EPA committed 'covert propaganda' social media campaign on American public, auditors find

Congressional auditors say The Environmental Protection Agency engaged in “covert propaganda,” a violation of federal law, when it launched a massive social media campaign urging Americans to support the Waters of the United States rule.

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A better solution for astronauts who drink their own piss

Aquaporin A/S made this new small and lightweight filter that uses aquaporins, membrane proteins, to turn urine, sweat, and wastewater into drinkable water. Read the rest

Meet Martin Riese, water sommelier

"The most interesting part for me about water is it all looks the same... but still there's a huge taste profile to it." Read the rest

80 million plastic balls to prevent Los Angeles reservoirs from becoming carcinogenic

The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power is buying 80 million 4-inch black polyethylene balls to cover the surfaces of three Los Angeles reservoirs that serve 4 million residents. At a cost of 33 cents each, the hollow spheres are designed to block sunlight from turning bromide and chlorine in the water into bromate, a suspected carcinogen.

Photos of the ball manufacturing equipment at XavierC in Glendora, California.

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Puppy doesn't understand how water works

May we all contemplate the mysteries of dihydrogen monoxide with such joy.

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Which water technology will save California from its long, dry death?

The western United States exists in a state of willful ignorance about water. Waking up won't be easy, and it will be expensive.

Hotel in Belfast charges $41 for bottle of melted iceberg water

The Merchant Hotel in Belfast employs two water butlers to help patrons select the right kind of H20 to match their meal. "Whilst experts can differentiate between the mineral content and PH balance of different types of water, discerning consumers are also increasingly demanding a wider choice of waters," Merchant Hotel's general manager Gavin Carroll told the Belfast Telegraph. Cheapskates can get away with an $8 bottle of Speyside from the UK Scotland Glenlivet Estate, while those desperate to impress will order the $41 bottle of Iceberg from the Canadian Arctic Ice shelf in Newfoundland.

From the restaurant's water menu:

In the Canadian Arctic, the snow froze and compacted into enormous glacial walls, sheltered from all impurities from the outside world. Thousands of years later, the ice is considered to hold the purest water on earth. The water has the lowest mineral content of any bottled water, resulting in a smooth and neutral taste.

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How to fill 40 water balloons all at once, for an awesome water balloon battle

“Filling up 40 balloons automatically makes for a much faster balloon fight.” Read the rest

Tom Selleck accused of stealing water from fire hydrant

Tom Selleck, best known as Magnum P.I., has apparently settled, at least tentatively, with the Ventura County water district after the actor was accused of stealing water from a fire hydrant and trucking it to their 60-acre ranch. Read the rest

Enormous sculpture doubles as movable water filtration device

Architect Andres Jaque's Office for Political Innovation has installed Cosmo at MoMA. The whimsical water filtration sytem on wheels is designed to make people think about municipal water delivery systems that are generally invisible in our daily lives. The firm said in a statement: Read the rest

California drought: State orders historic water cuts for farmers

“The state is reaching back more than a century in the hierarchy of California water rights,” reports the Los Angeles Times.

Bottled water: the ultimate throwback to feudal selfishness

Sure, you're boycotting Nestle for draining California's drought-stricken aquifers for bottled water, but why stop there? Read the rest

Ducks race to water slide

The giggling child makes it even cuter.

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The issue with arsenic

Arsenic. Hearing the word in America usually brings up black and white mental images of the film "Arsenic and Old Lace." Yet, it is not an old issue. People around the world are exposed to dangerous levels of arsenic in their water.

Speaking today at the American Geophysical Union, Lex van Green discussed the issue of arsenic in well water in the Asian sub-continent, primarily in Bangladesh and Bihar, India. His concern is that even though people are aware of the problem, very little is being done to address it.

People continue to drill new wells without determining their safety (safe levels are set at less than 10 micrograms per liter of water). Van Green's data, collected from 2012-13, show that 50% of people in the area assessed drink water containing arsenic at unsafe levels. However, 100% of people live near safe wells. Additionally, only about a third of people who become aware that their wells are contaminated switch to new wells by either drilling new wells or using their neighbor's wells.

The difference between a safe well and an arsenic contaminated well is depth. Sedimentation by ancient arsenic rich waters along river deltas left layers of arsenic containing soil near the surface of the Earth. To get past the arsenic to clean aquifers, one has only to drill deeper than 100 meters down. However, wells are expensive to drill, and the deeper the well, the more expensive it will be.

So, the problem in these areas where there is no infrastructure to deliver treated water to people boils down one of inequality. Read the rest

VIDEO: Hallucinatory NARCOSE captures free diving's beauty and danger (NSFW)

Thalassophobes and NSFW-phobes will want to skip this beautiful short about deepwater free diver Guillaume Néry and the kinds of hypoxia-induced hallucinations he experiences when free diving to depths beyond 100 meters. Thalassophiles who love beautiful underwater cinematography and trippy dream sequences will find the underwater footage hypnotic. Read the rest

Charity:Water's powerful video on water in Mali and Niger

Rael Dornfest from Charity:Water says, "Today is a huge day at charity: water as we launch our annual September Campaign. It's our biggest campaign ever as we try to raise $4 million to bring 100,000 people clean water in the Sahel region."

"The key to our campaign is a powerful 6 minute video our team shot earlier this year in Mali and Niger. Women there pull dirty water by hand out of 60 foot holes in 100 degree heat. Access to clean water completely transforms their lives."

September Campaign | 2014 | charity: water (Thanks, Rael!) Read the rest

History of the Slip 'N Slide

My wife (and kids) are big fans of the classic Slip 'N Slide on a summer day. The New York Times Magazine has the history of its invention which involved belly-flopping on a concrete driveway.

Like any concerned father with ready access to rugged, waterproof synthetic fabrics at work, Robert Carrier took home a 50-foot roll of beige Naugahyde in hopes of persuading his son to splash down on something safer. He unfurled it in the yard, hosed it down and watched as every kid in the neighborhood showed up and stayed to slide for hours.

Realizing he had a hit on his hands, Carrier used his sewing skills to refine his product. “He stitched a long tube along one side, sewn shut at one end, with spaces between the stitching so that when you attached the hose, the water pressure would build up and water would squirt out those openings and lubricate the surface of the material,” (explains Tim Walsh, author of "Timeless Toys: Classic Toys and the Playmakers Who Created Them.")

(Thanks, Tanya Schevitz!) Read the rest

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