Bunnie Huang's open Geiger counter: design notes and reference

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12 Responses to “Bunnie Huang's open Geiger counter: design notes and reference”

  1. Lobster says:

    iCancer?

  2. bridgham says:

    The very idea of a “stylish” geiger counter is an obscenity on par with designer body armor and QR code tattoos.

  3. ssam says:

    If these (or a similar product) become widely available  i think people would be a lot less scared of radiation.

    • Lobster says:

       Why?  I imagine if I had a geiger counter I’d start taking readings on everything and I’d be horrified to find out how many (mildly, safely) radioactive things are around me every day.

      • ssam says:

        and you would realise that all life on earth has been bathed in low levels of radiation for ever.

        people know that sunlight, cigarettes, and many other things can cause cancer, but they dont freak out when they see them. when they hear that there is mili or micro or nano sievert of radiation they panic because they think it something unusual. 

  4. awjt says:

    Where can I get one of these?  I’ll just have it on all the time, in my pocket, with volume down low or in an earbud, and I’ll move away from irradiated things.  Simple.

  5. Warren_Terra says:

    I was suspicious about its ability to detect all forms of radiation – I dimly recall in lab Radiation Safety Training being taught we had to use a sensor the size and shape of an 8 oz can of tomato paste to detect weaker forms of radiation – but it claims to have incorporated a smaller version of just such a sensor – impressive.
    The lack of Bluetooth is a shame, though – one of the most obvious uses would be to link it to a Smartphone that could log its readings and add GPS data. Apparently it was not included for reasons of cost and battery life.

  6. bridgham says:

    Could there be a vest that changes color with rising or falling levels of harmful radiation?

  7. wrybread says:

    Very cool.

    I personally credit Bunnie with being the father of the modern tablet computer. The Chumby did it all first: a walled garden app store, a device who’s sole purpose is to entertain (as opposed to being some sort of “assistant”), wifi, small touchscreen. 

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