Edwardians doing bike tricks


The Guardian commemorates the reissue of Isabel Marks's 1901 classic "Fancy Cycling" by publishing a sweet gallery of Edwardian ladies and gents doing bike tricks: "Marvel as these tailored tricksters demonstrate how to pick up a handkerchief without dismounting, ride backwards while seated on the handlebar, and 'tilting at the ring'"

(Thanks, Jonathan!)

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    1.   The link has been there since I first read the article, it is the “Thanks” of the “Thanks, Jonathan” text. Although I admit it violates the basic tenet of HTML that the text of the link should indicate what is being linked too.

      1. Cory, you can do better than that – use a URL shortener to obscure the eventual destination, make the link text “NSFW”, force it to display as black text on a white background, and add a spurious “warning: huge PDF”

  1. I see that Vitalstatistix has updated his mode of transportation, but held onto the shield carriers.

      1.  you replied while i was typing out my reply to say the same thing–weird.

        if she was going to feign interest in something to imply nonchalance about the trick, I’d have gone for a book or something.  i get that a lamp is more cycling-related, but they’re hardly as interesting as she’s acting.

    1.  I’m thinking it’s a headlamp maybe, but why she would be scrutinizing it during the trick I can’t fathom.

      here’s some stuff I’ve saved over the years:

      1. why she would be scrutinizing it during the trick I can’t fathom

        Caption says that she’s lighting it. I’ve never lit a carbide lamp, but I imagine it’s quite fiddly.

        Here’s one of my favourites:

        1.  Yeah, If I was lighting an acetylene-powered lamp, damn right I’d be paying it some serious attention…

        2.  whelp.  that’ll teach me to not read the captions.  i had my browser zoomed in and didn’t look for them.  and lighting a carbide lamp is fiddly.

          cool pic–fuckin’ saved!

    1.  The link has been there since I first read it, it is the “Thanks, Jonathan” text. Although I admit it violates the basic tenet of HTML that the text of the link should indicate what is being linked too.

  2. How do copyright a book from 1901? Wouldn’t this be in the public domain by now, or do I continue to blame Disney?

  3. Does anyone know when pneumatic tires came into common use?  They were invented in 1887, but I don’t know whether most of these cyclists photographed in the years leading up to 1901 would have been on solid or inflated tires.

    1. These are all pneumatic tires, although many of them are seriously under-inflated. I assume that pneumatic tires would have caught on quickly, given their dramatic ride improvement.

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