For decades, it was an open secret that patients of USC's only full-time gynecologist were complaining about sexual assaults during exams

For nearly 30 years, there was only one full-time gynecologist on staff at the University of Southern California's student health clinic: Dr. George Tyndall, about whom there was a widespread understanding among staff and students that he sexualized his examinations, making overt sexual remarks to the teenagers under his care, fondling them, and waxing creepy about his predilection for Asian women. (more…)

Kindergarten teacher finds bag of crack cocaine in 6-year-old student's mouth

A kindergarten teacher noticed a small plastic bag in one of her student's mouths. The girl was chewing on the bag, thinking the white stuff inside was sugar – but it was actually crack cocaine.

Luckily the teacher, at Mastery Charter Hardy Williams Elementary school in southwest Philadelphia, grabbed the bag before the girl had broken through the plastic. She thought it looked like drugs and called the police. When she asked where the kindergartner got the bag, the girl said she found it in another student's backpack.

According to USA Today:

In a statement, the school, Mastery Charter Hardy Williams Elementary, said both children were taken to the nurse's office "where it was determined there was no evidence either of the students had ingested the substance."

Police said the nurse cleared the children and a school resource officer sent them home. Meanwhile, detectives began to investigate.

The school looked through the belongings of every student in the class but didn't find anything else.

Image: Argv0 - Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, Link

A collaborative bibliography of "economic science fiction"

The Econ-SF wiki is a new, annotated collaborative bibliography of science fiction that delves into economic topics -- remember that Paul Krugman was inspired to get into economics after reading Asimov's "Foundation" novels, to say nothing of all the people whose brains were colonized by Atlas Shrugged. It's brand new and has some notable omissions, and could use your contributions.

Insurance scam backfires on scammer

Two gentleman in the UK attempted to pull a fake collision scam on a driver by backing a scooter into her car. When the car driver told the scooterist and his "witness" that she'd recorded everything on her dashcam, the "injured" scooterist, who made a good show of being crippled, recovered instantly and both he and his accomplice made a hasty exit. I just wish she would have waited to say something about the dashcam until after the police arrived.

GQ's comedy issue cover is an intentionally-'shopped winner

GQ has made the perfect funny with the cover of their comedy issue. It pokes fun at Vanity Fair's cover fail last year with Reese Witherspoon and Oprah Winfrey.

They write:

GQ would like to apologize to Kate McKinnon, Issa Rae, and Sarah Silverman for the egregious mistakes made in the process of creating the cover for our 2018 comedy issue, the latest in our pantheon of mostly annual love letters to the funniest humans we know. Our intention was to celebrate the three super-funny superstars, who are all that is smart and perceptive and riotous and necessary in comedy right now. We deeply regret that the results violated GQ's rigorous standards of editorial excellence and the laws of nature.

In an effort to ensure that an error of this magnitude never happens again, and because this sounds like the right thing to say, GQ will be conducting a thorough internal audit of our cover-development process. To demonstrate our commitment to transparency, we will release the results of the review, quietly, in 17 months, on Medium.

And to you, our respected readers, we know that GQ must work doubly hard to earn back your trust. Until then, we'll be ignoring our mentions.

Come back to GQ.com next week to read the profiles of our three wildly talented, extremely two-handed cover stars. In the meantime, we'll be praying that Donald Trump tweets something about Chrissy Teigen in the next hour so everybody forgets all about this.

(Kottke.org)

The £7 billion Carillion collapse has the UK government talking about breaking up the Big Four accounting firms

Carrillion was the UK government's go-to outsourcing partner, a company with a long and disgraceful history of putting profits before people -- perhaps that's why HM Government was so ready to believe in the company's robust financial health as it amassed £7B in debts and then collapsed, spectacularly, leaving the UK in financial and infrastructural disarray. (more…)

Making a metal teaspoon that melts in a cup of tea

In this episode of Periodic Videos, professor Sir Martyn Poliakoff from the School of Chemistry at The University of Nottingham describes the process of making a spoon from an alloy that melts in a cup of hot tea. The alloy is called Field's Alloy and it has a melting temperature of 62 °C (144 °F). It was named after its inventor, Simon Quellen Field of SciToys and is made from bismuth, lead, and tin. Here's Simon's article about the alloy.

America's new aristocracy: the 9.9% and their delusion of hereditary meritocracy

It's true that the 1% have accumulated a massive share of America's national wealth; but just as significant is the cohort of professionals -- "well-behaved, flannel-suited crowd of lawyers, doctors, dentists, mid-level investment bankers, M.B.A.s with opaque job titles, and assorted other professionals" -- who style themselves as the "meritocratic middle class" but who actually represent the top decile of American wealth, with net worths from $1.2m to $10m. (more…)

New XBox and Windows game controller for people with disabilities

Microsoft's new accessible game controller has a retro vibe, enormous buttons, and a range of attachments tailored to specific disabilities.

The new Xbox Adaptive Controller, which will be available later this year, can be connected to external buttons, switches, joysticks and mounts, giving gamers with a wide range of physical disabilities the ability to customize their setups. The most flexible adaptive controller made by a major gaming company, the device can be used to play Xbox One and Windows 10 PC games and supports Xbox Wireless Controller features such as button remapping.

Reminds me of the original arcade Street Fighter "punchable" buttons (see the photo from Ars Technica, below). There's a certain irony here, because (in their primitive 80s form) they were unreliable and made the game too difficult, leading arcade operators to replace them with normal buttons. Because the punch-plates were pressure sensitive, though, the game required six normal buttons to play properly, kicking off the myriads-of-buttons era in which games became markedly less accessible.

Thanks to Doc Pop, there's going to be a yo-yo emoji

About a year ago, professional yo-yoist (and hand-knit Pac-Man Icelandic peysa wearer) Doc Pop submitted a proposal for a yo-yo emoji. He's just learned that it was approved!

He explains how he made it happen (fascinating!) in his most recent PopCast:

Last year I started working on a proposal for a yo-yo emoji, with the helps of my friends at Emojination. It’s been an interesting experience and I’m really excited to say that it’s been officially accepted by the Unicode Consortium. Expect to see it in Unicode version 12, early next year.

Here's what the yo-yo emoji will look like:

You can submit an emoji proposal too. Check it out.

New York surpasses Brexit London as the world's second-hottest luxury property market

If you are an oligarch or criminal looking to exfiltrate and launder your money, London property markets have been your go-to asset class: London lux is real-estate that behaves like cash, thanks to the long line of oligarchs and criminals who'll pay cash for your safe-deposit box in the sky on a few hours' notice, should you need to liquidate ahead of a purge or an indictment. (more…)

Airmen expected to protect nuclear weapons accidentally lose grenades

If you want to make a quick $5,000, all you have to do is help the United States Air Force find a box of grenades that some of their employees misplaced.

According to the Washington Post, Airmen from the 91st Missile Wing Security Forces, one of the military units charged with protecting the nation's nuclear launch and storage sites, were traveling down the gravel back roads of North Dakota between one missile site and another when, apparently, a box full of belted MK-19 grenade launcher rounds fell out of the back of their vehicle.

Honestly, who hasn't lost a can full of 40 mike-mike? It could happen to anyone.

Understandably distressed by the loss of their high explosive munitions, the Air Force sent out 100 personnel from Minot Air Force Base to walk the six-mile stretch where it's believed that the grenades up and vanished. No dice.

From the Washington Post:

The Air Force said its Office of Special Investigations does not consider the incident a criminal matter and is seeking public assistance in ensuring the safe return of the explosives. The office has offered the number for an anonymous tip line for any information about the missing grenade rounds and a $5,000 reward for any information leading to their recovery.

What makes the disappearance of the munitions feel particularly special is that, perhaps out of embarrassment or the reasonable belief that maybe telling everyone that there was a big can of boom-boom drifting around the countryside for anyone to pick up, the Air Force didn't bother to inform local law enforcement about the loss for three whole days.

If you could use $5,000 worth of pin money and happen to know where to find the munitions for a belt-fed grenade chucker, maybe give the Air Force Office of Special Investigations a ring at 701-723-7909.

Image via Marines.mil, courtesy of Cpl. Neysa Huertas Quinones

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