Bono named in Glamour magazine's Women of the Year list

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U2 singer Bono is named among Glamour magazine's women of the year in recognition of his campaigning for womens' rights. The general reception runs the gamut from appalled dismay to despairing laughter.

Bono said he was grateful, and that men "have to be involved in the solutions," etc. Read the rest

Check out Radioshack's 1981 computer catalog

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The 1981 Radioshack computer catalog is beautifully illustrated, but everything in it is complete TRS. Read the rest

The forgotten world of TV guide magazines, curated

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DON'T PARADE IN MY RAIN (via Metafilter) is a blog collecting scans of the magazines that were once our only guide to what's on the box. Replaced by the digital menus provided by cable boxes, they often featured striking illustrations by artists such as Gary Viskupic. Read the rest

Scanned issues of 1960s Avant Garde magazine

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Avant Garde magazine ran for 16 issues from January 1968 to July 1971. It had a small print run, but is treasured today for its gorgeous design by art director Herb Lubalin. It was edited by photo-journalist Ralph Ginzburg, who was indicted by U.S. Attorney General Robert Kennedy in the 1960s for distributing obscene literature through the mails. This website has scans of most of the issues. I would love to have the dead tree version of the complete run.

Avant Garde is a seminal, but somewhat overlooked by a wider public, magazine, which broke taboos, rattled some nerves and made a few enemies. The magazine was the brainchild of Ralph Ginzburg, an eager and zealous publisher, even if the path that led to Avant Garde wasn’t so straightforward. It represents the third major collaboration between Ralph Ginzburg and Herb Lubalin, the magazine’s talented art director. The two previous magazines came to unexpected demise due to their candor and provocativeness, that landed them into legal trouble.

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Meet Jake Phelps, the thrashed editor of skateboarding bible Thrasher

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Since 1993, Jake Phelps has been the top editor at legendary skateboarding magazine Thrasher. At 53, he's still a skate punk through and through. From Willy Staley's fantastic profile of Phelps in California Sunday, with photos by Andrew Paynter:

An unwillingness, or inability, to stop is perhaps the defining characteristic of Phelps’s career. He’s been the editor of Thrasher since 1993. The magazine occupies such a privileged space in skateboarding’s collective imagination that it’s difficult to know what to compare it to. Skaters call it “the bible,” but we’re prone to hyperbole. Maybe it’s Vogue, but for degenerates, and Phelps is skateboarding’s Anna Wintour. Phelps likes to think of himself as the Thrasher brand personified, and in many ways, from his caustic wit to his encyclopedic knowledge of the sport, that’s true.

Phelps is an unreconstructed punk rocker in a city that has little need or space for them anymore. He refuses to pay his Muni fare, instead slipping through the rear doors. He bums cigarettes everywhere he goes; he calls kids blood. He barks at strangers and screams at drivers. He sails through lights with an unearned confidence, directing traffic with cryptic hand gestures. He shoplifts candy bars just to see if people are paying attention. (Once, in Copenhagen, they were.) His entire affect is charmingly cartoonish. His ears protrude from low on his head, and his smile cracks his face in half. If you dipped him in yellow paint, he might not seem out of place in Springfield.

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Scans of complete run of OZ, psychedelic underground newspaper from UK (1967-1973)

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The University of Wollongong has kindly scanned every gorgeous issue of OZ, a psychedelic magazine from the UK, which ran from 1967 to 1973.

OZ was founded by Martin Ritchie Sharp (1942 – 2013).

[Sharp] was an Australian artist, underground cartoonist, songwriter and film-maker.

Sharp made contributions to Australian and international culture from the early 1960s, and was called Australia's foremost pop artist. His psychedelic posters of Bob Dylan, Donovan and others, rank as classics of the genre, and his covers, cartoons and illustrations were a central feature of OZ magazine, both in Australia and in London. Martin co-wrote one of Cream's best known songs, "Tales of Brave Ulysses," created the cover art for Cream's Disraeli Gears and Wheels of Fire albums, and in the 1970s became a champion of singer Tiny Tim, and of Sydney's embattled Luna Park. [Wikipedia]

OZ magazine was published in London between 1967 and 1973 under the general editorship of Richard Neville and later also Jim Anderson and Felix Dennis. Martin Sharp was initially responsible for art and graphic design. Copies of OZ can be viewed and downloaded for research purposes from this site. OZ magazine is reproduced by permission of Richard Neville.

Please be advised: This collection has been made available due to its historical and research importance. It contains explicit language and images that reflect attitudes of the era in which the material was originally published, and that some viewers may find confronting. [University of Wollongong]

[via] Read the rest

Penthouse magazine no longer to be printed

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Penthouse, the long-running men's magazine founded by Bob Guccione in 1969, is to cease publication in print. The Wall Street Journal reports that it would be "reimagined" as an online-only affair.
“Reimagined for the preferred consumption of content today by consumers, the digital version of Penthouse Magazine will combine and convert everything readers know and love about the print magazine experience to the power of a digital experience,” publisher FriendFinder Network said in a statement.

It once sold 5m copies a month, went under in 2004, and was bought by online hookups 'n' porn network FriendFinder—which itself went under in 2013. Its circulation figures aren't known, but was shifting about 200k last time figures were released in the 2000s. Read the rest

Blue's is a magazine about Japanese construction worker culture

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“There’s no media anywhere about these guys, but they’re so cool!” That's the thought Tomonobu Yanagi had when he decided to make a magazine about "construction culture." Yanagi was a punk musician in the 1970s, and now manages a waterworks construction firm. He teamed up with Japanese “new journalism” writer Gensho Ishimaru (known for writing about his recreational drug trips) to launch Blue's Magazine. With lavish photos, it covers subjects such as the kind of food construction workers favor (salty, greasy food), what it is like to be on a crew rebuilding the Fukushima area, and the influx of construction workers from Africa and America.

From Ignition:

Before BLUE’S, no “culture magazine” had ever written profiles of the men who work at construction sites. Because of that, though, there are really no fixed rules or formulas for how to make such a magazine. Every issue’s layout, Ishimaru says, presents a fresh challenge, and forces the pair to reinvent the rules from zero. The best example of this may be the magazine’s cover design, which features photos of construction artist Hironari Kubota in a loincloth

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Why wouldn't Reader's Digest remove malware from its website?

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For nigh on a week, the internet hollered at Reader's Digest to remove malware from its website, to no apparent response.

The attack consists of a malicious script injected within compromised WordPress sites that launches another URL whose final purpose is to load the Angler exploit kit. Site owners that have been affected should keep in mind that those injected scripts/URLs will vary over time, although they are all using the same pattern (see IOCs below for some examples).

The website of popular magazine Reader’s Digest is one of the victims of this campaign and people who have visited the portal recently should make sure they have not been infected. The payload we observed at the time of capture was Bedep which loaded Necurs a backdoor Trojan, but that of course can change from day to day.

Dan Goodin got exasperated: Hey Reader’s Digest: Your site has been attacking visitors for days.

Reader's Digest has been infected since last week with code originating with Angler, an off-the-shelf hack-by-numbers exploit kit that saves professional criminals the hassle of developing their own attack scripts, researchers from antivirus provider Malwarebytes told Ars. People who visit the site with outdated versions of Adobe Flash, Internet Explorer, and other browsing software are silently infected with malware that gains control over their computers. Malwarebytes researchers said they sent Reader's Digest operators e-mails and social media alerts last week warning the site was infected but never got a response. The researchers estimate that thousands of other sites have been similarly attacked in recent weeks and that the number continues to grow.
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Kickstarting a new science fiction magazine from the propietors of Singularity & Co

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The people behind Brooklyn's brilliant science fiction bookstore Singularity & Co are looking to raise $60,000 to launch a new science fiction quarterly magazine called the Tycho Journal. Read the rest

Kill Screen, game culture periodical, relaunches

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Kill Screen is one of my favorite game magazines, unafraid of going deep into the murky waters around the mainstream of gaming culture. They're launching a revamp on Kickstarter, with a plan to focus on "kinfolk for videogames" instead of technology and media, which sounds just perfect to me.

“Now is the moment to capture the independent game scene as it’s blossoming,” says [Jamin] Warren. “Just like the budding of New Hollywood in 70s or hip-hop in the 80s or electronic music in the 90s, independent games are reaching unprecedented heights of creativity and diversity.

”Kill Screen’s magazine will be totally overhauled in both content and design. Design references include beautiful magazines like Offscreen, The FADER & Juxtapoz. Rewards include exclusive art created for Kill Screen by some of their favorite artists,attendance to the annual Two5six festival, physical copies and subscriptions of the new magazine, and a limited-edition Kill Screen lapel pin.

“Print is a gorgeous and meaningful way to capture the beauty of independent play,” Warren says.

$5 gets a PDF of the next issue; $25 gets a physical edition and a bunch of goodies. Read the rest

Magazine covers, then and now

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Over at Medium, Karen X. Cheng and Jerry Gabra look at the evolution of magazine covers. To paraphrase Mister Jalopy, I don't like the old ones because they're old, I like them because they're better. Read the rest

Does anyone still make those magazines where David Bowie is mauled by weasels?

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National Geographic's first wildlife photos

The July 1906 issue of National Geographic featured the magazine's first wildlife photos, night shots by George Shiras III. Two of the National Geographic Society board members were infuriated, arguing that the magazine was becoming a "picture book." Read the rest

WET – the 1970s magazine that pioneered new wave design

In 1976, WET magazine was launched in Venice, California by a young architecture school grad named Leonard Koren. During its 34-issue, five-year run, WET invented and refined a California new wave design aesthetic that spun modern graphic design in a new direction.

In his retrospective book Making WET: The Magazine of Gourmet Bathing, Koren writes that he had “no skills in writing, editing, designing, art direction, advertising sales, publishing, or business generally” when he launched the magazine, “but didn’t consider this an impediment.” (This sounds like Carla and I when we started bOING bOING as a zine in 1988.)

Koren he was right. WET was innovative, playful, surprising, rule-breaking, and only occasionally about gourmet bathing. In this anecdote-filled retrospective, Koren describes the gestation, evolution, and demise of his little-known, yet powerfully influential magazine.

Making WET: The Magazine of Gourmet Bathing, by Leonard Koren

Take a look at other beautiful paper books at Wink. And sign up for the Wink newsletter to get all the reviews and photos delivered once a week.

article {max-width:1000px} Read the rest

Cover from 1922 zine called The Flapper

This is the greatest magazine cover ever.

(The cover model, Marie Prevost was an it girl in the 1920s, but she had a difficult life and died of acute alcoholism at the age of 38 in January 1937.)

(Via If Charlie Parker Was a Gunslinger, There'd Be a Whole Lot of Dead Copycats) Read the rest

True Crime Detective Magazines 1924-1969 (Gallery)

Eric Godtland and Dian Hanson have lovingly compiled a picture book about crime magazines from the mid-20th century called True Crime Detective Magazines 1924-1969. It's loaded with exceedingly lurid, attention-grabbing magazine covers and illustrations.

At the height of the Jazz Age, when Prohibition was turning ordinary citizens into criminals and ordinary criminals into celebrities, America’s true crime detective magazines were born. True Detective came first in 1924, and by 1934, when the Great Depression had produced colorful outlaws like Machine Gun Kelly, Bonnie and Clyde, Baby Face Nelson, and John Dillinger, the magazines were so popular cops and robbers alike vied to see themselves on the pages. Even FBI boss J. Edgar Hoover wrote regularly for what came to be called the “Dickbooks,” referring to a popular slang term for a detective.

As the decades rolled on, the magazines went through a curious metamorphosis, however. When liquor was once more legal, the Depression over and all the flashy criminals dead or imprisoned, the “detectives” turned to sin to make sales. Sexy bad girls in tight sweaters, slit skirts, and stiletto heels adorned every cover. Cover lines shouted “I Was a Girl Burglar—For Kicks,” “Sex Habits of Women Killers,” “Bride of Sin!,” “She Played Me for a Sucker,” and most succinctly, “Bad Woman.”

True Crime Detective Magazines follows the evolution and devolution of this distinctly American genre from 1924 to 1969. Hundreds of covers and interior images from dozens of magazine titles tell the story, not just of the “detectives,” but also of America’s attitudes towards sex, sin, crime and punishment over five decades.

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