Stålenhag

Bio-modem: a fan-art tribute to Simon Stålenhag's Things From the Flood

Leo Corvaisier, an art student in Paris, created this 3D rendered "bio-modem" based on an illustration from Things From the Flood, an alternative future-history of Sweden published in 2016 by Simon Stålenhag (previously), which was turned into a crowdfunded RPG last year. Corvaisier notes, "Tried getting a handpaint feeling to stick with Stålenhag's illustration style." (via JWZ) Read the rest

The 2019 Locus Award nominees: your guide to the best sf/f of 2018

Locus Magazine has published its annual Locus Award finalists, a shortlist of the best science fiction and fantasy of the past calendar year. I rely on this list to find the books I've overlooked (so. many. books.). This year's looks like a bumper crop. Read the rest

Megalophobia

r/megalophobia is a my new favorite subreddit, specializing in things that are very big and therefore very, very scary. Postings range from Lovecraftian monsters looming in the mist to zoom-out animations impressing upon the viewer the insignificance of Planet Earth and all human concerns. Currently popular are disturbing photoshops of large comets looming over the major cities they are about to destroy.

Above is "War Machines," by Simon Stålenhag (previously). Read the rest

Watch this evocative trailer for a digital design event

OFFF Milan is known for putting together great promotional work for their annual digital design event, and this year's trailer sets a remarkable tone. Read the rest

Music for DOS: lo-fi album by Simon Stålenhag

Simon Stålenhag's famous for his atmospheric paintings depicting alien technology lurking in the mists of Scandinavia. He's just put out an album of lo-fi ambient music, C:\Music\for\DOS, made with cheap vintage keyboards and legendary 1990s music-making app Impulse Tracker. That's a picture of his "studio" up top: "Oh, the computer to the right was just for playing Doom."

Read the rest

Watch SpaceX's rocket land itself

There's something so uncanny and futuristic about Falcon 9 landing that it triggers the part of our brains trained to be on the lookout for computer graphics. The overcast sky and haze of fog gives it a Simon Stålenhag vibe. Read the rest

Tales from the Loop – An eerie account of a physics research facility gone awry

See sample pages at Wink.

Unfamiliar with sci-fi artist Simon Stålenhag, I was sucked into his eerie dystopian history the instant I cracked open Tales from the Loop. His hyper-real digital paintings depict beautiful Swedish country towns where snow falls in the winter and children play in nature. But each of these pastoral scenes are jarring, with intrusive machines, robots, discarded equipment, and power lines upstaging the otherwise serene landscape.

The book explains that these paintings were inspired by childhood memories of the author, who grew up in a large area of Sweden that housed an underground experimental physics research facility known as The Loop. Alongside each painting is a short essay from the author’s memory. For instance, the three cooling towers in the photo above were built to release heat from the core of the Loop. The towers, which “started like a deep vibration in the ground that slowly rose to three horn-like blasts,” remind Stålenhag of a miserable day he had with a boy named Ossian, who had lured him to his house to play Crash Test Dummies, but ended up bullying him with the help of his brother until Stålenhag went home in tears.

Each painting is accompanied by one of these short yet captivating stories, and their detailed, relatable quality had me going. As I read about Stålenhag and his best friend Olof sneaking off with a boat on a nice summer day to a disturbing machine-littered swimming pond, I kept thinking, “I must go online and research the Loop! Read the rest

Boing Boing Gift Guide 2013

Welcome to this year's Boing Boing Gift Guide, a piling-high of our most loved stuff from 2013 and beyond. There are books, gadgets, toys, music and much else besides: click the categories at the top to filter what you're most interested in—and offer your own suggestions and links!

Swedish seventies neoretrofuturism: the paintings of Simon Stålenhag

Koolburger sez, "Beautiful paintings by Swedish artist Simon Stålenhag. Blending everyday life in Sweden in the 70's with neofuturist structures." These really are amazing, and have a strange air of plausibility that makes them into something like design fiction for a future that never was. He sells prints, too.

Simon Stålenhag Art Gallery Read the rest

:)