Trou: a soft, CCTV-bugged interactive sculpture that you ram your hand and arm into

Trou is an interactive sculpture from Valencia, Spain's Mireia Donat Melús: the nylon and silicon fiber blob invites viewers to don a surgical glove and insert their hands and arms into an elastic orifice in the sculpture's surface -- and watching their probing appendage from within via a live video-feed. Read the rest

Artisan creates beautiful, delicately colored glass sculptures

Slovenian artist Kaja Upelj moved to London for school, where she has been creating interesting experimental glass works with unusual colorations and deliberate occlusions. Read the rest

Watch this colorful mesh sculpture transform a Greek ruin

Juxtaposing bright spray-painted mesh with the ocean vista of a 400-year-old Greek ruin, artistic duo Quintessenz created Kagkatikas Secret. Read the rest

Kinetic sculpture of Franz Kafka's metamorphosing head

David Cerny (previously) created this wonderful kinetic sculpture of Prague's own Franz Kafka. Read the rest

The Strandbeests of 2018 are from the very greatest of timelines

For more than 15 years, we've been writing about the strandbeests, Theo Jansen's incredibly, multilegged windwalking machines that clatter their way along in eerily lifelike fashion (I even wrote them into my fiction). Read the rest

Artist creates enormous colorful sculptures by reusing single-use materials

Anyone who has ever worked on making a parade float knows how time-consuming the process is. Artist Crystal Wagner takes it to the next level with her gigantic amorphous abstract works.

The Bedford Gallery commissions internationally renowned artist Crystal Wagner to create a large-scale, immersive piece that uses the entire gallery. Her colorful, mind-blowing installations are built from ordinary materials—primarily chicken wire and vinyl disposable tablecloths—that appear to grow organically within the gallery.

More on her Instagram:

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Meanwhile in #paris repost @modus.gallery 🙏

A post shared by Crystal Wagner (@artistcrystalwagner) on Aug 3, 2018 at 12:20pm PDT

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Meanwhile @btvcityarts my interior/exterior traverse has had a remarkable number of visitors (14,192) in the first month of its existence 🙏much love to the travelers... local and afar that have journeyed

A post shared by Crystal Wagner (@artistcrystalwagner) on Jul 31, 2018 at 2:37pm PDT

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The beautiful temporary. The material will be recycled and grown into a new pseudoscape. So much love to everyone who made it out to see my #Paradigms exhibition @thecrowncollection #finalmoment #denver

A post shared by Crystal Wagner (@artistcrystalwagner) on Jul 24, 2018 at 9:07am PDT

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Wonderful seeing all the pictures in instaland of my current exhibition #traverse @btvcityarts #regram @aquinsta #thankyou

A post shared by Crystal Wagner (@artistcrystalwagner) on Jul 1, 2018 at 11:24am PDT

Crystal Wagner's FLUX @ The Bedford Gallery (YouTube / City of Walnut Creek) Read the rest

Check out this massive fabric tree installed in the middle of a train station

Zurich's Main Station is currently home to an enormous public artwork: GaiaMotherTree, a huge knotted fabric tree with intimate space underneath where visitors can gather. Read the rest

Frighteningly lifelike clay sculptures

Polina Verbitsaya has gotten quite adept at sculpting polymer clay into weird sculptures, like disturbing people, body parts, and and other visceral gew-gaws. Read the rest

Watch this kinetic chandelier in all its shape-shifting glory

This interactive kinetic chandelier seems like a flower or a sea creature with its graceful waves of syncrhonized movement. Read the rest

Transparent timelapse photos printed and layered

For his Layer Drawings series, artist Nobuhiro Nakanishi photographs the same shot at regular intervals, then prints them on glass and layers them into mesmerizing sculptures. Read the rest

This "restoration" of a 16th century statue at a Spanish church is really... something

In Estella, Spain, a local handicrafts teacher completed this incredible "restoration" of a 500-year-old painted wooden effigy of St. George at a local church. Apparently the parish authorities of the Church of St Michael requested the teacher do the work.

"The parish decided on its own to take action to restore the statue and gave the job to a local handicrafts teacher," Mayor Koldo Leoz told The Guardian. "The council wasn’t told and neither was the regional government of Navarre... It’s not been the kind of restoration that it should have been for this 16th-century statue. They’ve used plaster and the wrong kind of paint and it’s possible that the original layers of paint have been lost.”

At the least, the parish should have hired Cecilia Gimenenz to consult on the restoration. Read the rest

Shiny animal sculptures from Jud Turner

Sculptor Jud Turner (previously) writes, "Been playing with shiny chrome parts in the studio lately (motorcycle parts, mostly) to conjure up things that are currently scaring me: "Stanislav the Russian Boar" and "Hera the Mud Dauber Wasp." Don't worry, I'm using plenty of ventilation and respirator when welding up this toxic but super-fun material. Read the rest

Robert Longo's new sculpture is a Death Star of 40,000 bullet casings

Artist Robert Longo has created Death Star II, a stunning sphere made with a bullet for each gun death in the US. It premiered at Art Basel this week (photos below). Read the rest

Very short films about very small sculptures made from scraps

Lydia Ricci's From Scraps project repurposes bits of refuse into tiny sculptures of objects that have often fallen out of wide use. She also made some very short films with some of the objects: Read the rest

Remarkably detailed tiny sculptures on the tips of pencils

Artist Salavat Fidai creates all sorts of cool art, but his work sculpting the tips of pencils really stands out as an impressive achievement. Read the rest

Watch how to make patterns in cross-sectioned clay

Nerikomi is a classical form of pottery where different colored clays are rolled into cylinders, then cross-sectioned to reveal a pattern. So soothing to watch the string cut through!

Faith Rahill has a great step-by-step demonstration here:

Nerikomi (often referred to as “neriage”) is a decorative process established in Japan that involves stacking colored clay and then slicing through the cross section to reveal a pattern, which can then be used as an applied decoration. Nerikomi designs provide a wonderful way to work three dimensionally with patterns and images. The results reflect a combination of both careful planning and accidental surprise, plus it’s exciting work for those who love patterns and are drawn to the wet-clay stage of pottery making.

Here are a couple more examples with far less annoying music. The agate pottery revealed after firing the glaze is especially nice:

Centuries old pottery gets new layer (YouTube / NHK WORLD-JAPAN) Read the rest

Brutalist cuckoo clocks

German artist Guido Zimmerman's Cuckoo Blocks are an expansion of his project creating cuckoo clocks in the Brutalist style. Read the rest

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