Watch police try to catch runaway pig

A resident of Erie County, Ohio called police on Tuesday when she spotted a large pig outside her back door. The police attempted to capture the suspect but as body cam footage (below) shows, it was no easy task. Eventually, the sheriffs used apples to lure the pig into a barn and located the animal's owner.

"We try and avoid pigs," said Erie County Sheriff Paul Sigsworth.

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Some idiot painted graffiti on a Russian polar bear and now the animal likely won't survive

In Russia, some idiot spraypainted this polar bear with "T-34," the model of a Soviet tank. The video was shared by World Wildlife Fund employee Sergey Kavry who lives in the remote region of Chutkotka. From CNN:

In the comments (on Facebook where Kavry posted the video, he) said he obtained the video via WhatsApp from indigenous minorities in Chukotka, in Russia's far east, though it is not clear from the video where it was filmed...

Anatoly Kochnev, a senior researcher at the Russian Academy of Sciences, told Russian state news agency RIA Novosti that, while the black paint is likely to wash off, the polar bear might find it difficult in the meantime to use its coat as camouflage while hunting.

It's not known why the animal was painted. Kochnev said it was probably the work of "pranksters."

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Dogs painted like tigers to scare off monkeys

Farmers in the Malnad region in South India are reportedly dying their dogs' fur with tiger stripes to scare off bands of marauding monkeys. Apparently the monkeys are wreaking havoc on their corn crops.

According to the Deccan Herald, "Srikanta Gowda, a resident of Naluru village, Thirthahalli taluk, said he had seen a tiger-like doll used as a scarecrow near Bhatkal in Uttara Kannada district four years ago. He brought it to the village and placed it in his areca plantation. Surprisingly, monkeys were frightened after seeing the doll and did not return to his plantation."

Based on that success, Gowda had the idea to enlist his dog as a kind of roving tiger-scarecrow. Read the rest

The Irish language has the best weird translations of common animal names

There's a popular saying in the Gaeilgeoir, or Irish Speaker, community: "Is fearr linn Gaeilge briste, ná Béarla cliste," which basically means "Broken Irish is better than clever English."

I'm American, but I heard this refrain many times when I had the privilege of curating an Irish language Twitter account one week. I was nervous, as I've been learning the language as a casual hobby over the last few years. But the native speakers were remarkably encouraging—they were just happy to use the language at all, and to share its musicality with others. (I think the language is having a bit of a renaissance right now, as people in their 20s-40s feel a longing for a cultural connection that their Boomer parents neglected in their eagerness to assimilate).

This is all to say that: I can assure you that these Irish translations of common animal names are absolutely real. And while they're not broken Irish, they're still far more clever than anything our bastard mutt English tongue could ever come up with:

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Posted @withrepost • Thank you @gaeilge_vibes Is aoibhinn liom Gaeilge 💚🤣 #gaeilge #irish #vocabulary #languages #lol #irishblog #tgif #ireland #éire

A post shared by Emha na Réaltaí (@emasolasnarealtaiimochroi) on Nov 11, 2019 at 7:29am PST

This isn't like in English, where we giggle about "titmice" and "cocks" because of the unintended double entendre. "Cíoch" is actually breast. "Bod" is in fact a penis. These are pretty literal translations; no hidden suggestive meanings about it. Read the rest

Cat found in New Mexico 5 years after being lost in Oregon

“I’m excited to hold him. I get to rub the belly – the fuzzy belly. When I last saw him, he was maybe the size of a large burrito and now I’m assuming he’s the size of four large burritos.” — Sasha's human, Viktor Usov. Read the rest

This bear's bōjutsu science is tight

I mean, holy shit. Read the rest

Watch this kind fellow help an overburdened beaver

Last month in Deggendorf, Germany, Alexander Oswald, 19, and his friends encountered a beaver on the road in the middle of the night. Afraid that a a driver might hit the animal, they stopped their car but the beaver had already disappeared. Moments later, it emerged again carrying a huge branch but was visibly struggling to drag it across the road. So Oswald lent a hand. What a nice boy.

(PNP.de) Read the rest

Pet bunny experiences rabbit nirvana

If any of y'all want to do this for me with Japanese stationary supplies and airline tickets, I'm fine with it. Read the rest

Rats' nests are rich with unrecorded history and urgent scientific data

Pack rats, aka woodrats, build their nests, called middens, from plant debris, rocks, animal parts, paper, and almost any other bits of detritus nearby. Frequently, they urinate on their middens. The urine crystalizes and encases the nest material, preserving it for as long as 50,000 years by some estimates. For paleobotanists, middens are a great source of information about how flora has changed over time. Zoologists study the animal remains and poop. And climatologists analyze the material for insight into past climates, even the most recent ice age that ended more than 11,000 years ago. In Smithsonian, Sadie Witkowski digs into the topic, including a story about what historians learned excavating rats' nests in the walls of the 1808 Charleston, South Carolina home of slave trader Nathaniel Russel:

Among the mass of organic matter, they found sewing pins, buttons, marbles, part of a uniform waistcoat, and even fragments of printed paper that could be dated to November 1833. The paper was darkened and curled but still legible once it was gently opened.

“It was protected from rain and moisture, and even though it’s sooty, it didn’t burn,” (University of Delaware art conservator Susan) Buck says. “So we just have all these fragile materials that normally wouldn’t survive.” Among the material, the team recovered scraps of an early writing primer, suggesting some of the enslaved workers living in the kitchen house has been learning to read and write.

To move beyond the written record, historians and conservators have looked for new clues in unlikely places.

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Narwhal the 'Unicorn Puppy' has 'tail' on head he can't wag

10-week-old puppy Narwhal has tail-like appendage growing from forehead

This adorable puppy has a tail growing from his head

This good boy is named Narwhal. And yes, he has a tail growing from his head. Kind folks rescued from the cold outdoors in Kansas City, Mo. and took the 10-week-old pup to Mac's Mission, a nonprofit animal shelter in Jackson, Mo. From Yahoo!:

Once situated in Jackson, Narwhal was evaluated by Dr. Brian Heuring, a veterinarian at Cape Small Animal Clinic, who was able to share a good prognosis on the pup's signature appendage — and no, it doesn't wag, if you were wondering.

"Dr. Heuring is completely not on board with cutting it off at this point," (shelter founder Rochelle) Steffen shared of the extra tail, which is said to be about a third of the size of the tail on Narwhal's posterior. "We took X-rays and there is no medical reason for it to be removed, other than just cosmetic."

"We are always willing to do the medically necessary thing to make sure our animals have a good quality of life, but at this point, it doesn't bother him, it's not in his way," she continued. "He doesn't know any different, so he just runs and plays and is wild, like a normal puppy with a tail on his face."

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Cute "mouse-deer," long lost to science, has been photographed again

This is a silver-backed chevrotain, aka "mouse-deer," from Vietnam. Read the rest

Artisinal gin flavored with elephant dung gets you shit-faced

Indlovu Gin is a new spirit infused with elephant dung. Gives new meaning to the term "shit-faced." It sells for about $32 per bottle. Creators Les and Paula Ansley of Mossel Bay, South Africa, came up with the concept on safari after learning that elephants have a varied diet of plants, fruits, and vegetables but less than half of it is actually digested.

“As a consequence, in the elephant dung, you get the most amazing variety of these botanicals,” Les Ansley told the Associated Press. “(I recall my wife saying) Why don’t we let the elephants do the hard work of collecting all these botanicals and we will make gin from it?"

From the AP:

After about five sizeable bags of dung are collected for a batch of 3,000 to 4,000 bottles of the gin, the droppings are dried and crumbled, then washed to remove dirt and sand. Eventually only the remains of the fruits, flowers, leaves and bark eaten by the elephants are left behind.

Those botanicals are then sterilized and dried again and placed in an airing cupboard. Think of it like a “spice cupboard,” Ansley said. Eventually, the remains are infused in the gin.

(via Fark) Read the rest

Large dog is large

Okay. This dog is ONE year old. One. Read the rest

Fishermen rescue deer floating at sea 5 miles off Maine coast

A lobster catcher in Maine rescued a deer that somehow got swept out 5 miles off the shore, in the ocean. Read the rest

Animal BFFs: Cheetah cub snuggles with puppy friend

You need this. Read the rest

Rapper Lil Pump bitten by live snake while shooting music video

No touchie snek.

Snek no like Lil Pump. Read the rest

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