This beautiful Tintin tome is full of all wonderful things Herge


If you're a fan of Tintin comics and of Hergé (Georges Remi), this is one book you’ll want to own. Nothing “comic book” or throw away about this beautifully produced volume. The form factor and details are wonderful: a square format with an elegant embossed black and white drawing close-up of Tintin with his trademark quiff on the cover. It has also red- and white-checkerboard page edges, just like the iconic rocket ship from “Destination Moon.” This one will display nicely with the rest of your Tintin collectibles.

It won't stay on the display shelf for long. The 480 pages inside are just as delightful. It’s full of colorful images of all things Hergé, from enticing photos of the Hergé Museum in Brussels (you’ll want to go!), to artifacts and models used in the production of the Tintin books, snapshots and promotional pictures of Hergé, and lots of images of actual camera art.

You’ll see up close and in detail how Hergé created his books, from preliminary rough sketches and figure drawings, pencil layouts and revisions, reference materials and photography, original camera art line (with all the corrections) and the final colored print version. A real look “inside” that the comic fan will appreciate.

Tintin: The Art of Hergé by Michel Daubert Harry N. Abrams 2013, 480 pages, 8.5 x 8.5 x 1.8 inches (paperback) $31 Buy one on Amazon

See sample pages from this book at Wink. Read the rest

Lovecraftian Tintin adventures

I'd love to read the H.P. Lovecraft-Tintin crossovers behind the covers expertly painted by Murray Groat. UPDATE: Murray adds that these aren't for sale as Hergé/Moulinsart S.A.'s rights apply. "I am getting alot of print requests by email, which is nice, but I have to sadly tell each and everyone of them that I cannot." Read the rest

Tintin copyrights go to war against Tintin fans

The British lawyer who married the widow of Tintin creator Hergé has successfully sued Bob Garcia ("a detective novelist, jazz musician and Tintin aficionado") for £35,000 for printing five short essays in appreciation of Tintin, two of which were illustrated with brief clips from the comic. The essays were distributed for free on a non-profit basis, and the two pamphlets with Tintin illustrations were printed about 500 times each.

Nick Rodwell, the plaintiff, was accused by Garcia of "a ruthless drive to kill off their harmless and not-for-profit passion in his bid to keep exclusive control of the Tintin brand."

Britain's "fair dealing" offers less protection to fans and scholars than does the US's "fair use" (itself a complicated doctrine). Combined with a litigious copyright owner, it's a recipe for disaster when it comes to free speech, scholarship, and fan activity.

Hundreds of Tintin fans have already backed Mr Garcia, who on Thursday called for a boycott of the film and claimed that many supporters were heeding his demand. More than 500 people have joined his page on the Facebook website which expresses "anger and disgust" over the issue. More supporters have also backed his cause on other websites.

Mr Garcia said: "We have nothing against Mr Spielberg even if there is a boycott threat against his film ... but are asking him to intervene in favour of not just me but all people who are being prevented from sharing their passion for Tintin..."

Stéphane Steeman, who ran the Hergé Friendship Club for 25 years, has just released a book in which he castigates Mr Rodwell for trying to kill off his organisation, called The Escalation.

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