Pluto's equator is covered in skyscraper-sized methane ice blades

As NASA continues to examine the treasure trove of data from the New Horizons project, one interesting phenomenon at Pluto's equator has been identified as massive ice blades made of methane. Read the rest

New close-ups from NASA's New Horizons spacecraft show off Pluto's mysterious complexity

NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

The New Horizons spacecraft sent back new close-up images of Pluto, and they are stunning. Read the rest

Fantastic video of Pluto fly-by made from still images

Astronomical artist Björn Jónsson stitched together still images captured by the New Horizons spacecraft as it flew past the dwarf planet Pluto last month. Read the rest

How "real" are images of Pluto?

Images of celestial bodies are not typically photographed in the same way as, say, your cat. Wired's Jenna Garrett explains the complexity—and authenticity—of the technology that captures Pluto for our awestruck observation. Read the rest

Dark Side of the Pluto

"There is no dark side of the Pluto really. Matter of fact it's all dark."

Dark Side of the Pluto revealed in new NASA image from New Horizons mission

Pluto haze! In my brain. Lately, things, they don't seem the same.

How to name an exoplanet, by XKCD

XKCD's hot take on the recent space news around Kepler 452-B and Pluto.

NASA unveils gorgeous new false-color image of Pluto

It may be 'shopped, and we can tell by the pixels, but it's just the most beautiful image of Pluto mankind has ever seen.

National Geographic's Pluto issue, autographed by NASA's New Horizons team

“How cool is this?”

Fly over Pluto in animated New Horizons video. Here are the amazing images NASA released from Pluto Fly By today.

NASA released more amazing space imagery and scientific data, slowly and steadily coming down to earth from the New Horizons space probe after its historic fly-by of Pluto.

NASA rock-teases us with tantalizing up-close Pluto shot

At a press conference this afternoon, NASA revealed the first close-up details of the surface of Pluto. Read the rest

Live coverage of Pluto image press conference with NASA New Horizons team

We are as close as we've ever been to Pluto, and images even more spectacular than this are on the way.

Pluto fly-by immortalized in 4 perfect frames by Cyanide & Happiness webcomic

Won't someone think of the poor exoplanets?

This little cartoon captures all of Pluto's lonely feels, as New Horizons probe flys by

Aww. Poor little Pluto.

Read the rest

NASA's New Horizons spacecraft phones home from Pluto, and all is “nominal”

“We have a healthy spacecraft, we recorded data on the Pluto system, and we're outbound from Pluto.”

NASA Ground team stands by for Pluto fly-by confirmation signal from New Horizons

NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft is expected to radio home any minute now. We're watching on NASA TV. The moment will end a nearly 22-hour radio blackout as the probe focused on a series of close-up observations of Pluto and its moons.

From SpaceFlight Now:

Engineers expect to lock on to a carrier signal, then start receiving housekeeping data on the status of the New Horizons spacecraft. No science data will come down during Tuesday night’s pass.

“The reason why you’re not seeing more things immediately is because the spacecraft is spending all its time making the observations of the Pluto system,” says Hal Weaver, New Horizons’ project sciences from the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland. “That’s what we wanted to do. Of course, you want to optimize the scientific return from the mission.

A signal from New Horizons will be a celebratory moment for the hundreds of engineers and scientists working on the mission. The cessation of communications was part of the plan going into the flyby because New Horizons carries a fixed antenna, meaning mission managers have to choose between contacting Earth and conducting scientific work at Pluto.

Watch live: Ground team standing by for New Horizons signal

Clyde William Tombaugh (February 4, 1906 – January 17, 1997) was an American astronomer. Although he is best known for discovering the dwarf planet Pluto in 1930. Read the rest

Pluto and other known “not-planets” in our solar system mapped in scale image montage

“Their non-planetary status is a handicap because these are the worlds that we need to get Earthlings excited about exploring.”

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