Rare 'Honey Moon' tonight. Turn away from the internet long enough to enjoy it.

Image: Robert Arn, for NASA.


Image: Robert Arn, for NASA.

Friday the 13th, 2014: A rare "honey moon" in the sky. June’s full moon is known by that name because of all the full moons each year, it is most likely to give off an amber glow.

David Dickinson at Universe Today:

What we’re seeing here is merely the intersection of three cycles of events… and nothing more. These sorts of things can be fun to calculate and can provide a teachable moment, even when that well meaning but often misinformed relative/coworker/stranger on Twitter sends it your way . Hey, some people golf or collect steel pennies, this is our shtick.

A “Friday the 13th Honey Moon” is basically the subset of: 1. Fridays that fall on the 13th day of the month (OK, that’s two input perimeters, we know) that also 2. Fall in the month of June, and 3. Occur on a Full Moon. Friday the 13th occurs from one to three times a calendar year, so you can already see that one will occasionally happen to land on a Full Moon date fairly frequently… but how ‘bout in June?

Chart via Universe Today


Chart via Universe Today