Grey Gersten's beautiful music video featuring space imagery from Cassini

Grey Gersten, whose work lies at the intersection of avant-garde art, multimedia, and music, has released this interplanetary video for his track "Press Your Heart Against The Screen," from his new album Naked Light out today. The song, about the bridge between humans and machines, is complemented by stunning images captured by NASA's Cassini space probe in 2009. Gersten has explored space in his prior work as well, having composed the soundtrack to Tom Sachs' incredible film A Space Program about the installation artist's Space Program 2.0: MARS project. A force in New York City's experimental art scene, Gersten has collaborated with John Zorn and TV on The Radio, and counts Laurie Anderson as a fan.

Starting at sunset tonight at NYC's 537 Broadway gallery, Gersten is hosting an overnight performance experience with special guests, meditation, experimental films, and a dramatic reading of former FBI Director James Comey's Congress Hearing.

Far fucking out.

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The true color of Saturn's north pole is a stunning blue

Astroparticle physicist Sophia Nasr posted a gorgeous photo of Saturn's north pole, processed to account for a luminance layer. Instead of a reddish hue, it is a breathtaking cerulean blue. Jason Major replicated the results. Read the rest

Saturn's weird "Flying Saucer" moon

Saturn's moon Atlas is said to look like a flying saucer. The Cassini probe took a close look on its way to Titan, whizzing 7,000km from the tiny world. To me it looks like one of those soft, dusty banana-flavored chews you get in the very cheapest candy bags.

These raw, unprocessed images of Saturn's moon, Atlas, were taken on April 12, 2017, by NASA's Cassini spacecraft. The flyby had a close-approach distance of about 7,000 miles (11,000 kilometers). These images are the closest ever taken of Atlas and will help to characterize its shape and geology. Atlas (19 miles, or 30 kilometers across) orbits Saturn just outside the A ring -- the outermost of the planet's bright, main rings.

Here's the full animation, from NASA: Read the rest

Breathtaking space film on Cassini's final months exploring Saturn

NASA's JPL is counting down the days to the scheduled end of Cassini's mission in September. Erik Wernquist created this awe-inspiring overview of Cassini's final months of existence.

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Saturn's hexagonal pole storm revealed in new Cassini probe shots

Having settled into orbit around Saturn, the Cassini probe has begun returning new images of the gas giant. The BBC reports that it will be "making a series of daredevil maneuvers" in the coming months, risking doom near Saturn's moons to get better shots of them and the rings.

Cassini began what are known as its ring-grazing orbits on 30 November. Each of these week-long orbits - 20 in all - lifts the spacecraft high above Saturn's northern hemisphere before sending it hurtling past the outer edges of the planet's main rings.

Nasa said that it would release images from future passes that included some of the closest-ever views of the outer rings and small moons that orbit there.

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Images from Saturn Cassini probe reveal Titan's dunes and frigid landscape in new detail

“Frigid alien landscapes” are coming to light in new radar images of Saturn's largest moon, Titan, captured from NASA's Cassini spacecraft.

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Marvel at the space-beauty of Cassini's final close-up image of Saturn's moon Dione

Two of the new images show the surface of Dione at the best resolution ever.

Cassini captures strange red arcs on Saturn's moon Tethys

Researchers created this enhanced-color image by compositing recent shots of Tethys taken by Cassini. Current top hypotheses for the unusual red arcs are: Read the rest

Pluto and other known “not-planets” in our solar system mapped in scale image montage

“Their non-planetary status is a handicap because these are the worlds that we need to get Earthlings excited about exploring.”

NASA's Cassini spacecraft to do close fly-by of Saturn's moon Dione on June 16

Cassini will get as close as 321 miles (516 kilometers) of Dione's surface if all goes as planned.

Cassini revisited

Boing Boing Science Editor Maggie Koerth-Baker recaps the latest news from the far-flung probe, whose journey to the outer solar system yields more beautiful images.

The crazy storm on Saturn

Fun fact: Saturn has a storm that's every bit as big as Jupiter's better-known Great Red Spot. It's been spinning over Saturn's north pole for 30 years. And it's shaped like a hexagon. Read the rest

Images from Cassini's final targeted flyby of Saturn's Moon Rhea

Carolyn Porco, who is the Cassini Imaging Team Leader and Director of CICLOPS in Boulder, CO, writes:

Cassini's very last targeted flyby of Saturn's moon, Rhea, occurred this past weekend, and images from that event are now on the ground and available for your discerning examination. Take a good, long, luxurious look at these sights from another world, as they will be the last close-ups you'll ever see of this particular moon.
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Morning star of Saturn: Cassini views Venus

Dawn on Saturn is greeted across the vastness of interplanetary space by the morning star, Venus, in this image from NASA's Cassini spacecraft.

Carolyn Porco, Cassini Imaging Team Leader and director of CICLOPS, writes:

Every so often, our cameras on Cassini digitally record, either intentionally or incidentally, other celestial bodies besides those found around Saturn. The Cassini Imaging Team is releasing a pair of images that did just that. Venus, a lovely shining beacon of light and Earth's `twin' planet, was recently sighted amidst the glories of Saturn and its rings.

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New Cassini eye candy: the changing seasons of Saturn

Carolyn Porco, Cassini Imaging Team Leader and director of CICLOPS in Boulder, CO, writes:

For no other reason than that they are gorgeous, the Cassini imaging team is releasing today a set of fabulous images of Saturn and Titan...in living color...for your day-dreaming enjoyment. Note that our presence at Saturn for the last 8 years has made possible the sighting of subtle changes with time, and one such change is obvious here. As the seasons have advanced, and spring has come to the north and autumn to the south throughout the Saturn system, the azure blue in the northern winter Saturnian hemisphere that greeted Cassini upon its arrival in 2004 is now fading; and it is now the southern hemisphere, in its approach to winter, that is taking on a bluish hue.

[B]ack here on Earth, the Cassini mission was recently given rave reviews by a panel of planetary scientists and NASA program managers for its contributions to our understanding of the solar system, a circumstance that bodes well for a well-funded continuing mission over the next 5 years. Despite the fact that we can't know exactly what the next five years will bring us, we can be certain that whatever it is will be wondrous.

Photo above: "A giant of a moon appears before a giant of a planet undergoing seasonal changes in this natural color view of Titan and Saturn from NASA's Cassini spacecraft."

More beautiful images from Cassini here.

Hellooooo, new desktop. Read the rest