Fry’s and purchase the tools and parts to repair it.

    I have a love hate relationship with Fry’s for three reasons:  1) Damnd near impossible to get help on the monsterous sales floor.  2) Unless you are on the lookout, you may be purchasing a returned it and could end up having to return it yourself (Arg!) and 3) “The Final Ignominy”, where they insist on comparing your receipt to the contents of your bag, just steps from where you paid for your purchase.

    1. FYI, store security has no true power to detain you or search your belongings, they just like forcing compliance on customers. With me, it usually goes like this ‘Afternoon sir, are you aware you have no legal right to search my bag or detain me if I refuse? Everything is paid for and I would like to get on my way. Have a good day.’ Usually leaves them speechless. 

  6. WSW is merely a small, unregarded blue planet in comparison to the galactic center of awesome junk that is Ed Grothus’ Black Hole in Los Alamos, NM. http://www.blackholesurplus.com/index.html

  7. I used to get wonderful catalogs of surplus and junked electronics…including “Buy it by the pound” sales on barrels of stuff like ICs, gears and motors and such like.

    This is the only part of modern Internet that makes me sad, losing out on those glorious catalogs full of things I had never seen before but suddenly wanted.  :)

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