Hungary cancels proposed Internet tax in the face of mass opposition


After 100,000 Hungarians took to the street in opposition to a per-megabyte tax on their Internet usage, the autocratic Prime Minister Viktor Orban (whose election was characterized by outside observers as "free but not fair") was forced into a rare climbdown.

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USPS usage declines, but sloppy postal surveillance is way, way up

Surveillance requests for "postal metadata" climbed 600% in recent years, often undertaken with badly formed or expired warrants.

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100K Hungarians march against Internet tax


When Hungary's government announced a per-megabyte tax on Internet traffic, people were pissed; a week later, 100,000 people took to the streets to let Prime Minister Viktor Orbán know how they felt about the proposal.

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Potato-chip surveillance: once you start, you just can't stop

The ongoing revelations about UK domestic spying on political activists, continued in some case for decades, and which included an incident in which an undercover police officer fathered a child with the woman he was spying on, illustrate an important point: once you decide someone is suspicious enough to follow around, there's no evidence that you can gather to dispel that suspicion.

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Verizon's new big budget tech-news site prohibits reporting on NSA spying or net neutrality


They're positioning the new site "Sugar String" as a well-funded competitor to Wired, but reporters are not allowed to mention NSA spying (in which Verizon was an enthusiastic partner) or net neutrality (which Verizon has devoted itself to killing, with campaigns of overt lobbying and covert dirty tricks).

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Thousands of Americans got sub-broadband ISP service, thanks to telcoms shenanigans


Measurement Lab, an open, independent analysis organization devoted to measuring the quality of Internet connections and detecting censorship, technical faults and network neutrality violations, has released a major new report on how ISPs connect to one another, and it's not pretty.

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CHP officer who stole and shared nude photos of traffic-stop victim claims "it's a game"

Officer Sean Harrington of Martinez California Highway Patrol says that when he stole nude photos from the cell phone of a woman he'd traffic-stopped and then shared them with other CHP officers, that he was just playing "a game" that is widespead in the force.

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UK Tories propose life sentences for using a computer to "damage the economy"

Under a proposed "computer crime bill," if you use a computer in the commission of an offense that damages "national security, human welfare, the economy or the environment" you could face a life sentence.

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Hungary's Internet tax arouses mass opposition

The economically precarious country has a remarkably low rate of corporate tax, and makes up the difference with high, regressive consumption taxes, including the one of the highest rates of VAT in Europe.

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Challenger for Michele Bachmann's seat offers "money back guarantee" if he ever lobbies or takes special-interest money

John Denny's standing as an independent in the Minnesota Sixth District, running against Michele Bachmann's successor, and has offered a "legally binding" contract to forfeit his salary and a sum equal to twice any contribution should he ever lobby or take campaign money that puts him in a conflict of interest.

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Inside Secure threatens security researcher who demonstrated product flaws

Martin Holst Swende maintains a free/open tool for testing software that uses the (notoriously flawed) Iclass Software, which is used by Inside Secure for its RFID-based access systems.

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American businesses devour themselves to enrich the 1%


A Goldman Sachs report on stock buybacks shows a suspicious clustering in the fourth quarter, just when management bonuses are being calculated.

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Database of military surplus equipment sold to US police forces


Kyle writes, "The US Department of Defense has a specific program to provide: "surplus DoD military equipment to state and local civilian law enforcement agencies for use in counter-narcotics and counter-terrorism operations, and to enhance officer safety" (Excess Property Program, or 1033 Program). This equipment can account for things like planes and helicopters, grenade launchers and assault rifles.

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Anti-corporatist protesters seize town hall, citing Magna Carta

Joly sez, "On October 10 2014 UK activists, concerned about EU-US TTIP and EU-Canada CETA agreements that could make it possible for corporations to sue governments for banning fracking, invoked Article 61 of the Magna Carta to temporarily seize control of Glastonbury Town Hall. They claim that the 1215 Magna Carta's Article 61 - the Lawful Rebellion clause, which some say was later was later revoked in 1297, was validated by 25 Barons in 2001. A full video, including negotiations with the police, is posted on Youtube."

CTO of NSA is moonlighting for Keith Alexander's blue-chip rent-a-cybercops

Former NSA boss Alexander charges $1M/month for cybersecurity advice, but promises that he's not selling any of the state secrets from his career as a long-serving, all-seeing top spook. But he hired his protege Patrick Dowd -- who still draws a paycheck from Uncle Sugar -- to moonlight for his company, which has the self-parodying name "Ironnet Cybersecurity."

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