Watch this astounding video of lightning bolts in ultra-high definition at 1,000 frames-per-second

Filmmaker Dustin Farrell spent his summer traveling 20,000 miles to film lightning around the United States. He used a Phantom Flex4K camera to capture these brilliant bolts at 1,000 frames per second. The film is called "Transient."

“Lightning is like a snowflake. Every bolt is different,” Farrell says. “I learned that lightning varies greatly in speed. There are some incredible looking bolts that I captured that didn’t make the cut because even at 1000fps they only lasted for one frame during playback. I also captured some lightning that appear computer generated it lasted so long on the screen.”

(via The Kid Should See This)

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NASA simulation of this year's hurricane season

NASA published an animation depicting this years' rough hurricane season in two smooth minutes. It's beautifully wispy and liquid, a fascinating contrast to the radar machine-vision we usually get of weather patterns. From the press release:

How can you see the atmosphere? By tracking what is carried on the wind. Tiny aerosol particles such as smoke, dust, and sea salt are tranpsorted across the globe, making visible weather patterns and other normally invisible physical processes.

This visualization uses data from NASA satellites, combined with mathematical models in a computer simulation allow scientists to study the physical processes in our atmosphere. By following the sea salt that is evaporated from the ocean, you can see the storms of the 2017 hurricane season.

During the same time, large fires in the Pacific Northwest released smoke into the atmosphere. Large weather patterns can transport these particles long distances: in early September, you can see a line of smoke from Oregon and Washington, down the Great Plains, through the South, and across the Atlantic to England.

Dust from the Sahara is also caught in storms sytems and moved from Africa to the Americas. Unlike the sea salt, however, the dust is removed from the center of the storm. The dust particles are absorbed by cloud droplets and then washed out as it rains. Advances in computing speed allow scientists to include more details of these physical processes in their simulations of how the aerosols interact with the storm systems.

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Ship exhaust makes ocean lightning more common and intense in shipping lanes

The American Geophysical Union reports that a long-term study of major shipping lanes indicates that ship exhaust is dramatically altering lightning patterns. It's not clear what the long-term effects might be. Read the rest

Remarkable timelapse of a cargo ship at sea

JeffHK mounted a camera on a cargo ship, and 80,000 photos later he had a fascinating timelapse of what it's like to be at sea for 30 days. Read the rest

Harvey hits hard, TX governor issues mandatory evacuations as 'catastrophic flood' risks loom

Governor Greg Abbott of Texas just gave an update on the impact of Harvey, formerly a category 4 hurricane, and now a tropical storm that made landfall near Corpus Christi late Friday night. There are no confirmed storm fatalities yet. At this time, 338,000 power outages are reported across the state. The governor is issuing a mandatory evacuation order for central parts of Texas.

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Hurricane Harvey could be strongest storm to hit U.S. in over a decade, and a first for Trump's FEMA

#HurricaneHarvey could hit landfall late Friday night along the Texas coast as a Category 3 hurricane.

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See this incredible full circle rainbow

Someone on a crane captured this stunning video of a full circle rainbow. Unfortunately most of us never get a chance to see circle rainbows because the ground interrupts. Here's an explanation from Phil "Bad Astronomy" Plait in Slate:

...To see a rainbow, you face away from the Sun (180°), then look about 42° away from that point (180°–138°). The drops in an arc along that angle will then bend the light back toward you, and you get a rainbow, with the colors spread out a bit because they bend by different amounts.

Oh, wait. Did I say “arc”? Because technically, any raindrop 42° away from the anti-solar point (ooh, fancy science-speak again) will bend the light back to you. We see rainbows in the sky because in general the ground is close to you. When we look up toward the sky we see for a long way, and there are lots of raindrops along your eyeline that can add their light together to make the rainbow. When you look down, the ground gets in the way, there aren’t as many drops, and you don’t see a rainbow.

(via DIGG)

(image above via WoahDude) Read the rest

A cloud shaped like Britain

This image, taken by Matt Hallas in the East Midlands, was sent into the BBC's splendid Weather Watchers page, which has many more atmospheric delights. Read the rest

Man struck by lightning while sitting at his office desk

On Monday, Nick Gemayel was seated at his office desk in his Rochester, New York auto repair shop when he saw a bright flash spark from a light switch and heard a loud crack. Then he realized that his hand hurt like hell was blistered. A co-worker reported that he had seen lightning strike the building. It apparently arced from the light switch into Gemayel. Hospital doctors treated and released him. No word yet on what superpowers he may now have.

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These 'temperature blankets' show a whole year's worth of weather!

All you knitters or crocheters, this one's for you: temperature blankets

The basic idea is that, every single day for an entire year, you'll stitch up a new row (or square or circle or other shape). The color you choose is determined by the outside temperature. 

When I first came across one on Instagram, I thought it was something pregnant women did to kill time while waiting for baby to arrive. I thought these soon-to-be-moms were measuring their internal body temperature not the one outside. I can see now that I made it too complicated, and weird. To be fair, the crocheter of the one I saw had described it as her "daughter's temperature blanket."

Anyway, it's a super cool and simple idea. And it leaves plenty of room for creativity.

Most people start them at the beginning of the year, but you seem like a rebel to me. Start one today. Read the rest

Dozens of prairie storms unfold in this stunning 4K timelapse

Chad Cowan shared this taste of his upcoming long-form timelapse of massive thunderstorms sweeping across the American plains.

He gives a little background on how he was inspired by Tom Lowe:

This collection of timelapses was gathered over the last six years. The project started out as wanting to be able to see the life-cycles of these storms, just for my own enjoyment and to increase my understanding of them. Over time, it morphed into an obsession with wanting to document as many photogenic supercells as I could, in as high a resolution as possible, as to be able to share with those who couldn't see first hand the majestic beauty that comes alive in the skies above America's Great Plains every Spring. After more than 100,000 miles on the road and tens of thousands of shutter clicks later, this is the result. I hope you enjoy watching it as much as I enjoyed creating it. Keep an eye out for a long form version of my storm timelapses, as these are a small sample of what I've been able to gather. I'm not sure yet how the extended version will be released.

FRACTAL - 4k StormLapse (Vimeo / Chad Cowan) Read the rest

Alessandro Puccinelli's 'Intersections,' where violent seas and skies collide

Photographer Alessandro Puccinelli is mesmerized by powerful waves. His photo series Intersections captures the fleeting moment when the ocean and the clouds appear to become one. Read the rest

This pilot takes astonishing aerial nighttime storm photographs

Ecuadorean pilot Santiago Borja Lopez makes the most of his downtime at work, taking stunning photos of dramatic storms, often lit by the moon. Read the rest

Spectacular timelapse of clouds filling the entire Grand Canyon

The latest stunning video from artistic collaborators in the dark sky movement is Kaibab Elegy by Harun Mehmedinovic, shot at the Grand Canyon. At about a minute in, there's a rare and hypnotic full cloud inversion worth the wait. Read the rest

Melting dumpster lid looks like a Dali painting

It is always summer in Phoenix. [via] Read the rest

Animation of today's storms flaring on US radar loop

http://media.boingboing.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/04TlXflrFWK_42Zg.mp4 A time-lapse radar loop from Regional and Mesoscale Meteorology Branch shows today's storms billowing like a fire dancing over gasoline. The image (and the storms) cover the U.S. from West Texas to Pennsylvania. [via] Read the rest

Enormous iceberg off coast is Newfoundland village's latest and somewhat temporary tourist attraction

Tourists are flocking to Ferryland, Newfoundland, reports Aric Jenkins, and it's all because of a huge chunk of ice.

Ferryland, a tiny Newfoundland town of roughly 500 people, got a holiday surprise over Easter weekend when a massive block of ice appeared off-shore — overshadowing people, boats and even houses on land. The iceberg seems to have parked in the waters outside the town and, according to CTV News, visitors have started flocking to the area to witness the colossal floating chunk of ice and post photos on social media.

Ferryland is apparently a good spot for iceberg spotting, but the unusual number and size of the bergs this year are due to "unusually strong counter-clockwise winds." Photo: Reuters. Read the rest

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