Watch this psychedelic video of paint mixing


Thomas Blanchard created this deeply trip video, "The Colors of Feelings," using paint, oil, milk, honey, and cinnamon. Read the rest

Tip: cover paint can with tissue before hammering it shut


Well, you hardly even need to watch Popular Mechanics' 10-second video now, do you?

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Graffiti enthusiast won't take red for an answer


In the eternal struggle between graffiti enthusasts and wall owners, sometimes a playful conversation emerges, like this battle over the word RED vs. red paint. Read the rest

The anxiety of unplugging and why we should disconnect to connect

Clinical psychologist Catherine Steiner-Adair, author of The Big Disconnect, studies why it's so hard for us to disregard the digital disruptions around us. Tanya Schevitz, spokesperson for Reboot's National Day of Unplugging, talked to Steiner-Adair about our aversion to disconnecting and the power of real presence.

Why are barns red?

If you've ever spent much time in American farm country, then you've probably noticed that there's a strong tradition there of coating barns and outbuildings with red paint. Why?

Because nuclear fusion.

Okay, the actual answer is simply because red paint has long been a cheap color to buy. But, explains Google engineer Yonatan Zunger, there is some really interesting physics lurking in the background of that price point.

What makes a cheap pigment? Obviously, that it’s plentiful. The red pigment that makes cheap paint is red ochre, which is just iron and oxygen. These are incredibly plentiful: the Earth’s crust is 6% iron and 30% oxygen. Oxygen is plentiful and affects the color of compounds it’s in by shaping them, but the real color is determined by the d-electrons of whatever attaches to it: red from iron, blues and greens from copper, a beautiful deep blue from cobalt, and so on. So if we know that good pigments will all come from elements in that big d-block in the middle, the real question is, why is one of these elements, iron, so much more common than all of the others? Why isn’t our world made mostly of, say, copper, or vanadium?

The answer, again, is nuclear fusion.

You can read the full story on Zunger's Google+ page. In my experience, white is another really common barn color, due to the fact that whitewash — a paint made from calcium hydroxide and chalk (which is also calcium) — is way cheap, as well. Read the rest

HOWTO make cheap Louboutin knockoffs

British women are painting their shoe soles bright red to replicate that expensive Louboutin look. For your own Beckhampunk effort, use Duracoat 'Flame' or 'Show Stopper' and a size 4 brush. [Telegraph] Read the rest