3D printed Adventure Time cookie-cutter


Make your own delicious, edible BMO biscuits with this $9 starch-based 3D printed cookie cutter from Star Cookies, who also does Dragonball, Ghostbusters and more. (via Geekymerch)

TARDIS and Dalek lotion-bars


Etsy seller Wizard at Work makes delightful solid lotion bars in a variety of shapes, most notably this Doctor Who two-pack featuring a Dalek and a TARDIS. Made with only four ingredients (sweet almond oil, beeswax, shea butter and cocoa butter) and $8 per set. (via Geeky Merch)

Semi-rigid, cubical rubber bands


From designer Nendo, "the geometrical shapes make the bands easy to find in a drawer and easy to pick up." Eye-watering pricetag, though: about $10 for three from Mark's.

cubic rubber-band (via Colossal)

(Image: Akihiro Yoshida)

Carl Hiaasen's "Skink No Surrender"

Carl Hiaasen’s novels are treasures of hilarity, violence, comeuppance and ardent love for Florida wilderness. The very best of them feature “Skink,” a wild man of the woods with a fantastic history and a twisted sense of justice. With Skink No Surrender, Hiaasen brings his greatest character to a new generation by transforming the violent, profane anti-hero into the star of a young adult novel.

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Pi fleece provides warmth, irrationality


Thinkgeek's Pi Fleece keeps you warm and irrational with the first 413 digits of Pi in machine-washable fleece, measuring 45"x64".

Massive, tentacle-covered annotated works of HP Lovecraft


Les Klinger's enormous volume has earned critical praise from Neil Gaiman, Gahan Wilson, Peter Straub and Harlan Ellison; the book is big enough to stun an (eldritch demon) ox, and is introduced by none other than Alan Moore.

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Scarfolk: creepy blog is now an amazing book

Back in August, I blogged the announcement of the forthcoming Discovering Scarfolk, a book-length adaptation of the brilliantly creepy Scarfolk Council blog, which chronicles the government publications of a English town that is forever trapped in a loop from 1969-1979, a town that's like Nightvale crossed with Liartown USA, written by John Wyndham. Today, it's out!

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Booze flasks that look like NES cartridges


I bought one of these at New York Comic-Con this weekend -- it's a surprisingly good facsimile of an old NES cart; and the rubber stopper (rated to 10psi) performs better than it looks like it would. My only complaint is that it's a bit awkward to nip from directly, though it'd be fine with a straw.

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Anatomical diagram cushion-covers



These vintage anatomical diagram cushion covers are $25/each from Manchester's My Wife Your Wife: there's the finger cross-section, the hair follicle, and the throat and mouth cavity.

(via Geeky Merch)

Best monster merch of New York Comic-Con


Far and away the best monster merchandise I found at New York Comic-Con came from Scumbags & Superstars , whose tees, patches and stickers perfectly captured everything I love about monster art.

Scumbags & Superstars

Beautiful Rocky Horror lithos


Backers of the Rocky Horror Saved My Life documentary post-production effort can one of these beautiful posters for a $20 contribution. I saw them in person today at New York Comic-Con and they're gorgeous.

"Bengal Boy" conjoined skull gaff


One of the highlights of each New York Comic-Con for me is seeing the latest gaffs and replicas from the Gemini Company (previously) -- this year's highlight was the $400 "Bengal Boy" conjoined skull gaff, shown here.

Streetwear for superheroes


I found Volante Designs at New York Comic-Con today and was instantly taken with their dramatic coats and hoodies, styled to look like something a superhero would wear, all made in the USA.

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Nerdy steering-wheel covers


Oklahoma City's Beau Fleurs sells a remarkable variety of steering-wheel covers, each adorned with a hellokittyish hair-bow (pictured here: the Marvel comics edition, $25).

(via Geeky Merch)

Plate armor hoodie


Thinkgeek's $80 Medieval Knight Hoodie lets you stay warm and stylish by simulating a suit of plate armor. The spaulders and visor snap on and off, and the sleeves are pulled into shape by thumb cuffs.