Cool sculpture creates moiré pattern when viewed

Constructive Interference is a laser-cut sculpture that demonstrates the "double slit" phenomenon that causes periodic wave patterns. I've posted about the math involved previously.

Constructive Interference is composed of two large patterned sheets of steel, designed to create a rapidly changing visual interference effect as viewers pass by. Secondary moving shapes and hidden structures appear fleetingly within the sculpture as the eye and body pass by. The effect and shape of the piece changes dramatically from one vantage point to another around the space, while the sculpture itself remains static.

The sculpture and its dynamic pattern were developed in Processing, Rhino-Grasshopper, and Python. The rear surface was painted directly on to the wall, using several CNC-vinyl cut masks to create the painted rust pattern. The front surface was fabricated from 20 laser cut pieces of Corten steel, welded together on site and finished to form a single 30 foot wide, 17 foot tall steel sheet. This surface was hand-treated to a rich weathered patina, curving from flush with the wall to a dramatic overhang.

Here's a nice explainer of the physics behind the optical phenomenon:

Constructive Interference (Vimeo / Plebian Design) via Creative Applications

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  1. From XKCD, of course:

  2. Doesn't this cause epilepsy or liberalism? It's clear they don't want to tell us anything except in videos. Doesn't anybody wonder why that might be?

  3. A bunch of clear lines on black moire'd with a bunch of other lines slowly rotating

    A bunch of clear lines on black along roads moire'd with a bunch of junk = car headlights down the road.

  4. It's a moiré interference pattern, but I don't think it has anything to do with the double-slit experiment.

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