The wasabi you think you're eating isn't wasabi

Real wasabi, Wasabia japonica, is apparently one of the most expensive vegetables to grow. That green stuff you're eating? Ground horseradish, Chinese mustard, and, you guessed it, green food coloring. Yum.

According to The Atlantic, "Worldwide, experts believe that this imposter combination masquerades as wasabi about 99% of the time."

Above, meet Shigeo Iida, 75, whose family has grown real wasabi for eight generations.

(via NextDraft)

image: HK 北角 North Point 和田 Wada Japanese Restaurant 放題 Buffet dinner 山葵 green Wasabi Mar-2013

Will 80s hairstyles make a resurgence?

Richard Marx silhouette reminds me of a buffalo for some reason.

Flock of Seagulls hair was outstanding.

The Go Gos on the other hand just looked good.

Cyndi Lauper and Captain Lou would be my inspiration today, but I am bald.

Aside from Flock of Seagulls, these were not even extreme hairstyles. I am sure you have better ones...

Also 80s punk never went out.

Hollingsworth Hound Caught in College Admissions Scandal!

FOLLOW @RubenBolling on the Twitters and a Face Book.

JOIN Tom the Dancing Bug's INNER HIVE, for exclusive early access to comics, extra comics, and much more.

GET Ruben Bolling’s new hit book series for kids, The EMU Club Adventures. “Ruben Bolling is one of my cartooning heroes, and The EMU Club Adventures is seriously, mysteriously funny! - Jeff Kinney, Diary of a Wimpy Kid -> Book One here. - Book Two here.

More Tom the Dancing Bug comics on Boing Boing!
(more…)

A post by racist Iowa congressperson Steve King threatens a second American Civil War

Steve King, a racist Republican US congressperson from Iowa, is making waves again. King posted a meme to Facebook suggesting GOP-leaning Red states would win a new civil war.

LA Times:

“Folks keep talking about another civil war,” the meme read. “One side has about 8 trillion bullets, while the other side doesn’t know which bathroom to use.”

King, whom Congress recently stripped of committee assignments over his comments about white supremacy, annotated the image with a winking emoji and mused, “Wonder who would win....”

King was openly pondering violent, armed conflict, apparently joking about Republican-leaning states fighting their Democratic-leaning neighbors in a second American civil war.

But King, an Iowa native, may have been confused about which side he was on. There, forming the blue warrior’s bicep, was his home state, delivering a cartographic uppercut to the jaw of its red opponent.

King deleted the post, which he shared on an official campaign page, Monday. His office did not respond to questions about the picture or his reasons for posting and removing it.

Why newsletters are the best form of social media: “You don’t have to fight an algorithm to reach your audience”

In The New York Times, Mike Isaac explains why newsletters are a better way of communicating than Facebook and Twitter.

For me, the change has happened slowly but the reasons for it were unmistakable. Every time I was on Twitter, I felt worse. I worried about being too connected to my phone, too wrapped up in the latest Twitter dunks. A colleague created his own digital detox program to reduce his smartphone addiction. I reckon he made the right choice.

Now, when I feel the urge to tweet an idea that I think is worth expounding on, I save it for my newsletter, The Dump (an accurate description of what spills out of my head). It’s much more fun than mediating political fights between relatives on my Facebook page or decoding the latest Twitter dust-up.

I agree with Mike. Platforms like Google, Facebook, and Twitter control every aspect of your communication. As centralized proprietary platforms, they own your content and your audience. They can deplatform you with the push of a button and permanently cut you off from a readership or viewership you've spent years to cultivate. With a newsletter, you have the email addresses of all your subscribers. Newsletters are so much better than Facebook I'm surprised Zuckerberg isn't lobbying Congress to ban them.

Speaking of newsletters, you should check out Boing Boing's newsletter! I also have a couple of newsletters you might be interested in: Recomendo, a weekly newsletter with 6 short tips and recommendations, and Book Freak, a weekly newsletter with useful quotations from books I've read.

Wyld Stallyns speak from the Hollywood Bowl

Thank you both, and everyone else on the project, for working so hard to bring Bill S. Preston and Ted "Theodore" Logan back to us. Clearly it has not been easy. They have been missed.

Party on and be excellent to each other.

Short video about life on a Japanese wasabi farm

According to this video and article from by The Atlantic, most of the wasabi eaten around the world is horseradish with green food coloring in it. Shigeo Iida, a 75-year-old farmer in Japan, grows the real stuff, and in this beautifully shot video, we get to see him harvest wasabi and make wasabi paste while he waxes philosophical. “Real wasabi, like the ones we grow, has a unique, fragrant taste that first hits the nose,” he says. “The sweetness comes next, followed finally by spiciness.”

Image: YouTube/The Atlantic

"Ayn Rand is a Dick" - excerpt from a new book by Mike Monteiro

Mike Monteiro, co-founder and design director of Mule Design, has a new book called Ruined by Design: How Designers Destroyed the World, and What We Can Do to Fix It. He posted a sample chapter from the book, about Objectivist philosopher Ayn Rand's influence on Silicon Valley. He's a funny writer!

Welcome to Silicon Valley. A libertarian stronghold at the very end of America. (Literally.) Silicon Valley, and specifically the venture capital firms of Silicon Valley, are mostly run by old white men who read Ayn Rand in high school, thought it was great, and never changed their minds. (This is where I need to be fair and let you know that not all venture capitalists are monsters. In fact, I’m friends with a few who are lovely people. They are very much the exceptions. Also, every VC who reads this book will think this parenthetical is about them.) In the words of the late great Ann Richards, they were, “born on third base and think they hit a triple.”

For those of you not familiar with Ayn Rand, she wrote crappy books about the power of individual achievement while she collected social security and started some pseudo-philosophy called “objectivism”, which can be summed up in five words: I got mine, fuck you. The old white men of Silicon Valley all have giant Ayn Rand back tattoos. (Look, it’s a chapter about venture capitalism inside an ethics book. I gotta tell a joke once in a while, for all our benefit.)

Image: Ruined by Design

Corroborating evidence that Herodotus wrote accurately about a boat

Prior to its recent discovery the baris was a ship best known through "the father of history," Herodotus' description. There were other references in literature but no physical sign this type of craft ever truly existed. A recent discovery shows Herodotus was no liar.

Science Alert:

In fragment 2.96 of Herodotus' Histories, published around 450 BCE, the Ancient Greek historian - who was writing about his trip to Egypt - describes a type of Nile cargo boat called a baris.

According to his portrayal, it was constructed like brickwork, lined with papyrus, and with a rudder that passed through a hole in the keel.

This steering system had been seen in representations and models through the Pharaonic period - but we had no firm archaeological evidence of its existence until now.

Enter Ship 17, of the now-sunken port city Thonis-Heracleion near the Canopic Mouth of the Nile, dated to the Late Period, 664-332 BCE. Here, researchers have been exploring over 70 shipwrecks, discovering countless artefacts that reveal stunning details about the ancient trade hub and its culture.

Although it's been in the water for at least 2,000 years, the preservation of Ship 17 has been exceptional. Archaeologists were able to uncover 70 percent of the hull.

"It wasn't until we discovered this wreck that we realised Herodotus was right," archaeologist Damian Robinson of The Oxford Centre for Maritime Archaeology told The Guardian.

Image source

The song stuck in my head is the 'Baa Baa Black Sheep' theme

I just realized the theme song I've been singing about my dog Nemo is set to the Black Sheep Squadron opening tune.

After starring in what would be my favorite TV show of all-time The Wild Wild West, Robert Conrad went on to lead the cast in Black Sheep Squadron.

Naturally, I thought the airplane was his co-star.

The series was confusingly renamed after one season, hence the Baa Baa Black Sheep vs Black Sheep Squadron thing.

Look at all the dead projects in this Google Graveyard

I use lots of Google products (Chrome, Gmail, Gcal, YouTube, and Google itself) and like them, but I'm wary of using new Google projects because the company has a history of releasing something, allowing a user base to grow, then yanking the rug out from under everyone by killing the project. This site shows 147 dead Google projects. I miss Google Reader, and will miss Google URL Shortener, Inbox, and even Google+.

IBM supplied surveillance gear to Davao while Duterte was mayor and cheering on the city's police-linked death-squads

During the long years when Philippines strongman Rodrigo Duterte (previously) was mayor of Davao (circumventing term limits by periodically allowing his daughter to run for mayor and serving as her vice-mayor) the city was terrorized by death-squads who enjoyed total impunity as they assassinated police suspects and Duterte's political opponents, while Duterte cheered them on (Duterte has boasted about his participation in extrajudicial killings during this period, but has also denied participation in the death squads). (more…)

Health industry lobbyists are posing as "ordinary citizens who don't want Medicare for All"

Here are some "ordinary citizens" who have recently been featured in the press as people who are completely OK with the state of American healthcare and totally opposed to Medicare for All or any other project to reform America's worst-in-the-world health care system: "Mustafa Tameez, businessman, Texas" (Tameez is managing director at Texas-based Outreach Strategists, a public affairs and lobbying firm that reps Blue Cross Blue Shield of Texas, University of Texas Physicians, and St. Luke’s Hospital). (more…)

California's Right to Repair Bill, killed by Big Ag and Apple, has been reintroduced

Last year, California was one of several states to introduce right to repair legislation that would force companies to end practices that discourage the independent repair sector, creating a requirement to sell replacement parts, provide documentation, and supply codes to bypass DRM systems that locked new parts out of devices until the company activated them. (more…)

Next 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9