RIP, science fiction writer Vonda N McIntyre

Vonda N McIntyre, author of the Hugo/Nebula/Locus-winning 1979 novel Dreamsnake, founder of the Clarion West Workshop, and icon of science fiction, has died of pancreatic cancer. She was 70. Vonda and I never really met, but we were on BBSes together in the 1980s and I later taught the Clarion West workshop she founded, and she has always been a significant presence in the field.

Vonda was a stalwart of both the Seattle science fiction scene and the world of feminist science fiction and was a dear friend to people I really care about in both worlds; I want to extend my most sincere condolences to all of them, and to her family.

There will be a memorial in Seattle with details to come. Vonda requested that "in lieu of flowers, people make memorial donations to one of their favorite charities."

Here's some of her File 770 obit, by Tom Whitmore:

McIntyre wrote novels, short stories and media tie-in books, edited a groundbreaking anthology of feminist SF, and founded the Clarion West Writing Workshop. She won the Hugo, Nebula and Locus awards for her 1979 novel Dreamsnake, and won the Nebula again for her 1996 novel The Moon and the Sun. Her short stories were also nominated for awards. In media fiction, she will probably be most remembered as the author who gave Ensign Sulu a first name (Hikaru) in her Star Trek novel The Entropy Effect: that name was later written into one of the Star Trek films. With Susan Janice Anderson, McIntyre edited one of the first feminist science fiction anthologies (Aurora: Beyond Equality, 1976).