MPAA claims to have popped Popcorn Time and YTS

The Motion Picture Association of America today announced that it had effectively shut down the popular Popcorn Time “fork” and movie-sharing torrent destination YTS after court orders in Canada and New Zealand. Read the rest

Africa's cellphone sneakernets for music sharing

In certain regions of Africa, where basic "feature phones" are ubiquitous but Internet connectivity is mostly non-existent, the only network for new music are physical markets where téléchargeurs (downloaders) transfer playlists directly to their customers' devices. Read the rest

Boing Boing's Beschizza talks Megaupload, ACTA, and torrent justice on RT TV

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Boing Boing's managing editor Rob, not Bob, but Rob, Beschizza speaks on the Russian television news network RT about Megaupload, ACTA, the global copyfight wars, and the high-flying hijinks of Kim Dotcom. Read the rest

Megaupload founder Kim Dotcom appears in New Zealand court

Megaupload founder Kim Dotcom, a German national formerly known as Kim Schmitz, is seen at court in Auckland, New Zealand in this still image taken from video shot on January 23, 2012. The file-sharing website founder was ordered to be held in custody by a New Zealand court on Monday, as he denied charges of internet piracy and money laundering and said authorities were trying to portray the most negative picture of him. (REUTERS/TV3 via Reuters Tv) Read the rest

New Yorker on new Pirate Bay religion, the Missionary Church of Kopimism

Cory blogged earlier about the Missionary Church of Kopimism, Sweden’s newest registered religion. Now there's a feature about it in the New Yorker, by Rollo Romig:

The Missionary Church of Kopimism picks up where Piratbyrån left off: it has taken the values of Swedish Pirate movement and codified them into a religion. They call their central sacrament “kopyacting,” wherein believers copy information in communion with each other, most always online, and especially via file-sharing. Ibi Botani’s kopimi mark—a stylized “k” inside a pyramid—is their religious symbol, as are CTRL+C and CTRL+V. Where Christian clergy might sign a letter “yours in Christ,” Kopimists write, “Copy and seed.” They have no god.

“We see the world as built on copies,” Gerson told me. “We often talk about originality; we don’t believe there’s any such thing. It’s certainly that way with life—most parts of the world, from DNA to manufacturing, are built by copying.” The highest form of worship, he said, is the remix: “You use other people’s works to make something better.”

THE FIRST CHURCH OF PIRATE BAY (New Yorker) Read the rest