Charlie Daniels warns Taco Bell about llluminati

Taco Bell's new Illuminati-themed ad campaign spurred a warning from southern rocker Charlie Daniels: "Hey Taco Bell The Illuminati is not a frivolous subject," Daniels tweeted last night.

My favorite response? "Welcome to Taco Bell, Mr. Daniels, can I take your NEW WORLD ORDER?"

Of course, Daniels, best known for the 1979 rousing hit "The Devil Went Down to Georgia"(1979), is vocal about his conservative politics.

(MSN)

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Author Brian Francis Slattery's favorite fictional secret societies

The Freemasons. Fight Club. The Bilderberg Group. The Illuminati. The Watcher’s Council. The Knights Templar. The Order of the Phoenix.

Bookburners is available from Amazon.

Bookburners, out now from Saga Press, is about a team of experts trying to keep magic from breaking out all over the world. It’s a secret team inside a (fictional) secret organization inside a (real) institution prone to secrecy. When Serial Box assembled its writing team for the first volume of Bookburners — Max Gladstone, Margaret Dunlap, Mur Lafferty, and me — we didn’t have to look far for inspiration. I didn’t have to look much farther than my own town.

Those of us who live in and around New Haven, CT are no strangers to secret societies. We see Yale’s secret society buildings right on the street -- nearly windowless constructions that look like temples, or like tiny libraries. The societies that own them have names like Skull and Bones, Scroll and Key, Book and Snake, Berzelius, and no one outside of the societies is really sure what goes on them.

Wolf's Head

Berzelius

Book and Snake

Scroll and Key

Skull and Bones

A small secret organization even governs the enormous town green in the center of the city: the Committee of the Proprietors of Common and Undivided Lands at New Haven, a group of five people appointed for life to preserve and maintain the Green. When members die, they are replaced by other people who then serve for life. The Proprietors were formed at the start of the New Haven Colony in the 1600s, and they’re still going strong. Read the rest

Secret society curios: classic Masonic and Odd Fellows folk art

Allison Meier at Hyperallergic has a fascinating look at The American Folk Art Museum’s exhibit of classic secret society folk art. Read the rest

Gallery of secret society art

Anika Burgess of Atlas Obscura posted a gallery of images from the book As Above, So Below: Art of the American Fraternal Society 1850-1930, which has a forward by David Byrne.

With the growth of membership came a rise in the creation of artwork, which is explored in the book As Above, So Below: Art of the American Fraternal Society 1850-1930. Divided into the types of imagery, such as banners, magic lanterns and ritual objects, the book also examines how new technologies, such as the invention of the chromolithograph, created new means of expression.

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The International Concatenated Order of Hoo-Hoo: greatly improved, but something important has been lost

When The fraternal organization was founded in 1892, it was a racist, sexist club for men associated in some way with the lumber industry. Today, Hoo Hoo International accepts members of all genders and backgrounds, and does good works related to tree planting, as well as generally promoting responsible forestry, which is quite an improvement. Read the rest

Play a digital version of a lost "perception-altering" Freemasonry board-game

Jason writes, "'The Bafflement Fires' is a digital recreation of a Freemason board game from the 1950s." Read the rest

Thrift-score: mad, wonderful scrapbooks of 19th C Texas butcher who loved flying machines, secret societies

Robbo sez, "Charles Dellschau, a retired butcher in Texas in the late 1800's created a series of scrapbooks: '2,500 intricate drawings of flying machines alongside cryptic newspaper clippings filled the pages, crudely sewn together with shoelaces and thread' - it's an astonishing collection of mystery and whimsey with loads of drawings and plans for arcane flying machines, a secret society and coded messages strewn throughout. The books were found by a junk dealer in the 1960's and are now valued at $15,000 - per page."

These are astounding illustrations and amazing fantasies; they've been collected in a book called THE SECRETS OF DELLSCHAU: The Sonora Aero Club and the Airships of the 1800s, A True Story, which includes a lot of commentary on Dellschau's work and context.

He began with three books entitled Recollections which purported to describe a secret organization called the Sonora Aero Club. Dellschau described his duties in the club as that of the draftsman. Within his collaged watercolors were newspaper clippings (he called them “press blooms”) of early attempts at flight overlapped with his own fantastic drawings of airships of all kind. Powered by a secret formula he cryptically referred to as “NB Gas” or “Suppa” — the “aeros” (as Dellscahu called them) were steampunk like contraptions with multiple propellers, wheels, viewing decks and secret compartments. Though highly personal, autobiographical (perhaps!), and idiosyncratic, these artworks could cross-pollinate with the fiction of Jules Verne, Willy Wonka and the Wizard of Oz. The works were completed in a furiously creative period from 1899 to 1923, when air travel was still looked at by most people as almost magical.

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