Nova Scotia artist generates furious noise from hand-made sound machines

Artist Rebecca Baxter of Halifax, Nova Scotia makes noisy, grating, often ethereal sounds from machines she designs and solders herself. Demand has been high for her one-offs, including those used in recordings and performances by Flaming Lips, Electric Wurms, New Fumes, Mike O'Neill, Panos, METEOROID, Holy Fuck, Buck 65, and Oscillator Sunshine Machine.

Now she's launched a campaign to raise money to build more sophisticated handmade instruments. So far her devices have been stand-alone, creating sound from oscillators inside, but her next model, the Omega, is slated to have inputs for a guitar or keyboard. More videos: 1, 2, 3. Read the rest

DIY wood/leather box perfect for taming household electronics clutter

I'm a firm believer in a household repository for sundry electronic parts, adapters, and bits of wire. Everyone needs an attractive kitchen basket/box to reduce detritus.

Pretty much the best looking receptacle for this purpose is this wood and leather number made by woodworker David Waelder. The only thing it's missing is a wireless charger installed in the lid. He tells you how it's done in this video from February 23:

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Schools with makerspaces rule. This librarian tells you how build them.

Renowned expert on makerspaces in school libraries, Laura Fleming, has written a great post about her experience embracing serendipity with curious students. In her class, she passed out some brain-computer-interface gadgets and let kids come up with their own applications. The results were surprising. One student is developing his own technology to help an autistic sibling communicate better.

Fleming's book comes out this month, called Best Practices for Establishing a Makerspace for Your School. It sounds a little too educator-focused for me, but it's likely a must-have for anyone involved in high-school STEM.

My favorite passage in Fleming's post is about the role of serendipity in making, and seems to get at a lightening-in-a-bottle quality that fires all good invention:

Serendipity is quickly becoming an important component in establishing a vibrant maker culture. As creative producers, students can take an experimental path to solving problems or creating things [without] an imposed curriculum or the pressure of satisfying someone else’s preconceived objectives, but instead influenced by personal goals and interests.

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Ideas for better custom cookie cutters

For a friend's birthday last night, we made cookies (below) using a custom cookie cutter we bought from an online service. They came out well, but I ended up wanting more control over the process.

Next time, I'll use Cookie Caster, the free service that lets users make their own cookie cutters and download the digital files to their own 3D printer. Most everyone can scare up a 3D printer these days, either from a friend or at school. Doing it ourselves would have given us the chance to iterate on the baked good until it looked perfect. Owning more of the process, we could have done two cutters and experimented in final dough form.

Cookie Caster is a free service (it doesn't offer cookie cutters, only digital files). It launched last fall, and it grew out of the Noisebridge hacker space in San Francisco. You can also create cookie cutters by uploading your own image and tracing around it:

To make the multiple cookie cutters needed to create versions of these cookies from Fancy Flours (below), you might need something like Autodesk 123D Make or improvise your own slices. Not sure if Cookie Caster could help envision a 3D cookie like this. Read the rest

Snail and slug tape is great for electronics projects

Whether you're trying to quiet the hum on your old single coil Strat or Telecaster, or create a DIY wireless charging station for your phone, the copper tape sold to repel pests from the garden is an inexpensive and easy-to-manipulate material for the job.

By the way, slugs actually do HATE copper tape, evidenced by a 2004 paper ("Behavioural response of slugs and snails to novel molluscicides, irritants and repellents") in which scientists placed snails and slugs in little time trails. Citing a slowed pace of .5 centimeters per minute, they concluded that the "copper significantly reduced the velocity of snails."

Apparently the whole copper-slug thing is an urgent question to some people. I admire this guy's testing setup: Read the rest

Kids send Maker projects to space

If the whole Potter franchise didn't already seem to give UK kids special powers, now this: primary and secondary schoolers can enter a contest by April 5 to program a Raspberry Pi for the International Space Station. Astronauts will upload kids' software to the newest credit-card-sized $35 computer for projects. That happens in November.

Meanwhile, I'm trying to think of a way to pass as a high school kid and also use the gyroscope, magnetometer, temperature probe, and infrared cameras on the Pi to do something cool 300 miles over the planet. Read the rest

WATCH: Glassmaster Paul Stankard on glassblowing artistry


Paul Stankard's impossibly beautiful handblown glass pieces look impossible to create. In Beauty Beyond Nature, he discusses the craft while working in his studio. Read the rest

Motorcycle models from watch parts

Artist Dan Tanenbaum makes fantastic motorcycle models out of vintage watch parts. Video below! Read the rest

Friday the 13th skull-spoons

The Jason Voorhees/Friday the 13th spoons from Black Death 777 are $37 each, made from recycled old silverware. (via Oh Gizmo) Read the rest

WATCH: Glowy Zoey's 2014 LED costume is Minnie Mouse

Royce Hutain of returns after last year's hit costume for daughter Zoey. This year's rainbow LED and Velcro homage to Minnie Mouse includes instructions on making your own. Read the rest

LEDs on pentagonal tiles for creating dynamic light sculptures

Matt Mets has a Kickstarter for something he calls BlinkyTile.

It's a fun little set of pentagonal LED circuit board tiles that you can solder together to make geometric shapes, and then program to make dazzling light shows. It's unique because the LEDs are all connected in parallel, but each one has it's own address, so you can make any kind of structural topology and still control each light individually. I would of course appreciate any attention I could get for it!

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Video: maker of incredible working model engines

Retired naval mechanic José Manuel Hermo Barreiro makes incredibly intricate models of engines like the V-12. (via Devour) Read the rest

Adam Savage, muscle man!

BB pal Adam Savage of Mythbusters is very proud of his incredible new muscle suit! Check out those guns and boulders! Read the rest

Video: circuit bending pioneer Reed Ghazala

In the studio with Reed Ghazala, "the father of circuit bending." Read the rest

Vinyl record recycled into lamp

Sandman "up cycled" a vinyl record and camera tripod into a neat studio lamp! (via Laughing Squid) Read the rest

DIY X-Men: Pyro flamethrowers

Colin Furze, who made the amazing DIY Wolverine claws, continues his X-Men experimentation with wristworn Pyro flamethrowers; demo above, how-to video below (via Laughing Squid).

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$5 programmable chemistry set inspired by music box

Stanford bioengineer Manu Prakash and his colleagues devised a $5 "chemistry set" that can be programmed to mix various reactants by punching holes in a paper tape and feeding it through the handheld device. Prakash says he was inspired by a hand-cranked music box. This latest device for what Prakash calls "frugal science" is on the heels of his amazing 50-cent folding microscope that I blogged previously.

"Music box inspires a chemistry set for kids and scientists in developing countries" (SCOPE) Read the rest

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