"james bridle"

It's January, so it's time to settle in with the annual WELL State of the Union address, with special guest James Bridle!

For decades, the WELL has rung in the new year with a weeks-long public discussion led by Jon Lebkowsky and Bruce Sterling (2018, 2017, 2016, 2014, 2012, 2010, 2007, 2005, etc). Read the rest

My short story about better cities, where networks give us the freedom to schedule our lives to avoid heat-waves and traffic jams

I was lucky enough to be invited to submit a piece to Ian Bogost's Atlantic series on the future of cities (previously: James Bridle, Bruce Sterling, Molly Sauter, Adam Greenfield); I told Ian I wanted to build on my 2017 Locus column about using networks to allow us to coordinate our work and play in a way that maximized our freedom, so that we could work outdoors on nice days, or commute when the traffic was light, or just throw an impromptu block party when the neighborhood needed a break. Read the rest

How citizenship-for-sale and statelessness change cities

James Bridle (previously) is the latest contributor to The Atlantic's excellent series on the future of cities (Bruce Sterling, Molly Sauter, Adam Greenfield); in a new piece, Greenfield discusses the phenomenon of "virtual citizenship," and how it affects cities that are either turned into dumping-grounds for inconvenient poor people, or rootless, tax-dodging one-percenters. Read the rest

"The Kid Should See This" is an antidote to idiotic kid-meme Youtube

Plenty of parents are unsettled by abysmal quality of videos aimed at kids on Youtube -- which range from the merely dull/hacky/ultra-branded to the slurry of possibly-autogenerated brain porridge that James Bridle recently documented.

The design director and video-producer Rion Nakaya got sick of this same sludge, so she created The Kid Should See This, a site that curates genuinely gorgeous and thought-provoking videos -- ones that aren't necessarily aimed at kids, so anyone, of any age, would also dig them.

My favorites so far include "How does a bowling alley work?", "A 15-color rainbow spiral made with 12,000 dominoes", "How To Make a Navigational Chart", and "Ballet Rotoscope". I'm particularly into the ones like "Journey of a Letter: How a birthday card is sent and delivered in London", which illustrate the marvels of the hidden infrastructure that underpins everyday life.

As Nakaya tells Lifehacker:

In selecting videos for TKSST, which are all pretty short, Nakaya not only looks for what she calls “wonder and ‘Wow!’ moments” but also seeks to clarify information that’s often misunderstood, like climate change science, evolution, and clean energy solutions, and amplify women and people of color working in STEM fields. While there’s some kids’ content in the mix—like this classic 1981 crayon factory visit from Mister Roger’s Neighborhood—she avoids all the clichéd and gimmicky stuff, like shows with over-the-top sound effects and zany mad-scientist hosts who make terrible puns. “Why dumb it down when the subjects can be compelling on their own?” she asks.

Read the rest

Youtube Kids spammers rack up billions of views on disturbing, violent, seemingly algorithmic videos

James Bridle takes a deep dive into the weird world of Youtube Kids videos, whose popular (think: millions and millions of views) genres and channels include endless series of videos of children being vomited on by family members and machinima-like music videos in which stock cartoon characters meet gory, violent ends. Read the rest

On the once and future history of clouds

James Bridle (previously) honors the The Cloud Index, "a tool for actionable weather forecasts" at London's Serpentine Gallery, with a lyrical longread about the history of clouds, science, war and computation. Read the rest

Read: The End of Big Data: space weapons, UN inspectors and personal data

James "New Aesthetic" Bridle writes, "I wrote an SF short story about satellites, space weapons, UN inspectors, and the end of personal data! I hope you like it." Read the rest

Big Data refusal: the nuclear disarmament movement of the 21st century

James Bridle's new essay (adapted from a speech at the Through Post-Atomic Eyes event in Toronto last month) draws a connection between the terror of life in the nuclear shadow and the days we live in now, when we know that huge privacy disasters are looming, but are seemingly powerless to stop the proliferation of surveillance. Read the rest

The strange stories behind country-code top-level domains

James Bridle writes, "A couple of months ago I released a browser extension - Citizen Ex - which tracks your browsing (entirely privately) in order to show you your "Algorithmic Citizenship" - where your browsing actually goes, and what this means for your rights." Read the rest

Drowned in the Mediterranean: Libyan refugees tell their stories

James Bridle writes: "There's huge debate in the UK about the deaths of people in the Mediterranean trying to reach Europe, but we rarely see or hear the people themselves." Read the rest

London, Tue night: Cory and Biella Coleman talk about "Hackers and Hoaxers: Inside Anonymous"

Anthropologist Gabriella Coleman (author of the brilliant Coding Freedom) spent years embedded with Anonymous and has written an indispensable account of the Anonymous phenomenon. Read the rest

DIY Drone Shadow Handbook: how to create accurate drone-shadow street art

James Bridle has released a CC-licensed DIY Drone Shadows handbook (PDF), which explains, in detail, how to make accurate drone-shadow street art in your town/neighborhood. It's part of a larger project around Dirty Wars, a documentary on drone warfare currently touring the UK. Read the rest

Walk 1.4 mi. in London, take photos of 140+ CCTVs

James Bridle photographed every CCTV between his home in east London and Dalston Junction, a 1.4mi walk with about 140 cameras. Welcome to London, where we have 11 CCTVs per red blood cells.

Every CCTV camera between my house and Dalston Junction

(via Super Punch) Read the rest

Bruce Sterling interviewed about the New Aesthetic

David Cox interviews Bruce Sterling about the significance, lifecycle and future of the New Aesthetic movement:

First to the issue of “is the New Aesthetic really new?” I’d say those images are “new’” pretty much by definition. Aesthetics obviously is very old. James Bridle doing a project called the “New Aesthetic Tumblr” is over, and receding into the past. But machine-generated imagery that is unlike previous forms of imagery is all over the place. So, yes it is new, for any reasonable definition of novelty.

As for whether James Bridle’s image collection had any analytical rigor, I’m inclined to think he had more analysis going on there than he liked to let on; but I rather think James prefers writing, journalism and publishing to the trying role of a public New Aesthetic visionary. When you have a breakout viral hit on the Net nowadays, the opportunity-cost can be pretty stiff.

On the issue as to what a New Aesthetic ought to do, what the “strategy” is, well, that’s unsettled, but I think that James’s year-long intervention there has raised the morale of tech-art people quite a lot. It’s legitimated their practice in their own eyes, and helped to free them from their traditional hangups on specific pieces of hardware. At least it’s possible to imagine a strategy now — instead of merely saying, I’m an artist, but I do digital electronics, you can re-frame your efforts as something like “a new aesthetic of processual vital beauty,” and you’re not so handcuffed to the soldering irons.

Read the rest

Pepys Road: online story about Londoners weathering the crash

Matt sez,

PepysRd.com is an innovative online story based on Capital by John Lanchester, the first big London post-crash novel. Capital interweaves the lives and stories of the residents of Pepys Road, looking at the recent financial crash and its effect on our everyday lives. To support the book, Storythings have been commissioned by Faber and Faber to produce PepysRd.com – a unique interactive story based on Capital that asks you to think about how your own life will be affected by events of the coming ʻlost decadeʼ. How will the financial crisis affect the way we live? Our health? Where we go on holidays? Or our education?

Author John Lanchester has written ten original mini-stories which explore each of the next ten years. Over ten days Pepysrd.com will ask you to think about your future, and how the decisions you make every day affect the world and the people around you. As you progress through the ten installments you make a series of choices that shape the course of your story, and determine where on Pepys Road you might end up living. Each day you discover how your answers compare with those of other users following the story: did you vote with the crowd, or against? Drawing on the themes of the novel and using this individual data PepysRd.com will offer a captivating projection of your life in 2021.

Alongside John Lanchesterʼs stories of the future, artist James Bridle has created four interactive data illustrations which tell stories about our past, present and future using the data trails we create online and in the real world.

Read the rest

12 volume set of books reprints Wikipedia's edits of the Iraq War entry

James Bridle published "the 12,000 edits made to the controversial Wikipedia entry for the Iraq War between December 2004 to November 2009 as a 7,000 page, 12 volume set of books."

Archiving Iraq: One Wikipedia Entry's Edit Wars, Printed in 12 Volumes Read the rest

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