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Biophilia – Photographs that combine artful design with taxidermy and other preservation techniques

Christopher Marley grew up with a freezer stuffed with dead birds. His father, a passionate bird breeder, couldn’t part with the birds when they died, so he stored them alongside the family’s frozen food. Now Marley, also passionate about birds as well as all types of nature, preserves beautiful creatures after they’ve died by combining art and design with taxidermy and other preservation techniques. In his new book Biophilia, which means “love of life,” Marley shares his artfully photographed collections of insects, sea life, reptiles, birds, plants and minerals. From pastel urchins arranged like a tray of meringues to vibrant Charly Harper-style insect collages to stunning portraits of snakes, wasps, rocks, crabs, bird wings and more, Marlow’s work is nothing short of magnificent. Every image in this book is a masterful work of art.

Biophilia
by Christopher Marley
Harry N. Abrams
2015, 288 pages, 10 x 12 x 1.2 inches
$35 Buy a copy on Amazon

See sample pages from this book at Wink.

Print combines all the Haunted Mansion stretch-room gags


Actualchad writes, "An aura of foreboding permeates this community of foolish mortals, as their perils combine into a vexing misfortune of exaggerated proportions!"

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Jackson Pollock has a cookbook and it's delicious

I used to have a bad attitude about Jackson Pollock’s drip paintings. I thought they were junk. Then one day a friend asked me if I’d ever looked at one of Pollock’s paintings in a museum. I hadn’t. He suggested I do and see if my attitude changed. I followed his advice, and after about 5 minutes of staring at the painting and trying not to judge, it won me over. I love Pollock’s paintings now.

Dinner with Pollock is a spiral bound cookbook that combines Pollock’s art with his own recipes. He was an accomplished cook, and especially good at creating tasty dishes from the kind of food typically available during the Great Depression and wartime rationing. Robyn Lea’s photos of Pollock’s borscht, blintzes, johnny cakes, hummus, Long Island clam pie, and dozens of other recipes are mouth watering. It’s another reason to love this amazing person.

See sample pages from this book at Wink.

Dark Chocolate Nuts & Sea Salt Kind bars - yummy and only 5g of sugar

kindbar

When I fly, I either fast or bring along some dark chocolate, macadamia nuts, and bacon jerky. I recently added a new item: Dark Chocolate Nuts & Sea Salt Kind bars. They are delicious and have just 5g of sugar, which is hard to believe. A dozen bars cost $14 on Amazon, and less if you use Subscribe and Save.

Neal Stephenson's Seveneves: five thousand years of apocalypse and rebirth

Neal Stephenson's no stranger to ambition, but his new novel Seveneves stretches to lengths (and heights) that beggar the imagination.Read the rest

Cartoonist Joe Matt's porn problem follows him to Los Angeles

A story from Drawn and Quarterly's new 800-page 25th Anniversary AnthologyRead the rest

Deal: MMOVE Stereo Bluetooth Earbuds for $32

mmove

The MMOVE Stereo Bluetooth Earbuds deliver the latest in premium audio technology and superior comfort, at a price point that wows. The wireless connectivity gives you the freedom of unplugging, with quality that’s sure to surpass your expectations. Fuel your next stroll around the neighborhood, bike ride, workout or marathon — with these lightweight, noise-canceling earbuds pumping your soundtrack, anything is possible.

  • Wear them while you workout thanks to the sweatproof, durable design
  • Keep track of the battery status w/ the on-screen indicator
  • Get maximum comfort w/ a choice of sizes & types of hooks
  • Enjoy clear, isolated sound w/ CVC® 6.0 Noise Reduction
  • Listen for up to 6 hours without recharging
  • Control volume & song choice, take or reject calls & more w/ on-ear controls
  • Connect 2 devices simultaneously, like your MP3 player for music & phone to take calls!

Check out all of the items in the Boing Boing store, including gadgets, software, apps, and online courses!

Han Solo in Carbonite mini-fridge


The $150 glowing LED-decorated peltier fridge can heat or cool your desktop comestibles while allowing you to role-play Jabba. (via Geeky Merch)

Drawn and Quarterly's lavish doorstopper of a book on 25 years of indie comics

It’s hard to imagine what contemporary culture would be like without the existence of the comic, graphic novel, and low-brow art publishers Last Gasp, Fantagraphics, and Canada’s small press darling, Drawn & Quarterly. In Drawn & Quarterly: Twenty-five Years, D&Q are given their due. This lavish doorstopper of a book contains numerous historical essays about the company, with lots of great photos, a timeline, reminiscences, interviews, and more. The rest of the book is mainly comprised of full strips and excerpts from some of the many award-winning and pathbreaking comics and graphic novels that D&Q has published over the past quarter century. Some rarely-seen comics are included. Peppered throughout are appreciation essays from the likes of Jonathan Lethem and Margaret Atwood along with many artists appreciating the fellow creators of the delightful devil’s picture books known as comics. Artists featured in the collection include Seth, Julie Doucet, Chris Ware, Adrian Tomine, Lynda Barry, Chester Brown, Peter Kuper, Tom Gauld, Daniel Clowes, Anders Nilsen, Ariel Bordeaux, and dozens more.

Again, imagine for a minute a world in which the work of these talented artists had never reached the masses, and how far less rich, interesting, and strange our world would be as a result. Congrats to Drawn & Quarterly for bringing these artists to us, for celebrating 25 years of beautiful high weirdness, and for producing this impressive and yummy book. The ink smell of it alone will make a book nerd’s eyes roll back in her head.

See sample pages from this book at Wink.

A Nerf gun you can shoot in the dark

The Nerf N-Strike is one of those “batteries not included” toys, and it takes a screwdriver to get into the battery compartment, but fortunately it takes AA batteries, which are the easiest to find. The dart gun itself functions without batteries; only the targeting light requires batteries to operate. Though the light doesn’t show well at any distance during daylight, in the dim light of evening or in a dark room it shows up crisply between five and ten feet from the target. It’s even possible to 'sight in' the Nerf gun by moving the clear plastic disc in front of the light source, which is a really cool concept for a dart gun.

At first, I thought the N-Strike was disappointing, since the darts didn’t stick well and the light wasn’t very bright, but as I played with it more, it broke right in. The darts flew straighter and stuck to walls, even from a distance of 15 feet, and when the sun was not streaming in my windows, the light, which turns on automatically when the trigger is half-pulled, was much brighter against the walls. This Nerf gun comes with three darts, and it has to be manually loaded each time, which I think is pretty standard for dart guns. Extra dart packs are available inexpensively, manufactured by Nerf and other compatible companies. This is a fun toy, and it would be ideal for a dart war with two or more participants, especially with loads of extra foam darts. – Kitty Lusby

See more photos at Wink Fun.

Star Trek TNG ties


Give Dad the red one: $30, also comes in gold and blue.

Business lessons from "pirates, hackers, gangsters and other informal entrepreneurs"

Amidst all the business books lionizing the likes of Steve Jobs (while minimizing his start as a blue-box peddling criminal) comes The Misfit Economy, a history of the business-practices of "pirates, hackers, gangsters and other informal entrepreneurs."

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Zombie-head string lights


Nothing says garden-party like glowing walker heads dangling over the patio -- $25 for a string of ten heads.

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Chop Sizzle Wow: cookbook / comic mash-up with 50 recipes

The name Chop Sizzle Wow sounds vaguely like a Japanese cooking show, so I was surprised to discover that this delightful cookery and comix mash-up is actually derived from a classic 1950 Italian cookbook called Il Cucchiaio d’Argento, or The Silver Spoon. That grand work had 2,000 recipes, boiled down here to a svelte “50 step-by-step kitchen adventures.”

This large-format cookbook is categorized into the usual suspects: appetizers, pasta, main courses, and desserts & baking. But the main difference from most cookbooks is that each recipe is presented in a page or two of sequential art. It’s Mario Batali for the Marvel and DC crowd – or for anyone who learns best from visual aids. The illustrations, though, are less superhero and more quaintly utilitarian. These aren’t the gorgeously rendered drawings in Cooks Illustrated, but they do the trick and fit the format. Aside from the occasional size relativity issue, it’s quite clear what each of the illustrations is portraying, and they make it easy to envision the dish from start to finish. In an age of effortless photography, one has to marvel at the time taken to put each of these little drawings on paper.

The recipes are quite basic as well. Each set of ingredients is depicted at the top of the page and is a good reminder that tasty, wholesome food can be made with few ingredients and basic methods. There’s no molecular gastronomy here to scare off the kitchen first-timers. Kids will no doubt enjoy learning with this book, and the slick splatter-resistant cover will keep the book looking good when they do. Further informational gems reside in the introduction and the back of the book: recipe notes, techniques in detail, glossary, index, and menu ideas. Will you like this book as much as I do? I cannoli hope so. – Aaron Downey

See sample pages from this book at Wink.

Poverty is a tax on cognition

In an outstanding lecture at the London School of Economics, Macarthur "genius award" recipient Sendhil Mullainathan explains his research on the psychology of scarcity, a subject that he's also written an excellent book about.

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3D printed precious metal science jewelry that benefits open science curriculum

Luk Cox Idoya Lahortiga, AKA Somersault 18:24, are jewelers who makes 3D printed science objects in gold, brass and silver, like the Darwinian phylogenetic tree necklace pictured above, and invests the profits in freely usable and shareable science education resources.

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The Awesome: ass-kicking girl monster-hunter FTW!

Eva Darrows's debut novel The Awesome features the most sarcastic, raunchiest, bad-ass-est heroine in recent YA history -- monster hunting has never been so outrageous.Read the rest