Boing Boing 

Watching a sphere of water bubble in space in 4K resolution: Yup, pretty cool

A water bubble with the remnants of an antacid tablet reaction floats in front of astronaut Terry Virts’ eye. The reaction of putting the effervescent tablet into the water was filmed with the Red Epic Dragon Camera.

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How to name an exoplanet, by XKCD

Randall Munroe has a hot take on the recent space news around Kepler 452-B and Pluto.

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NASA unveils gorgeous new false-color image of Pluto

NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI


NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI

It may be 'shopped, and we can tell by the pixels, but it's just the most beautiful image of Pluto mankind has ever seen. It's also 2.2 km/pixel, and the most detailed ever.

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WATCH: Strobe-lit cymatics experiments reveal more complex patterns

Don't watch if you're sensitive to strobes, but otherwise check out these interesting periodic patterns which appear in strobe-lit materials excited by sound waves.

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First near-Earth-size planet in “habitable zone” around sun-like star confirmed by NASA

Space truth, more awesome than fiction.Read the rest

When scientists hoard data, no one can tell what works


Peer review and replication are critical to the scientific method, but in medical trials, a combination of pharma company intransigence and scientists' fear of being pilloried for human error means that the raw data that we base life-or-death decisions upon is routinely withheld, meaning that the errors lurk undetected in the data for years -- and sometimes forever.

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More fun with Plugable's USB microscope

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Over the weekend, my 12-year-old daughter and I used our Plugable USB Handheld Digital Microscope to get a close-up look some of the stuff around the house. It's an excellent microscope, especially considering the low price ($35). Another other great thing about a USB microscope is that you don't have to take turns looking at the specimen - everyone in the room can see it on the computer display at the same time. That makes it so much more fun. And you can easily take photos and movie to share with other people. The image above is a rubber clown nose.

I like this microscope so much that I talked to the folks at Plugable and asked them to become a sponsor of our Weekend of Wonder extravaganza (WoW) on September 18-20 in Southern California. The kindly agreed, and now everyone who attends is going to get one of these super cool scopes, courtesy of Plugable! We will have a gross-out contest at WoW with these scopes, so start thinking about the yuckiest thing we can look at.

Here are a few of the things we looked at:

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Ball point pen (250X)

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Ball point pen (50X)

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Dirt

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Sharpie marker

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Sharpie dot on paper

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Gluten-free bread

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Comic book cover

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iPhone display

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Chewable vitamin

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Jane's hair

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White stuff on a tree leaf

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Tiny scab on Jane's leg

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Levi's denim jean fabric

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Jane's heel

Register here to join us at Boing Boing's Weekend of Wonder.

WATCH: Neil deGrasse Tyson give us a a brief history of everything

Neil deGrasse Tyson tell us how it is.

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As we marveled at Pluto, this spectacular comet image came out

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While we were busy enjoying the spectacular images of Pluto, ESA's Rosetta camera released this image of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

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Can science make us better drinkers?

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The headline sounds like a prime candidate for Betteridge's Law, but a neurologist and his cocktail-bar creative director daughter are on it.

Nathan Mattise reports from the annual Tales of the Cocktail gathering in New Orleans, "a drinking conference with a science problem."

Perhaps the average barkeep doesn't need to know that the body contains more than 350 receptor proteins solely to process smell (detecting more than half a million odorants, any of which may bind to these proteins for all of a millisecond). But that knowledge coincided nicely with Pamela Wiznitzer's recommendations to carefully consider the aroma of your garnishes. When possible, use scents that intentionally clash with a drink's ultimate flavor (thus creating an alluring complexity).

Among the insights: don't use liquid nitrogen to cool drinks, you might kill someone.

Incredible Science Machine team seeks Rube Goldberg record with chain reaction gizmo

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Chain reaction artists and domino builders have collaborated to create what they hope will go on record as the largest chain reaction in history.

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National Geographic's Pluto issue, autographed by NASA's New Horizons team

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Susan Goldberg: “How cool is this? The @NASANewHorizons #Pluto team autographed our fab July @NatGeo cover, written by @nadiamdrake.”

More: Pluto coverage on Boing Boing.

Video: HOWTO make waterproof sand at home

YouTuber IncredibleScience has a great at-home science project that's kid-friendly: making waterproof sand.

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Scientists create new strain of algae that tastes like bacon

Oregon State University researchers created and patented a new strain of the protein-rich red marine algae known as Dulse. When cooked, this new stuff really tastes like bacon. The engineered strain is high in protein, and purportedly offers twice the nutritional value of everyone's favorite vegetable-du-jour, kale.

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3D printing blends rigid and soft to improve robot performance

Harvard's School of Engineering and Applied Sciences released an interesting demo of blending rigid and soft materials during 3D printing to create hybrid robots with enhanced performance for tasks like jumping and landing.

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Let's build a Moon village, says European Space Agency's new director

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"I propose a Moon village on the far side of the Moon," says Johann-Dietrich Woerner who has been in the role of Director General of the European Space Agency (Esa) for just a week.

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University of Toronto upholds "alternative medicine" course that denied vaccines, taught "quantum medicine"


The course was taught under the Anthropology department by "homeopath" Beth Landau-Halpern, who is married to the dean of the Scarborough campus, and who had been previously caught on hidden camera selling sugar pills to parents and calling them "vaccine alternatives."

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