Publishing as personal: lessons from giving away a debut novel online

Amelia Beamer writes, "I share what I learned from giving away my debut novel The Loving Dead, and why I think that the publishing industry has become personal. I also speak of an incident involving free bacon."

Beamer raises good points about what authors are really competing for: not reading time, but attention.

I think people choose what books to read the same way we choose friends. The book has to be interesting, and it has to cross your path in a way that gets your attention. It helps if the book comes recommended by someone you trust. There are so many novels out there, and I can’t remember when I last picked up a book based on a book review. I get them all through personal contacts, or chance encounters.

This may go against conventional wisdom, but I don’t think books or even authors are competing against one another. We’re competing for a potential reader’s attention with everything in his or her life. If these potential readers are anything like me, they want the book to be handed to them by a friend. They want reading to be a shared cultural experience, like Harry Potter or Fifty Shades. Most importantly, they want to read stories that speak to their interests.

So my hope is to put my books in front of as many people as possible, so that the books can make friends. Word of mouth is never about promoting a product: it’s about the personal relationship between the person giving the recommendation and the person receiving it. Making the book free is just a way to get more people involved.

The Loving Dead [Amazon]

What I learned from giving away my first novel [Amelia Beamer]

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