Innovation Under Austerity: Eben Moglen's call to arms from the Freedom to Connect conference

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14 Responses to “Innovation Under Austerity: Eben Moglen's call to arms from the Freedom to Connect conference”

  1. jclark says:

    Added the link to audio file to F2C video page: freedom-to-connect.net/videos – Thanks Cory!

  2. Jens Alfke says:

    I couldn’t hear much he was saying — the chamber was too echoey. All I got was “blah blah Facebook sucks blah blah free software rules”. This is a better use of my time than reading through random Hacker News comment threads?

    • Handletag says:

      “If you are not moved by this talk your frog is boiled.”

      Either that, or your hearing needs enhancement.

    • kozmcrae says:

      There was nothing wrong with the chamber.  The “echo” was a result of the emptiness in your head.  Maybe your heart too.  One thing for sure, the pride you show in your own ignorance makes you look about as dumb as a bag of hammers.

  3. cjporkchop says:

    “So a little thug in a hooded sweatshirt made the Web easy to write, and created a man-in-the-middle attack on human civilization.”

    What’s with the hoodie hate?

    • signsofrain says:

      That quote is praise for the hooded thug.

      • cjporkchop says:

         I don’t think so.

        “So a little thug in a hooded sweatshirt made the Web easy to write, and created a man-in-the-middle attack on human civilization. That’s the intermediary innovation that we should be concerned about. We made everything possible… and then intermediaries to innovation turned it into the horror that is Facebook. It’s intermediated innovation serving the needs of financiers, not the needs of people.”

    • Lexicat says:

      i agree, porkchop. the repeated invocation of “thug in a hooded sweatshirt”/”thug in a hoodie” eerily evoked the description of trevon  martin for me. i totally dug eben’s talk, otherwise, but the ad hominem metaphor had some unpleasant overtones (and yes, i especially agree with the dark implications he raised about facebook).

  4. Ultan says:

    Eben says: “the Web is less than 8000 days old.” Much less, for anybody who didn’t have a UNIX box with X-windows. Version 0.6b, the first publicly available beta version of Mosaic that supported Windows, was released September 28, 1993. It didn’t work very well.

    The first browser version that was fairly usable on common operating systems was Mosaic version 1.0, released 11/11/1993,  6,773 days ago. I think that should be regarded as the real birthday of the web.

    The Web turns 20 next year, but we can celebrate 10M minutes Nov. 15 of this year, and 7000 days on January 10th of next year.

  5. Forrest O. says:

    I see the browser and browser-based programming as the end-run around the kind of lockdown he describes.

    Disclaimer: I’m helping to make a framework for hackable web apps.

  6. sflc says:

    A full transcript of this talk is available at: https://www.softwarefreedom.org/events/2012/freedom-to-connect_moglen-keynote-2012.html 

    Thanks to Ben Asselstine for the translation.

  7. Amelia_G says:

    Cool, thank you! I am typing before listening but: are lawyers and lobbyists also thriving intermediaries, in this sense? …I wonder how historians could innovate, in a good way.

  8. trentondouglas says:

    Thanks. That was very interesting.  A lot of growing industries are like Mr. Moglen describes.  They attract innovators and inventors who are able to tinker and create.  Then, changes in regulation, economics, and technological complexity seem to  make entry into industries less and less accessible, decreasing innovation over time.   

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