Flying robot makes 3D map of building's interior

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12 Responses to “Flying robot makes 3D map of building's interior”

  1. eviladrian says:

    But the guy running it still manages to get lost within 15 minutes!

    • bcsizemo says:

      But, but…

      I thought I had a reasonable explanation but it kind of feel apart when you realize they communicate with the captain in the middle of the storm.

      But boy, those were some nifty special effects.

    • Sigmund_Jung says:

      That’s a movie you hate a little bit more every day. Damn you Lindelof (and Scott for being a pussy)

  2. JPW says:

    Wouldn’t a blimp be somewhat more, um, discreet?

  3. GawdDamb says:

    Interesting. I can’t think of a practical purpose for it off the top of my head. It’s not stealthy. Usually you can get layouts of buildings from city planning ect. ect. Maybe if you had to map an underground tunnel system? hm

    • ackpht says:

       Lots of applications, particularly if the device can be further miniaturized and quieted in the future, which is a pretty good bet. Two big trends in military tech development are tools for urban warfare and precision-guided (as in: under 1  meter targeting error) weapons that enable the use of the smaller warheads that loitering UAVs can carry. Locate the specific room  that the baddies are in, and if there’s an exterior window, that’s where you put the laser designator. If there are no windows, just knowing the specific XYZ coordinates will assist in selecting and targeting the appropriate weapon.

      A sufficiently small device, upon encountering a closed door, can just park unobserved and wait for it to open. Accumulating a map of the building interior/contents over time, it can then fly to a relay point to offload the data.

      Even if you’re not bird-dogging for a Reaper, I can see these being very useful for law enforcement and emergency response.

    • cfuse says:

      3D data for Google maps to building level including interiors for the entire world.

    • Mick Maus says:

      As the two commenters under you have noted, the main uses are google continuing it’s massive spy campaign and obvious military applications. So, I ask again, ‘Is there a practical [not-bad-for-humans] application for this?’

  4. SoItBegins says:

    Looks like tomorrow’s hottest piece of security tech is going to be the butterfly net.

  5. TimmoWarner says:

    Speak up!

  6. Lemoutan says:

    Now we await the movie where the plot device for the escapade is fooling the mapping drone with a simulated alternate environment.

  7. David Carroll says:

    I’m ashamed to say my first thought was: This would be perfect for shooting LipDub videos.  ;(

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