I write books. My latest is a YA science fiction novel called Homeland (it's the sequel to Little Brother). More books: Rapture of the Nerds (a novel, with Charlie Stross); With a Little Help (short stories); and The Great Big Beautiful Tomorrow (novella and nonfic). I speak all over the place and I tweet and tumble, too.

7 Responses to “3D printing: with 2D; with holograms; and all-in-one 3D scanning”

  1. theophrastvs says:

    total trivia:  the first thingy, wherein you print a bunch of clear plastic sheets and stack ‘em up to make a “3D” image, is the rediscovery of an old method in protein crystallography called a “Richard’s Box”.   chiefly used before the advent of graphics capable computer monitors (and fancy 3d viewing goggles)

    • favalora says:

      theophrastvs - 

      I’ve never heard of Richard’s Box before, thank you. (I’ve studied electronic volumetric display for many years, it is always a delight to learn something new.)

      Perhaps the electronic analog to the print-out-many-sheets Kickstarter is/was the DepthCube from LightSpace Technologies. [I was the founder of a different 3-D display firm, Actuality Systems.]

      Gregg Favalora

      • ModelBox3D says:

        favalora-

        Nope we’re not associated with LightSpace, we’re just two young makers putting out our first project. 

        theophrastvs-

        It’s funny, we never came across Richard’s Box in our research but we’re just about to do some updates in the same vein. We’re about to do a handful of things that CAN’T be 3D printed, like brain scans, MRI’s, molecular displays, ultrasounds, and solar system imagery.

        Hopefully you guys will check us out!
        http://kck.st/12bz9QJ

        -Laura

  2. Jake0748 says:

    Sorry, but headline = totally incoherent, not-explanatory,   hype, bs.  DKHLIW;DNR. 

    (Don’t know how long it was, did not read).

  3. slippy0 says:

    Considering how advanced our 3d scanning/printing research is, I’m really amazed that it’s taking us this long to come out with proper commercial products. 

    • Steve Nordquist says:

       No matter how awesome your kids’ Montessori is, chances are it only ever spent a day in a year teaching and playing with 11-D models. So tricking out more than 2 1/2 is not a major feed for hard sciences training (mapreduce…you know, it’s fixing that a little at a time.)

      Prep 6 papers, launch 6 solidly grounded companies; win enough to buy 1 special (e.g. no glasses required or 2 shows at 2 sets of viewing angles) 3D TV in the lotto and crash with the keynote at Siggraph Asia.

  4. MacD says:

     Actuality Systems … holy shit, but that takes me back! You did some fascinating work, just about the time when I was working with 3D printers with a z resolution of 1mm :)
    The moment I saw your (spinning plane in a globe) volumetric display, I wanted one … whatever became of it and what are you up to now?

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