Guitar picks made from coins

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53 Responses to “Guitar picks made from coins”

  1. xzzy says:

    I’ve played with a normal quarter, and it feels terrible. The metal on metal is nearly nails-on-chalkboard irritating. Not all convinced it has any effect on tone either.

    But there are some musicians out there that seem to like it.. it does provide some certainty that you’ll always be able to play because random folks are much more likely to have a quarter in their pocket than a guitar pick and everyone knows how easy it is to lose a pick.

    • huskypants says:

      Normal quarters are awful for playing with but I’ve used metal picks before and they’re not too bad. I generally prefer to use plastic picks either way. I’d be interested to see if the feel of these is closer to coins or actual metal picks, because I’m honestly not sure if it’s the edge of a coin, the thickness, or both that make them so unpleasant to use.

      • Dlo Burns says:

        Could it be the roundness that’s part of the problem?

        • huskypants says:

          I don’t think so. My plastic picks get pretty worn down and rounded by the time I throw them out. It’s obviously not ideal but not the end of the world. But as Benjamin Terry notes below, quarters have rough edges on them and I notice it makes contact with the string in a weird way. Canadian nickels have a smooth edge, but a bit of a “rim” that I find catches on wound guitar strings. So the edge is part of it, but even with metal picks, thick picks are quite a bit thinner than a coin so that changes the feel as well. I have played with super thick (2-3mm) plastic and felt picks and found them uncomfortable, 1mm is my ideal. So I’m curious about these but skeptical.

      • Benjamin Terry says:

        Yeah, quarters I don’t like because of their rough edges. Sometimes a nickle can be OK though.  The wide smooth edge means you can use it as an impromptu 1 or 2 string slide.  My dream pick would be a nylon pick with a nickle top, just so you’d have that slide/tap option with the nickle bit.

        • beepbeep says:

          Using the edge of a quarter intrigues me. I could easily running the edge parallel down a string for a shredding effect. I played with Jon Dee Graham way, way back and he could do that shred with a normal pick. But then, he was one of those guys that you just assumed actually played in his sleep and in the toilet, the shower…. He’s very good.

  2. Christopher says:

    These are quite beautiful, but, as a numismatist, such abuse of coins still makes me cringe. I greatly prefer Heywood Banks’s system of making his guitar picks out of his plastic hotel key cards. Admittedly they’re not as beautiful, and, because he says he’s always losing picks, he has to spend a lot of time going back to the front desk to get new key cards.

  3. Rickenbacker4001 says:

    One of the greatest guitarists ever plays with a sixpence from the farewell proof set of 1970. Brian May.

    • Graz65 says:

       I was about to mention Brian playing with a sixpence. He says he prefers it because of the sharpness of the attack.

  4. Brian May (Queen’s guitarist) famously uses coins as picks, but I don’t think he cuts them down.

  5. Marc Montoya says:

    aww, dont grind the wheat pennies!  

  6. iamlegion says:

    Does it put a lot of extra wear & tear on the strings (vs. a plastic pic)?

  7. limeychiney says:

    Countdown to indictment from Justice Department for defacing money. The below says bill, draft or note, but I’m guessing it applies to coins.

    From the U.S. Treasury:

    “..Whoever mutilates, cuts, disfigures, perforates, unites or cements together, or does any other thing to any bank bill, draft, note, or other evidence of debt issued by any national banking association, Federal Reserve Bank, or Federal Reserve System, with intent to render such item(s) unfit to be reissued, shall be fined not more than $100 or imprisoned not more than six months, or both.

    Defacement of currency in such a way that it is made unfit for circulation comes under the jurisdiction of the United States Secret Service….”

    • Dlo Burns says:

      What about all those Smoosh-a-penny machines?

    • bardfinn says:

      It’s a matter of judgement and enforcement. The law in question is meant to be used against people smelting currency for its metal value, hoarders attempting to destabilise the economy / DoS the economy / exhaust the Mint, and so forth. There’s personal property rights and free speech rights to be considered before the consideration of “Dude made a handful of craft items out of coins, in contravention of this law.”

      The key word here is “intent”, and proving intent is notoriously difficult.

  8. Petr Aardvark says:

    It might work for some people though I need a certain amount of flex in the picks for my tenor banjo. I do like that pickpunch where you can punch out your own out of plastic cards.

  9. fromnabulax fromnabulax says:

    I use both quarters and nickles on electric guitars, but never on an acoustic. I don’t file them down either, just simply pick away on whatever I have in my pocket.
    I first learned the benefits of using coins from Curt Kirkwood of the Meat Puppets back in the early 1980s. I think he picked it up from seeing Billy Gibbons a couple of times.
    Not only does it hone your skills as it’s extra important without a picks ability to flex to hit the correct string as needed, but the amplified metal pick on metal string is especially attractive in hard rock.

    • Mattias Björkas says:

      It’s true that picking with a hard pick (like metal, stone or thick plastic) makes it extra important to hit the strings at the correct angle. Otherwise you get this kind of ugly resonant sound. That also makes it very difficult to strum, since strumming involves hitting each string with a slightly different angle. Therefore, hard picks are best for solo playing and they really may produce a different tone, even on acoustics.

  10. Donald Petersen says:

    I remember that Mark Knopfler was specifically trying to achieve a Billy Gibbonseque tone when he recorded “Money For Nothing,” and though he actually succeeded pretty well, right down to the gnarly pinch harmonics, he didn’t use a coin, or even a pick.  According to engineer Neil Dorfsman, though the amp miking turned out to be a perfect happy accident that he couldn’t reproduce later, as far as playing went it was just Mark fingerpicking a Les Paul Junior through a Laney amp.

  11. This is the reason to mint a trillion-dollar platinum coin. Make it in the shape of a guitar pick, then deposit it in a special vault/studio at the Federal Reserve. Guitar legends would have the opportunity to play using it, in exchange for performing on a weekly C-SPAN live music show.

  12. Sam says:

    Not to be a spoil-sport, defacing US currency and coins is a federal offense-artistry notwithstanding.

    • Legotech says:

      Section 331 of Title 18 of the United States code provides criminal penalties for anyone who FRAUDULENTLY alters, defaces, mutilates impairs, diminishes, falsifies, scales, or lightens any of the coins coined at the Mints of the United States. This statute means that you may be violating the law if you change the appearance of the coin and fraudulently represent it to be other than the altered coin that it is. As a matter of policy, the Mint does not promote coloring, plating or altering U.S. coinage: however, there are no sanctions against such activity absent fraudulent intent.

    • timquinn says:

      It is a little known fact that it is also illegal to make a comment on bOING bOING without first reading every single comment already made. The penalty is a short sentence of looking foolish in public.

  13. Mitch_M says:

    I don’t know if this would work with modern quarters. I had a quarter separate into two halves that were press fit together. Maybe you could solder it so you had a solid piece of metal to work with.

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