"useless machine"

The 'Terrifying Automatic Hair Cutter'

Move over Flowbee, inventor Joseph Herscher of Joseph's Machines has figured out a fresh new way to cut one's hair at home using a swinging chandelier and a large kitchen knife. He calls it the "Terrifying Automatic Hair Cutter."

Wouldn't it be nice to get a haircut in the comfort of your own home, for free? I've made a machine for that. Don’t try this at home folks, it may not look like it but I am a professional!

Previously: A complex Rube Goldberg machine that serves cake and A useless machine that wraps gifts in 10 seconds Read the rest

A complex Rube Goldberg machine that serves cake

Joseph Herscher of Joseph's Machines has outdone himself with his latest machine. It's an incredibly complex Rube Goldberg machine that took him three months to make called "The Cake Server" and it does just that... serve cake. The "cherry on top" is literally a cherry on top. Watch!

Now watch the behind-the-scenes video:

Previously: A useless machine that wraps gifts in 10 seconds Read the rest

Squirrel eats glazed donut

Donut Squirrel is my new spirit animal. Read the rest

Now you can send bouquets of donuts instead of flowers

When you care enough to send the very best, skip the Hallmark cards and flowers and ship a bouquet of donuts to a loved one.

It's a thing. A bunch of donut bouquet shops have popped up around the globe. Here's what I could find:

-- Los Angeles: Donut Princess LA, prices start at $20 for three donuts

-- London: Donut Bouquets, prices start at £34.99 (~$48.87) for eight donuts, delivered in a "luxurious black box"

-- Australia (various cities): Dessertboxes.com.au, prices start at $78 AUD (~$61.15) for eight donuts, also in a fancy box

-- Las Vegas and Henderson: The Donut Bouquet, prices at $49.95 for a dozen, customizations available

This is not to be confused with the evil clown donut delivery service.

image via Donut Princess LA Read the rest

A useless machine that wraps gifts in 10 seconds

It's not a good machine or a precise machine, but it is still a machine that will wrap gifts (and sandwiches and ankles) in 10 seconds.

But the best part of this video isn't the present wrapping, it's when inventor Joseph Herscher of Joseph's Machines shows his many attempts at automating the Christmas-tree-decorating process. Read the rest

There's an evil clown donut delivery service in Texas

That revamped IT film is bringing clowns, downright terrifying ones, right back into the pop culture spotlight.

One donut shop in Texas is leveraging the trend by offering a scary clown delivery service. On Monday and Tuesday, September 25 and 26, you can have Hurts Donut (great name!) in the Dallas suburb of Frisco do the dirty deed for you. And by "dirty deed," I mean "have an evil clown deliver your friends donuts."

In an interview with Dallas area site GuideLive, Hurts Donut co-owner Kas Clegg denies the service was directly inspired by IT clown Pennywise, "We always try to keep up with the trends, and clowns are trending right now... We just love scary clowns."

Have future enemies in the Frisco area? Call 469-214-8001 to schedule delivery. The clown delivery fee is $5 in addition to the regular delivery fee of $5. So, $10 plus whatever the donuts cost.

The donut shop notes on Facebook, "If we have enough interest in surrounding communities, let us know in the comments below, we may pick a day for out of town clown deliveries as well!"

Thanks, Chris!

Previously: Steven King's "It" hurting the clown business Read the rest

Twisty Vase, meet Useless Machine

What's better than a Useless Machine? One that is built on a clever, threaded "twisty vase" whose lid twirls open and shut! Read the rest

Why are doughnut boxes usually pink?

At the Los Angeles Times, David Pierson unties the story of why doughnut boxes are so frequently pink, particularly in southern California. It's a story of Cambodian refugees who emigrated to the US in the 1970s and built the donut market. But why pink? From the LA Times:

According to (Bakemark, formerly Westco) company lore, a Cambodian doughnut shop owner asked Westco some four decades ago if there were any cheaper boxes available other than the standard white cardboard. So Westco found leftover pink cardboard stock and formed a 9-by-9-by-4-inch container with four semicircle flaps to fold together. To this day, people in the business refer to the box as the “9-9-4.”

“It’s the perfect fit for a dozen doughnuts,” said Jim Parker, BakeMark’s president and chief executive.

More importantly to the thrifty refugees, it cost a few cents less than the standard white. That’s a big deal for shops that go through hundreds, if not thousands, of boxes a week. It didn’t hurt either that pink was a few shades short of red, a lucky color for the refugees, many of whom are ethnic Chinese. White, on the other hand, is the color of mourning.

Len Bell, president of Evergreen Packaging in La Mirada, first noticed the proliferation of pink boxes as a regional manager for Winchell’s in the early 1980s. Back in the Southland after a few years in Minnesota, Bell was amazed to see the doughnut business seemingly transformed overnight by Cambodian refugees, who proved quick studies and skillful businesspeople.

Read the rest

Pixel-art Useless Machine on the web

A classic favorite of Boing Boing editors, the Useless Machine has been implemented as a website for your button-pressing pleasure. Read the rest

The automated, invisible revert-wars of Wikipedia's bot ecosystem

In Even good bots fight, a paper written by Oxford Internet Institute researchers and published in PLOS One, the authors survey the edits and reverts made by Wikipedia's diverse community of bots, uncovering some curious corners where bots -- rate-limited by Wikipedia's rules for bots -- slowly and remorseless follow one another around, reverting each other. Read the rest

Watch this young woman eat 50 Krispy Kreme donuts

"It honestly took every bit of strength in me to get through all 50 donuts as they were incredibly sweet but I'm so glad I did," said competitive eater Nela Zisser.

Read the rest

World's Most Useless Machine, now with more uselessness

I could watch this all day. Read the rest

Useful machine browses internet randomly

The Random User is an art installation posted to Vimeo by monobo. [via JWZ]

"A vintage intervened mouse that browse internet randomly, without control. A special user who does not attend UX strategies, CTAs, quality content ... This small desktop experiment explores the identity on the Internet theories and the "Google Analytics" world."

Previously: Eight-switch useless machine Fancy useless machine Most useless machine

Read the rest

Human vs eight-switch Useless Machine

The Useless Machine Advanced Edition: eight times more useless than the original! Read the rest

Man impersonates cop to get donut discount

Charles Barry, 48, of Pasco County, Florida was arrested yesterday for impersonating a law enforcement officer and improper exhibition of a firearm. He was attempting to get a discount at Dunkin' Donuts. Apparently he had been demanding a police discount for quite some time, including on weekends when visiting the establishment with his family, and the Dunkin Donuts manager stopped offering him the discount "because of his abuse.” Read the rest

Advanced Useless Machine

Earlier this week, Mark posted a fancy Useless Machine that had all sorts of exciting behaviors when you turned it on. But I think I prefer the Useless machine advanced edition, with its many switches and prodding metal fingers, built from organs harvested from a donor printer. Looking back into the archives, I see we've made quite a habit of posting about the amazing Useless Machine phenomenon.

Useless machine advanced edition

(via Beyond the Beyond) Read the rest

Fancy "useless machine"

[Video Link] Here's a useless machine that puts on a great show. Read the rest

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