Boing Boing editor/partner and tech culture journalist Xeni Jardin hosts and produces Boing Boing's in-flight TV channel on Virgin America airlines (#10 on the dial), and writes about living with breast cancer. Diagnosed in 2011. @xeni on Twitter. email: xeni@boingboing.net.

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  1. MisterJayEm

    In Russia, rocket ______ you.
  2. incarnedine_v

    Now that is a nonchalant announcer.

    Couldn't catch the start of that but the rest goes "Something doesn't seem right. Seems like it's going to be a catastrophe. And there goes the rocket plummeting to earth and breaking up in mid air. And it's exploded" in the calmest voice ever.

  3. ACGhost

    The orange stuff is REALLY nasty:

  4. Pluto

    For the first 47 (? or something?) seconds the self destruct mechanisms are not activated in order to not damage the launch complex in the event of a failure. The destruction of a rocket releases an enormous amount of energy, even when using a self destruct mechanism, so using the self destruct mechanism near the ground will result in a lot of damage. Also, some of the rockets self destruct by turning, the rocket will disintegrate because it cannot handle the drag forces when it is flying sideways.

  5. Rhyolite

    Russian rockets don't have destruct systems like western rockets. However, they usually have a mechanism to shut off the engines if they go off course. I didn't see that here. The engines were until the rocket started to disintegrate.

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