Beginner Watchmaking by Tim Swike


I thought it would be impossible for an eBook to inspire me to get me working on a watch. Read the rest

Big Bear little chair – each tall and skinny page in this kids' books is as stunning as the next


The concept of Big Bear little chair is a common one: teaching kids to differentiate between large and small. We start off with “Big Bear, little chair,” move on to “Big Plant, little cocoon,” and carry on with this theme until the end, with “Big Snowstorm, little village, tiny bird,” and, “Big Bear, little bear.” What makes this simple book so compelling is the striking art by author and illustrator Lizi Boyd. The bold illustrations are dramatic yet whimsical, with a formal color scheme of black and white (and gray) that is playfully broken up with gumball red. Each tall and skinny page is as stunning as the next. Big Bear little chair makes me happy every time I open it up, and if my kids were still in their pre-school years this would definitely be a frequent read.

Big Bear little chair by Lizi Boyd Chronicle 2015, 32 pages, 6.3 x 12.3 x 0.3 inches $10 Buy one on Amazon Read the rest

Think we don't need Banned Books Week anymore? Think again.


Peter from the National Coalition Against Censorship writes, "Some say book banning isn't even a problem anymore, so we should ditch Banned Books Week altogether. That's a terrible idea." Read the rest

Brass cuffs decorated with vintage maps, anatomy, science and math


Kate in Dorchester, England makes gorgeous brass wrist-cuffs decorated with vintage literary, cartographic and scientific imagery: there's Poe's Raven; the periodic table; anatomical dentistry drawings; Newton's laws of motion; the human spine; a map of the Thames and the Tower of London; a tape-measure; the human foot's bones; and headlines from Jack the Ripper's killings and much, much more. Read the rest

This may be the most brilliantly complicated book synopsis ever on Amazon


You know, every once in a while you run into a real gem on Amazon. A self-published work by an “outsider” author who must also function as their own publisher. When you find a gem like that, you drop to your damn knees and thank Jeff Bezos for creating a space where this sort of thing can happen.

It happens in this synopsis of a book published by P. Arden Corbin of Topeka, Kansas.

Here is his own synopsis of his self-published novel, “Unanswered Letters,”

A very young boy writes letters to his parents, who never answer them. Then when this person grows into an adult, he writes letters to his first wife, his second wife, and lastly to his fourth wife, of which she never answers any of those letters. Because this wife never talks to that husband, like a wife is supposed to do. But while all of this is happening, this male person is also taking care of his various positions in his life, trying to earn a living with all of the many things that he does. And while he is doing this, he is also raising a family of six girls and four boys. Not all of them are naturally born to his family. Meaning some of them he has adopted as a single father, even when he was a married man. Trying to keep his sanity while doing all of these things has put a lot of stress and strain on this person.

Read the rest

Oh Joy Sex Toy, the book, volume 2 [NSFW] [YAY!]


My favorite sex toy review/sex ed/reproductive health webcomic has just released its second collection, with 328 pages' worth of comics by Erica Moen and her guest-comics-creators. Read the rest

Secret Coders: kids' comic awesomely teaches the fundamentals of computer science

Gene Luen Yang and Mike Holmes's Secret Coders is volume one in a new series of ingenious graphic novels for young kids that teach the fundamentals of computer science.

Zeroes: it sucks to be a teen, even with powers

Scott Westerfeld's YA canon is huge and varied, from the Uglies books to the excellent vampire parasitology book Peeps to the dieselpunk Clankers trilogy, and the new one, Zeroes, breaks new ground still: it's a collaboration with Margo Lanagan and Deborah Biancotti about teens with powers.

Phone Call from Paul: new literary podcast from Paul Holdengraber, with Neil Gaiman


Paul Holdengraber, host of the New York Public Library's legendary literary interview series, has started a new podcast called "A phone call from Paul," which he has inaugurated with a two-part interview with Neil Gaiman. Read the rest

Hilo: The Boy Who Crashed to Earth, a fantastic middle-grade adventure comic

Daniel Jackson Lim is the youngest kid in a huge family of overachievers, and he hardly surfaces in his family's consciousness -- which is a good thing, because he's just found a kid in silver underwear who can't remember anything before the moment he hurtled through a hole in space and hit the ground so hard he made a crater, but didn't hurt himself.

Gallery: Outside the Lines Too, more adult coloring brilliance


Souris "Hustler of Culture" Hong has followed up on her amazing 2013 coloring book Outside the Lines with a second edition: Outside the Lines Too. Read the rest

Study: tracking every RPG book in every public & academic library in the world


Edd writes, "I am a professor at Ithaca College in New York. Recently for a research study I tracked almost every Role Playing Game Book circulating in every public and academic library in the world." Read the rest

Comics historian Craig Yoe celebrates Banned Books Week with the Forbidden Comics bundle


Banned Books Week is just around the corner and to help prepare readers for this event, the folks at Humble Bundle have put together a collection of challenged and banned comics.

A portion of the proceeds goes towards benefitting The Comic Book Legal Defense Fund, who helped curate this limited time bundle. Many notable creators are represented here including Alan Moore, Scott Snyder, Jeff Smith, Jeff Lemire, Garth Ennis, the Hernandez brothers, and even Cory Doctorow himself.

The Humble Comics Bundle: Forbidden Comics Supporting Banned Books Week runs for two weeks and ends Wednesday, October 7, 2015 at 11 a.m. Pacific time.

For such a unique bundle about controversial comics, it only felt fitting to call upon an individual just as unique to provide the very first Humble Bundle intro; enter comics historian Craig Yoe, no stranger to the most salacious corners of comicdom.

Take it away, Craig!


Mother was horrified.

She discovered my gaily-painted childhood wooden toy box now had a big steel padlock on it that I had got from Miller's Hardware Store. And it had a hand scrawled sign defiantly affixed: KEEP OUT! THIS MEANS YOU!

Mom became hysterical when I refused her demands to open the box to reveal its hidden contents. She could only imagine what dark secrets it contained.

It WAS filled with terribly embarrassing stuff that I didn’t want anyone to see because it would reveal emblematic objects of my conflicted, tormented adolescence: “men’s magazines” and “children’s comic books.” Both types of opposing fare were dishonorable possessions for a 13 year-old. Read the rest

Name your price for 11 (!) Philip K Dick award-winning novels

PKD.2015.All Covers Large-2

The PKD Award is given for the best paperback original this year, and has been awarded to such classics as Neuromancer. Storybundle's DRM-free collection of name-your-price ebooks includes some of my favorite books of all time: Walter Jon Williams's Knight Moves, Kathe Koja's The Cipher, Lewis Shiner's Frontera, Lisa Mason's Summer of Love, Elizabeth Hand's Aestival Time, and more. Read the rest

Randall "XKCD" Munroe's Thing Explainer book-tour


The XKCD Thing Explainer book -- which explains technical subjects using the thousand most common English words, in the style of Up Goer Five -- is due out in November, and Randall Munroe is going out on tour ("book trip") in November! Read the rest

Kickstarting an anthology of Hugo nominees


David Steffen is raising $1250 to defray costs on a collection of 2014 Hugo Award-nominated short stories; one of his stretch goals is an audio edition produced by the excellent Skyboat Media studios (where Wil Wheaton recorded the audiobook editions of Homeland and Information Doesn't Want to Be Free). Read the rest

Ian McDonald's "Luna: New Moon" - the moon is a much, much harsher mistress

We've projected our political and spiritual longings on the Moon since antiquity, and it's been a talismanic home to science fiction's most ambitious dreams for generations. But no one writes like Ian McDonald, and no one's Moon is nearly so beautiful and terrible as Luna: New Moon.

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