Intestine socks


Intestine socks! $11/pair (there's also lined notepaper versions for the squeamish), fits men's 9-12/women's 10.5-13. (via Canopy)

Cast metal Lego brick charm


They're $20 from Thinkgeek, and are made of a "silvertone metal alloy," whatever that is.

Stormtrooper with hairbow earrings


Etsy seller Bunnie Buns made these Stormtrooper Bow Earrings, which are cute as heck.

(via Geeky Merch)

Multi-layered, laser-cut art and jewelry


Mtomsky's laser-cut art runs a gamut, from sweet, modest brooches like the $20.70 woodland squirrel to larger, more ambitious sculptural pieces from the wonderful mounted fish ($290); to massive spectacular pieces like the Warm Welcome ($580) and the hugely ambitious Deep Slumber ($4041).

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D20 serving-bowl set


The two halves of the bowl snap together to make a giant D20 (saving throw up, of course), and then snap apart to form a pair of dishwasher/ microwave-safe serving bowls -- $13 from Thinkgeek.

Kickstarting Skyliner; a graphic novel memoir about jazz behind the Iron Curtain


At 81, Polish illustrator Andre Krayewski has adapted his memoir about being a jazz fan in Stalinist Poland into a graphic novel, and his son Ed has translated it to English.

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Seconds, by Bryan Lee "Scott Pilgrim" O'Malley

What do you do for a followup after a triumph like the Scott Pilgrim series? If you’re Bryan Lee O’Malley, you do Seconds, a graphic novel that’s three notches less self-consciously clever, and six notches more heartfelt, smart, and sweet. Cory Doctorow reviews Seconds.

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Kickstarting A is for Zebra, subversive alphabets by Crap Hound's Sean Tejaratchi


It's a twisted, genius alphabet book in the style of Tejaratchi's (more) wonderful found-art collage zine Crap Hound, and published by the brilliant Portland zine store Reading Frenzy; $20 gets you your own copy.

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Steven Gould's "Exo," a Jumper novel by way of Heinlein's "Have Spacesuit, Will Travel"

Steven Gould’s 1993 YA novel Jumper was a spectacular success (even if the film “adaptation” stank on ice), and each of the (all-too-infrequent) sequels have raised both the stakes and the bar for a must-read series. But with Exo, published today, Gould takes his game into orbit — literally.

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Starred review in Kirkus for INFORMATION DOESN'T WANT TO BE FREE, Cory's next book


My next book, Information Doesn’t Want to Be Free, comes out in November, but the reviews have just started to come in. Kirkus gave it a stellar review. Many thanks to @neilhimself and @amandapalmer for their wonderful introductions!

In his best-selling novel Ready Player One, Ernest Cline predicted that decades from now, Doctorow (Homeland, 2013, etc.) should share the presidency of the Internet with actor Wil Wheaton. Consider this manifesto to be Doctorow’s qualifications for the job.

The author provides a guide to the operation of the Internet that not only makes sense, but is also written for general readers. Using straightforward language and clear analogies, Doctorow breaks down the complex issues and tangled arguments surrounding technology, commerce, copyright, intellectual property, crowd funding, privacy and value—not to mention the tricky situation of becoming “Internet Famous.” Following a characteristically thoughtful introduction by novelist Neil Gaiman, rock star Amanda Palmer offers a blunt summary of today’s world: “We are a new generation of artists, makers, supporters, and consumers who believe that the old system through which we exchanged content and money is dead. Not dying: dead.” So the primary thesis of the book becomes a question of, where do we go from here? Identifying the Web’s constituents as creators, investors, intermediaries and audiences is just the first smart move. Doctorow also files his forthright, tactically savvy arguments under three “laws,” the most important of which has been well-broadcast: “Any time someone puts a lock on something that belongs to you and won’t give you the key, that lock isn’t there for your benefit.”

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In the Interests of Safety: using evidence to beat back security theater

“Health and Safety” is the all-purpose excuse for any stupid, bureaucratic, humiliating rubbish that officialdom wants to shove down our throats. In the Interests of Safety, from Tracey Brown and Michael Hanlon, is the antidote: an expert dismantling of bad risk-analysis and a call-to-arms to do something about it, fighting superstition and silliness with evidence.

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Nosferatu's hand belt buckle


Nosferatu's Hand Belt Buckle ($85) -- for when you want people to think of the withered, wrinkled appendages of the ancient undead while looking at your beltular region.

More ugly Christmas sweaters: Satan, Krampus, zombie Santa, D20 -- plus: RUGS!


It's been a year since we featured the amazing, Satan-and-sasquatch themed Christmas sweaters at Middle of Beyond, and they've brought out their new line, which includes a 2D tiger-skin rug, Shining runners, a D20 rug, D20 sweaters, Satanic cardigans, zombie Santa sweaters and so much more. I know what everyone's getting for Krampusmas this year!

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Sonic screwdriver pizza cutter


It talks, too! £10 from Forbidden Planet. (via Geekymerch)

The ineffable joy of transforming boring scientific explanations into exciting comics

Cartooning entomologist Jay Hosler‘s forthcoming young adult graphic novel Last of the Sandwalkers masterfully combines storytelling with science; in this essay, he explains how beautifully comics play into the public understanding of science — and why that understanding is a matter of urgency for all of us.

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