Impossible Penrose Triangle as a 3D printed object -- UPDATED

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13 Responses to “Impossible Penrose Triangle as a 3D printed object -- UPDATED”

  1. Methusedalot says:

    Now this is a wonderful example of bespoke makery.

  2. Anonymous says:

    A new, entirely original version has been uploaded here:
    http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:6513

    It is fundamentally different to both the main design in question as well as artur’s model.

  3. Anonymous says:

    Not really convincing. My first impression was one of open 3sided boxes, not one of closed cubes, because the perspective of the outer edges of those “cubes” isn’t right. The object could be corrected for that, but only for one point of view.

  4. davr says:

    What an ass. He is now claiming copyright on the shape, and threatening anybody who posts it online:

    http://blog.thingiverse.com/2011/02/18/copyright-and-intellectual-property-policy/

  5. davr says:

    Step 1: Make interesting optical illusion
    Step 2: Challenge people to figure it out
    Step 3: Threaten anyone who solves it
    Step 4: …
    Step 5: Profit?

  6. Anonymous says:

    The first person known to design this “solution” for the Penrose triangle was Swedish artist Oscar Reutersvärd, as early as in the 1930´s. There are a few other “solutions” as well.

  7. joris says:

    Francis Tabary created a 3D version of the Penrose triangle in 2004
    http://www.francistabary.com/index.php?menu=detail_impossible&num=20

  8. Anonymous says:

    @trompevenlo, the copyright troll: If you want to claim rights as the “inventor”, you should have registered a design patent. Tough shit that you didn’t. You can’t claim copyright over an idea or a solution to a problem. If you claim to have found a “solution” – and I’m not buying into this marketing idiocy because I know what “mathematically impossible” means – then such a solution would be purely functional and not protectable. Again, to steal solutions from problems out of the public domain and lock them up as IP, you need a patent.

  9. duann says:

    Oscar Reutersvärd never made a version in 3D so Ulrich really was the first to do this. Obviously based on a classic design. All later versions are based on Ulrich’s realization. They may not be ‘direct copies’ but they are intellectually based on his innovation.

    http://www.shapeways.com/blog/archives/747-IP,-3D-Printing-DMCA.html

  10. trompevenlo says:

    Yes, Artur (sort of) figured it out from our original design, the actual print that we made and the published pictures.

    I am a little disappointed to see him noted as the inventor.

  11. duann says:

    Looks like Artur may have figured it out..

    Here is the original Impossible triangle 5″ – 12 cm by trompevenlo
    http://www.shapeways.com/model/206411/impossible_triangle_5____12_cm.html?gid=cg14

    and a cool video of one that is actually 3D printed and held by a human (we think)

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