This Welsh password generator might keep you safe from hackers, but definitely from dragons

Inspired by XKCD's classic diceware strip, a programmer named Alice created an open-source algorithm to randomly generate secure passphrases in Welsh. As difficult as it would be for any human or computer to figure out a nonsense phrase like, "correct horse battery staple," it would be even more difficult to guess, "stwffwl batri ceffyl cywir," especially when there are only about 700,000 Welsh speakers to begin with.

While I'm no cryptologist, I did run a few of the passwords through HowSecureIsMyPassword.net and My1Login.net and they seemed to work out all right. According to those sites, it would take 11 quattuordecillion years or 1 trillion trillion trillion years for a computer to crack "DrefnasidRhyd-y-meirchSefydlogiad6*." Similarly, "GlaeruchdyrauGymreigeiddiaiBarcdir0**" would take 429 tredecillion years, or 94 billion trillion trillion years, respectively.

However, as Alice the programmer warns: "It's probably not a good idea to actually use this, since the wordlist is freely available along with the algorithm being used."

So it might not stop a really clever hacker from getting into your email. But it will almost certainly stop a mythic Welsh dragon from stealing your identity. Probably. I'm assuming their claws are pretty clumsy on the keyboard.

Welsh Password Generator [WheresAlice.info]

Image via Lewis Ogden/Flickr (altered)

*Google Translate tells me this means, "The ford of the horses was arranged." I don't know that I trust it—Google Translate is famously sloppy with the grammar of some Celtic languages—but it certainly sounds epic.

**Similarly, this became "Parkland was a Welsh occupation" which sounds like something you would hear on the Breton version of InfoWars. Read the rest

Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwyllllantysiliogogogoch

Welcome to the town with the longest name in Europe: Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwyllllantysiliogogogoch in Wales. It was, originally, a name contrived to draw tourists. But that was 150 years ago, it's legit, and it's long been enjoying the consequences.

Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwyllllantysiliogogogoch recently achieved viral fame after Channel 4 producers decided to drop it on meteorologist Liam Dutton, who nailed it effortlessly. Which stands to reason, him being Welsh? Anyway, it's a joy to watch and hear:

His flawless pronunciation of the 58-letter place name - the longest in Europe - garnered a total of more than 20 million views on YouTube and Facebook within a week and dominated the media around the world.

Liam was interviewed by Wales Online, BBC Radio 5 Live, Canadian breakfast television and beyond, as well as featuring in Time magazine, the New York Times, MTV and Perez Hilton.

He was praised by Catherine Zeta Jones, and TV anchors around the world were so impressed by his mind-blowing effort that they tried to outdo him, but with little success.

Read the rest