"clearview"

'GrokNet', the AI behind Facebook Shops, looks for body type, skin tone, location, socioeconomic class in photos

• Yay, Clearview AI but for shopping!

Facebook Mark Zuckerberg today announced the launch of Facebook Shops, an e-commerce feature to allows business users to list and sell products on Facebook and Instagram. Read the rest

Clearview AI promises to cancel accounts that aren't law enforcement or government entities

Clearview AI is reportedly set to cancel client accounts that are not associated with law enforcement or other government entities, as scrutiny grows over abuses of the facial recognition AI app. Read the rest

Damien Patton, CEO of tech surveillance company Banjo, once helped KKK shoot up a synagogue: Report

“We believe that the Blacks and the Jews are taking over America, and it’s our job to take America back for the White race,” Patton testified at trial, describing his beliefs while carrying out the crime — beliefs he said he no longer held.

Banjo CEO Damien Patton has admitted to being a Neo-Nazi skinhead in his youth. But until today, the extent of his activity had not yet been reported, in part because of multiple spellings of his name used over the years. Read the rest

Businesses and stores are adding AI to security cameras for social distancing and mask-wearing compliance

📷 Pepper Construction is using Startup SmartVid.io to analyze worksite images for Oracle Industries Innovation Lab in Deerfield, Illinois.

Existing security cameras at retail stores and workplaces are being equipped with articifial intelligence to enforce measures intendded to slow the spread of the novel coronavirus, Reuters reports, based on interviews with 16 different machine vision software firms and a number of businesses that are now their clients. Read the rest

More reporting links Clearview AI to Trump-aligned racists, neo-Nazis, and alt-right trolls

“Big Brother, it turned out, was wearing a MAGA cap”

Clearview AI gave accounts to ex Trump staffer, GOPers, Holocaust denier

Clearview AI said its facial recognition tool was only for law enforcement, but Buzzfeed News reports they gave accounts to former Trump staffer Jason Miller, as well as various Republican political operatives and a figure known to be a Holocaust denier. Read the rest

Investors used Clearview AI app as a personal toy for spying on public

“Before Clearview Became a Police Tool, It Was a Secret Plaything of the Rich.” That's the title of the New York Times piece, and that's the horrifying reality of how artificial intelligence and facial recognition are already being used in ways that violate your expectations of privacy in the world. Read the rest

Clearview AI clients: Best Buy, Walmart, ICE, DOJ, FBI, 2,200+ companies and law enforcement agencies

BuzzFeed News reporters have seen leaked Clearview AI documents that show the company is “working with more than 2,200 law enforcement agencies, companies, and individuals around the world,” including Best Buy, Walmart, Macy's, ICE, DOJ, and the FBI, plus “a sovereign wealth fund in the United Arab Emirates.” Read the rest

Clearview client list "stolen"

Clearview, the shady facial-recognition firm with links to law-enforcement and alt-right internet trolls, reports that its entire client list has been stolen.

In the notification, which The Daily Beast reviewed, the startup Clearview AI disclosed to its customers that an intruder “gained unauthorized access” to its list of customers, to the number of user accounts those customers had set up, and to the number of searches its customers have conducted. The notification said the company’s servers were not breached and that there was “no compromise of Clearview’s systems or network.” The company also said it fixed the vulnerability and that the intruder did not obtain any law-enforcement agencies’ search histories.

Not a good look for any security company--especially one that prides itself on scraping private information from Facebook, Twitter and the rest of the web, irrespective of whether they're permitted to, and repackaging it for government and the police to identify and track individuals through surveillance. Read the rest

Canada investigating facial recognition company Clearview AI over privacy, security concerns

Canada's privacy authorities on Friday said they are investigating New York-based Clearview AI over concerns the facial recognition technology may not comply with Canadian privacy law. Read the rest

The answer to the Clearview AI scandal is better privacy laws, not anti-scraping laws

Clearview AI (previously) is a grifty facial recognition company that sells untested, secretive tools to police departments, claiming that they can identify people from security camera footage by matching the pictures those scraped from big social media sites. Read the rest

Clearview AI founder linked to Trump world and Far-Right, NYPD denies facial recognition firm's boast that it helped catch terrorist suspect

Hoan Ton-That, founder of facial recognition tech firm Clearview AI, previously connected to Trump world figures and online hate extremists, reports Buzzfeed News

Chuck Johnson, Mike Cernovich, and Rudy Giuliani are among the linked figures named in Buzzfeed report

NYPD disputes facial recognition firm Clearview AI's claim that it identified a terrorism suspect Read the rest

Twitter tells facial-recognition app maker to stop scraping photos, Clearview AI used by 600+ US law enforcement agencies

Clearview AI app used by 600+ law enforcement agencies, from local police departments to FBI, DHS

Twitter told law enforcement app maker Clearview AI that its scraping of Twitter images for facial recognition databases violated Twitter policies. Read the rest

U.S. Highway Administration orders return to vintage typeface

In 2004, a more legible typeface, Clearview, was approved to improve America's road signs. But after a decade of use, U.S. Federal Highway Administration has decided to return to the old typeface, publicly available as Highway Gothic.

The reasoning isn't clear—they claim that it's actually more legible than Clearview, but are yet to explain why or offer research to back up the decision. Highway Gothic, designed in the 1940s, has peculiarities held to compromise its legibility. Clearview's letter forms were designed to be visible at greater distances and under less favorable lighting and weather conditions.

“Helen Keller can tell you from the grave that Clearview looks better,” (designer) Meeker says. At the time, the FHWA agreed. In its 2004 approval memo, the agency noted that Clearview boosted highway-sign legibility for drivers traveling at 45 miles per hour by 80 feet of reading distance—or 1.2 seconds of bonus reading time… From the start, Clearview was greeted as a civic, social, and design success. Around 30 states have adopted the font, making it arguably the dominant design paradigm on U.S. roads. Print magazine called it one of the 10 typefaces of the decade in 2010. The Clearview typeface family was the first digital font ever acquired by the Cooper-Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum. People behind the font spoke about it with swagger.

One possibility is that Clearview must be licensed on a per-user basis, making it too expensive. Also mentioned is its resemblance to other official signage typefaces such as Transport. Read the rest

New roadsign font not in public domain

BoingBoing reader Paul Vallee says,

I was reading this interesting story about a new font being developed for use on roadsigns and with likely broad applications in general legibility. It turns out, disappointingly, that this font is not going to appear in the public domain and is thus not available for download. The reason is that the project is not pubclically administered, rather it is a joint venture between the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and several University and private entities. Looks like the copyright for the font remains in private hands, namely Meeker & Associates Inc. and Terminal Design Inc. You can buy the fontface online but it doesn't come cheap!

Link. Also see: Clearview website with abundant type-geekery: Link, and a spirited discussion here: Link. (Thanks, Oscar Bartos)

Pho list cofounder Jim Griffin says,

Fonts are not copyrightable. Fonts receive no protection under U.S. Copyright law, no matter what font purveyors tell you. It pisses them off, but it's true: Typefaces are not properly the subject of copyright.

Reader Spencer Cross says,

Mr. Griffin's claims about typeface copyrightability are an extreme oversimplification of a very contentious issue. On the same site he's referencing (typeright.org via about.com), you'll find another article about a US District Court judge affirming the copyrightability of font outlines. As with any copyright issue, it's not as cut and dried as we wish it were.

Likewise, I wanted to mention that I think it's interesting that we seem to be assuming that the typeface should be in the public domain because it's being used for highway signage.

Read the rest

:)