This VR Mosh Pit Simulator game is fascinating and horrifying

Video game designer Sos Sosowski has been working on his Mosh Pit Simulator game since 2016. Here's the official game description:

Mosh Pit Simulator is a VR game about a world that is overrun by brainless boneless humanoid creatures due to a terrible accident. They're like zombies but less gross and pretty harmless and just want to live normal lives. So even tho they don't have brains or bones, they still try to go shopping, drive cars, or go to dates, not necessarily doing a good job at that. But there's one person who is not OK with that. YOU! So you decide to save the world from these weird creatures. But there's nobody else left in the world but them so you end up just getting in their way for giggles.... or do you?

Basically, the premise is: "What if you moshed by yourself using Oculus Rift?" And the earliest 3D model testing clips are like a glorious car crash that you just can't look away from:

Sosowski explains the background of this weird experiment:

This game was created by accident. The development began in April 2016, when I got my hands on the Vive Development Kit. After playing some games, I decided to give it a shot and create something.

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Very weird faceless robot baby for elderly people

Hiro-chan is a very simple, inexpensive, and, er, faceless robotic baby doll designed to comfort elderly people. (Video below.) Unlike the very similar looking Amish dolls that lack faces for religious reasons, Hiro-chan's developers Vstone say that leaving the features up to the individual's imagination is an effective way to increase the emotional bond. From Evan Ackerman's article at IEEE Spectrum:

Hiro-chan’s entire existence seems to be based around transitioning from sad to happy in response to hugs. If left alone, Hiro-chan’s mood will gradually worsen and it’ll start crying. If you pick it up and hug it, an accelerometer will sense the motion, and Hiro-chan’s mood will improve until it starts to laugh. This is the extent of the interaction, but you’ll be glad to know that the robot has access to over 100 utterance variations collected from an actual baby (or babies) to make sure that mood changes are fluid and seamless.

...Since the functionality of the robot depends on you getting it go from sad to happy, Vstone says that giving the robot a face (and a fixed expression) would make that much less convincing and emotionally fulfilling—the robot would have the “wrong” expression half the time. Instead, the user can listen to Hiro-chan’s audio cues and imagine a face. Or not. Either way, the Uncanny Valley effect is avoided (as long as you can get over the complete lack of face, which I personally couldn’t), and the cost of the robot is kept low since there’s no need for actuators or a display.

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