Sarkeesian

Jigsaw: "wildly ambitious" Google spin-out aimed at tackling "surveillance, extremist indoctrination, censorship"

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Technologists have a dismal pattern: when it comes to engineering challenges ("build a global-scale comms platform") they rub their hands together with excitement; when it comes to the social challenges implied by the engineering ones ("do something about trolls") they throw their hands up and declare the problem to be too hard to solve. Read the rest

“A honeypot for assholes”: Inside Twitter’s 10-year failure to stop harassment

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Charlie Warzel of Buzzfeed has written a long piece about Twitter's apparently inability to prevent neo-Nazis, rape apologists, death threats, and racism from flourishing on the platform.

In 2013, Caroline Criado-Perez launched a campaign to put Jane Austen on UK currency and quickly became the target of more than 50 rape threats per hour — which forced Twitter to roll out a “report abuse” feature for individual tweets. The feature came roughly six years into the company’s history and more than five years after [Ariel] Waldman’s ordeal. “It feels like, not only did they have opportunities early on to tackle this, but they had the ability to step up and be a leader in this space — to be proactive instead of reactive,” Waldman said. “That they haven’t done that is beyond me and it’s reckless.”

Around that time, high-profile harassment cases became a weekly, if not daily, occurrence, especially in the UK. Sinéad O’Connor was driven off the service in 2011; she later told the Daily Mail she was “getting too much abuse.” Downton Abbey actor Lily James quit after she became the target of hundreds of hateful tweets about her appearance. Actor Matt Lucas had to shut down his account after trolls wouldn’t stop harassing him after the death of his partner. In the US, stories of Twitter harassment of women, people of color, and religious minorities appeared with increasing frequency, coming to a head in August 2014, when Robin Williams’ daughter Zelda was forced to quit Twitter after trolls flooded her mentions with photoshopped images of her recently deceased father.

Read the rest

Last chance to help fund series on history's most defiant women

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With a couple of days left, Feminist Frequency is about to hit their funding goal for Ordinary Women, a lavishly animated series about women who dared defy their times--and who history hasn't given their dues. Below is the complete set of preview videos for Ida Wells, Ching Shih, Emma Goldman, Murasaki Shikibu and Ada Lovelace; go help push them over the line at Seed & Spark.

Ida B. Wells (by Sammus)

Ada Lovelace (by Teddy Dief)

Ching Shih (by Jonathan Mann)

Emma Goldman (by The Doubleclicks)

Murasaki Shikibu (by Clara Bizne$$)

The creators of the series are Anita Sarkeesian (of Tropes vs. Women in Video Games fame), Laura Hudson (recently of Boing Boing and Offworld) and Elizabeth Aultman (producer of Yosemite) Read the rest

An animated series about women who dared defy history

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Ordinary Women: Daring to Defy History is a video series about women overlooked by history raising production funds at crowdfunding site Seed & Spark. Creators Anita Sarkeesian, Laura Hudson (recently of Boing Boing and Offworld) and Elizabeth Aultman plan to feature Murasaki Shikibu, credited as the first modern novelist, 19th-century computer pioneer Ada Lovelace, womens' rights advocate Emma Goldman and others.

Unusually for a crowdfunded production, the series will be lavishly animated, reports Bustle, creating a work of art in its own right.

It's an exploration of women throughout history who have decimated gender stereotypes and contributed to humanity in truly impactful ways. The series will seek to remind us not only that these kinds of women — the rabble-rousers, the undercover reporters, the activists, the pirates — are extraordinary individuals, but also that women doing extraordinary things is actually quite ordinary. And that's a good thing. Here's why.

Women kicking ass and taking names shouldn't come as too much of a surprise, because we've been here all along, propping up society with our accomplishments. Unfortunately, the telling of history has a way of being whitewashed, male-focused, and more, excluding the contributions of far too many women, people of color, LGBTQ people, and other marginalized groups. With this new video series, Feminist Frequency hopes to address that glaring imbalance by bringing to life the stories of some of history's most rebellious and remarkable women.

USA Today reports that the creators hope it will inspire more women.

“We want to normalize these women in history,” says Sarkeesian.
Read the rest

Strategic butt coverings in video games

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Feminist Frequency's excellent Tropes vs Women in Video Games has a new installment on the prevailing ways that characters' butts are presented in games: with female characters, they're emphasized, centered and revealed; with male characters, it's often literally impossible to see their butts.

Read the rest

How to stay safe online

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The scale and virulence of internet harassment often lingers in the news, but three women who have faced down the bullies are sharing their guide to staying safe online.

The advice is eminently sensible, well thought-out and derives, sadly, from all-too-familiar experience.

Feeling overwhelmed? Don’t have time to read the whole thing? Start with these three steps:

Set up two step verification Create unique, complex passwords Remove potential doxxing information

Created by Feminist Frequency's Anita Sarkeesian, Women, Action & the Media founder Jaclyn Friedman and Saying Abortion Aloud author Renee Bracey Sherman, the guide was made necessary by "the failure of social media services to adequately prevent and deal with the hateful targeting of their more marginalized users."

As this guide details, forcing individual victims or potential targets to shoulder the costs of digital security amounts to a disproportionate tax of in time, money, and emotional labor. It is a tax that is levied disproportionately against women, people of color, queer and trans people and other oppressed groups for daring to express an opinion in public.

Even if you're an old hand with the online safety basics, the miscellaneous tips are still unexpected and useful. For example, did you know can use free, throwaway VOIP numbers from Google to conceal your real cell number? Read the rest

Feminist Frequency now has DLC

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Who can resist the allure of downloadable content? Not Feminist Frequency, which just released a tongue-in-cheek "DLC" mini-episode that examines how women (and their bodies) are often used as rewards in, well, video game DLC.

If you missed the original "Women as Reward" video from Anita Sarkeesian (a friend and colleague of Offworld) check it out below, and then enjoy all the sweet, sweet bonus analysis of gender in media.

This totally free supplemental add-on content pack for our Women as Reward video examines how women’s bodies are used not just as a reward for in-game actions but also, via paid downloadable content, as a reward for spending actual money. We then address the most common defense of this kind of objectification and commodification of women’s bodies: the argument that “sex sells.”
Read the rest

Anita Sarkeesian on women's bodies as prizes in video games

Kate from Feminist Frequency (previously) writes, "Feminist Frequency has just released a supplemental mini-episode in their Tropes vs Women in Video Games series." Read the rest

That time the Internet sent a SWAT team to my mom's house

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When I set out to research the out-of-control harassment problem in gamer culture, I never dreamed my mother would be caught up in the middle of it all.

Last week on the colony: Monday, July 6

Last Week on the Colony is a new, regular Monday item here on Offworld, a special satellite transmission designed to highlight our favorite Offworld stories, wonderful trends, and the stories from elsewhere in the galaxy that got us talking

All the women I know in video games are tired

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But it's not for the reasons you think.

Brianna Wu uploads Gamergate death threat to shame Ohio prosecutor

The game developer and Gamergate bogeywoman/survivor has furnished the authorities with the graphic death-threats she received for speaking out about online harassment of women, but they won't take action. Read the rest

Joss Whedon on claims that feminists chased him off Twitter: "Horseshit"

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When Joss Whedon took down his Twitter account, speculation ranged widely: was it because of feminists attacking him over Avengers 2's portrayal of Black Widow? Nope, reports Adam B. Vary.

“That is horseshit,” he told BuzzFeed News by phone on Tuesday. “Believe me, I have been attacked by militant feminists since I got on Twitter. That’s something I’m used to. Every breed of feminism is attacking every other breed, and every subsection of liberalism is always busy attacking another subsection of liberalism, because god forbid they should all band together and actually fight for the cause.

“I saw a lot of people say, ‘Well, the social justice warriors destroyed one of their own!’ It’s like, Nope. That didn’t happen,” he continued. “I saw someone tweet it’s because Feminist Frequency pissed on Avengers 2, which for all I know they may have. But literally the second person to write me to ask if I was OK when I dropped out was [Feminist Frequency founder] Anita [Sarkeesian].”

He's just sick of Twitter, "the least quiet place I’ve ever been in my life." He praises feminists for standing up to bullshit on Twitter—and admits to frustration at being accused of misogyny for not living up to feminist 'litmus tests' judging his own commitment to the cause.

Joss Whedon Calls “Horsesh*t” On Reports He Left Twitter Because Of Militant Feminists Read the rest

Twitter's got a new troll stick

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New policies at Twitter for reporting, automatic message muting, and enforcement could turn the noise way down for users subject to harassment.

Anita Sarkeesian in Time's Top 100 most influential

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The creator behind a series of feminist critiques of game design tropes—and target of a relentless campaign of online harassment—is profiled by Wil Wheaton.

Anita is just the latest woman writer to prove the law coined by journalist Helen Lewis: that the sexist comments on any article about feminism justify feminism. In the face of hysterical and childish abuse, Anita has refused to back down. She continues to speak around the world about the role of women in video games and popular media. She also talks about her life as a target in the online culture war known as Gamergate, waged by entitled male gamers who fear change in an industry that is evolving while they seem determined to remain 15 forever.

[via] Read the rest

Tank Girl/Doctor Who director Rachel Talalay on industry sexism: “You have to be some version of perfect.”

Rachel Talalay is one of the few women to work as a director on Doctor Who, a show that has been notoriously slow to diversify its creative players Read the rest

Anita Sarkeesian's new video is about what games do right

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The Feminist Frequency videos typically focus on where video games go wrong with gender, but the latest episode by Anita Sarkeesian takes a different angle: the times when they really succeed. Read the rest

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