Too High to Fail: Cannabis and the New Green Economic Revolution - exclusive interview with author Doug Fine

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25 Responses to “Too High to Fail: Cannabis and the New Green Economic Revolution - exclusive interview with author Doug Fine”

  1. EH says:

    The word “hubris” comes to mind, I’m sorry to say.

  2. Gideon Jones says:

    One of the more depressing and visible aspects of watching the medical marijuana industry pretty much get shut down in my state two years ago was the sudden shuttering of dozens of little mom and pop hydroponic equipment stores that had popped up to support people growing their own.  It wasn’t just the dispensaries, but all these other little businesses that supported them.

    Which is somewhat ironic given that it was largely the supposed freedom-loving, small-business-supporting, government-intervention-hating Tea Partiers that swept the elections in 2010 that were responsible for the new law.

  3. Brian Richerson says:

    It’s ok that it won’t be American Hemp, because we love the number 1 manufacturer of hemp in the entire world! LONG LIVE CHINEESE HEMP. /sarcasm

  4. Tim in SF says:

    “56% in favor of regulating cannabis like alcohol, up from 49%”

    That’s all well and good, but the numbers looked good in early 2010 when Prop 19 qualified for  California’s November ballot. 

    Six months of negative advertising, sponsored by an unholy alliance between the alcohol lobby and marijuana dispensaries and “pot doctors” managed to drag those numbers far below 50%. 

    My own “pot doc,” a nice, little-old lady, sent a letter out to every one of her patients. Decrim would have killed her business. 

    These days, when I see a California pot club get shut down, I don’t feel sorry for them. Almost without exception, they are the ones behind the failure of pot decriminalization and are thus responsible for their own harassment. 

    Bottom line: take surveys such as these with a grain of salt. Voters are fickle (and largely stupid) and can be swayed with obvious lies in bad television commercials.

  5. zombiebob says:

    > Bottom line: take surveys such as these with a grain of salt. Voters are fickle >(and largely stupid) and can be swayed with obvious lies in bad television commercials.

    Very true, and very sad

  6. elix says:

    When the illegal cartels AND law enforcement both want to keep something illegal, but the people (or at least a lot of them) want it legalized, you really should go “Hmmm.”

    Anyone who hasn’t should also see the award-winning documentary “The Union: The Business Behind Getting High”. It’s on Netflix, but if you don’t have Netflix or it’s not available in your region, the creators have placed the full movie on YouTube because they feel this information should be accessible without a paywall. The Union focuses primarily on British Columbia’s marijuana industry, but it also covers an overview of marijuana prohibition in general.

    The Union crew are currently running a Kickstarter (that needs more funding before it ends in 17 days!) for the “sequel”, The Culture High.

    (Edit: I guess I should link to the Kickstarter if I mention that it’s in need of more backers. Disclaimer: I have no connection to the production of either movie whatsoever; I watched The Union and am in favour of decriminalization/legalization.
    Edit 2: Now with less broken linky fail.)

  7. Brood-X says:

    Fine must  realize that there exists a cottage industry of marijuana reform advocacy which profits from keeping cannabis illegal.

    • elix says:

      I… think you’re shooting for a very small target, there, when there are much larger groups that are reaping massive profits from maintaining prohibition. Going after advocacy groups that happen to benefit from cartel-grade pricing is like going after small-time street gangs and ignoring the Mafia operation that’s got most of the county in its grip.

      • Brood-X says:

        I like your analogy that equates street gangs with advocacy groups.  

        • elix says:

          If that’s as far as you can see in the comparison between the scales, I can’t help you.

        • wysinwyg says:

          Wait, weren’t you the one who was just criticizing advocacy groups? Wasn’t elix rebutting your criticism? How do you then jump to “how dare you smear advocacy groups!?”

  8. griefo says:

    Mark: Thanks for word on the book. Additionally, you might want to check out Greg Campbell’s Pot Inc. for, in addition to an overview of marijuana prohibition, a Colorado-centric account of medical marijuana. As part of his research, Campbell, the author of Blood Diamonds, grew his own in his Fort Collins home.

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