Red Star Tales: A Century of Russian and Soviet Science Fiction

Russian science fiction is rarely cheerful or upbeat, but if you want to read some fantastic dystopian futures, Red Star Tales is the collection for you. Read the rest

Read: "Communist Party": the first chapter of Walkaway

There's still time to pre-order your signed first-edition hardcover of Walkaway, my novel which comes out on April 25 (US/UK), and while you're waiting for that to ship, here's chapter one of the novel, "Communist Party" (this is read by Wil Wheaton on the audiobook, where he is joined by such readers as Amanda Palmer and Amber Benson!). Read the rest

Here's the schedule for my 25-city US-Canada Walkaway tour!

There's 25 stops in all on the US/Canada tour for WALKAWAY, my next novel, an "optimistic disaster novel" that comes out on April 25 (more stops coming soon, as well as publication of my UK tour). Read the rest

Bruce Sterling's SXSW 2017 keynote: what should humans do?

Every year, Bruce Sterling closes the SXSW Interactive Festival with a wide-ranging, hour-long speech about the state of the nation: the format is 20 minutes' worth of riffing on current affairs, and then 40 minutes of main thesis, scorchingly delivered, with insights, rage, inspiration and calls to action. Read the rest

New York 2140: Kim Stanley Robinson dreams vivid about weathering climate crisis

In 2012, Kim Stanley Robinson published 2312, imagining how the world and its neighbors might look in 300 years, loosely coupled with the seminal Red Mars books, a futuristically pastoral novel about the way that technology can celebrate the glories of nature; in 2015, Robinson followed it up with Aurora, the best book I read that year, which used 2312's futures to demolish the idea that we can treat space colonization (and other muscular technological projects) as Plan B for climate change -- a belief that is very comforting to those who don't or can't imagine transforming capitalism into a political system that doesn't demolish the planet. Now, with New York 2140, Robinson starts to connect the dots between these different futures with a bold, exhilarating story of life in a permanent climate crisis, where most people come together in adversity, but where a small rump of greedy, powerful people get in their way.

Watch the short film adaptation of William Gibson's "The Gernsback Continuum"

NSFW: Tomorrow Calling (1993) is a short film adaptation for television of William Gibson's 1981 short story "The Gernsback Continuum," from the seminal cyberpunk anthology Mirrorshades (1986), edited by Bruce Sterling, and Gibson's own Burning Chrome (1986) collection. Directed by Tim Leandro, Tomorrow Calling was first shown on Channel 4 in the UK.

Read the rest

What's the difference between a CEO and a president?

Christopher Brown is a gonzo cyberpunk writer who delves into the real-world story of Saddam Hussein's Frank Frazetta collection, but by day he's a high-powered lawyer who's worked in government and the private sector (it's the intersection of these two Browns that penned his outstanding, forthcoming debut novel, Tropic of Kansas, which you should pre-order right now). Read the rest

In defense of left-wing space utopias

Brianna Rennix wants to know why the major current in "space utopianism" is right wing -- Elon Musk floating a "creepy private colony on Mars for ultra-rich survivalists who can shell out $200,000 for their spot" and punched Nazi Richard Spencer bloviating, "We weren’t put on this earth to be nice to minorities, or to be a multiculti fun nation. Why are we not exploring Jupiter at this moment? Why are we trying to equalize black and white test scores? I think our destiny is in the stars. Why aren’t we trying for the stars?" Read the rest

San Franciscans: see Peter S. Beagle & Effie Seiberg at this Saturday's SF in SF

Coming to the American Bookbinders Museum this Saturday: Last Unicorn author Peter S Beagle and up-and-coming prolific short story writer Effie Seiberg, in conversation with Terry Bisson: tickets are $10, bring cash for the bar and the bookseller! Read the rest

The exploration and expansion of gender: the 2016 Tiptree Awards for fantasy and science fiction

The 2016 winners of the James Tiptree, Jr. Literary Award have been announced, top honors went to When the Moon was Ours by Anna-Marie McLemore, with further honors going to some of my favorite books of 2016: Seanan McGuire's Every Heart a Doorway, Ada Palmer's Too Like the Lightning, and Charlie Jane Anders' All the Birds in the Sky. Read the rest

Nevertheless, She Persisted: Tor.com's Women's Day flash fiction sf anthology

Celebrate International Women's Day in stfnal style with Nevertheless She Persisted, a free anthology of original flash fiction by some of science fiction's leading women voices, from Catherynne M. Valente to Amal El-Mohtar to Jo Walton to Nisi Shawl to Charlie Jane Anders to Seanan McGuire to Alyssa Wong to Kameron Hurley -- and more! Read the rest

What will the 25th century call the 21st century?

Polymath historian-novelist Ada Palmer has just published Seven Surrenders, the long-awaited sequel to her astounding debut novel Too Like the Lightning, in which she continues to spin tales in an intricately devised, wonderfully original 25th century. Read the rest

FutureCNN creator offers an ad from the future

Daniel Solé is the creator of @FutureCNN, an icily satirical Twitter account that depicts CNN freeze-frames from a few months in the Trumpian future.

In his new video, all the soulstring-tugging marketing techniques AirBNB put to use in its anti-Trump superbowl ad are recast in the same way: the same voice, but addressing the direr straits of an indefinite but imminent tomorrow.

There's a weird power to it. Like @FutureCNN's chyrons, which ridicule both Trump's grossness and CNN's inanity, this targets two things: Trump's grossness and the glassy manipulations of advertising. The satirical notes are exactly the sort of thing that a marketing agency would deploy to leaven an ad trading in holocaust imagery to appeal to its progressive market (albeit taken to a mocking extreme.)

That said, the implication that startups will remain liberal-oriented is at least optimistic! I, however, anticipate a future where these ostensibly progressive tech companies flip their script without dropping their smile. Same voice but new values, with the proverbial unannounced floorboard inspections buried in the small print.

"Ads from the future" is just my cup of tea. Read the rest

Makers: enter the Share Festival's ARTMAKER Prize competition for sincere electronic art

An all-star jury composed of Arduino inventor Massimo Canzi, Arthur C Clarke Center director Sheldon Brown, tech artist Motor Comino, activist Jasmina Tesanovic and OG Cyberpunk Bruce Sterling are judging the Artmaker prize for the tenth annual Share Festival: this year's theme is "Sincerity" and the prize goes to "art works with the virtues of lucidity, honesty and clarity. Our theme for 2017 asks for self-evident truth and heartfelt emotion, and scorns all slyness, demagoguery and deceit." Read the rest

Fill Your Boots: my column on how technology could let us work like artisans and live like kings

My latest Locus column is "Fill Your Boots," in which I talk about how scientists, sf writers, economists and environmental activists have wrestled with the question of abundance -- how the "green left" transformed left wing politics from the promise of every peasant living like a lord to the promise of every lord living like a peasant. Read the rest

New Yorkers! Come see Edward Snowden and me onstage at the NYPL on the Walkaway tour!

I'm touring 20 US cities (plus dates in Canada and the UK!) with my forthcoming novel Walkaway; the full tour hasn't been announced yet, but I'm delighted to reveal that the NYC stop on May 3 will be at the New York Public Library, where my interlocutor will be the whistleblower Edward Snowden. Tickets are $10-25! (Reminder: there are also signed first-edition hardcovers available for pre-order in the USA and UK). Read the rest

Fireside Fiction is back: The Resistance meets science fiction

Pablo Defendini writes, "Fireside Magazine has just relaunched their website, with a focus on fiction for the resistance. Their latest short story, Andrea Phillips' The Revolution Brought to You by Nike, tells the story of what happens when a corporation turns its brand marketing into a tool for societal change. In light of the actual Nike's recent TV spots celebrating Arab female athletes, Andrea's story reads more like near-future prognosticating, rather than speculative fiction." Read the rest

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