Basquiat Barbie

Alright, you've got our attention, Mattel.

For their adult collector's market, they've created a Jean-Michel Basquiat X Barbie Doll.

Barbie celebrates esteemed artist Jean-Michel Basquiat, whose prolific body of work played an essential role in elevating street art from the underground to gaining well-deserved acclaim in the upper echelons of the art world. His brilliant paintings are an infusion of graphic poetry, cultural dichotomies and compelling social statements that still inspire today. In a stunning tribute to the artist, this collectible Barbie doll wears a head-to-toe ensemble featuring many well-known elements from works spanning Basquiat's career. From the gleaming golden crown atop her head to the bespoke suit emblazoned with artwork, Jean-Michel Basquiat X Barbie Doll is a curated collaboration bridging two cultural icons.

Love it or hate it, the doll sells for $50 (and has already sold out).

(Hyperallergic)

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"Invisible ink" features found in Basquiat painting

Art conservator Emily Macdonald-Korth was evaluationg a client's Jean-Michel Basquiat untitled painting from 1981 when she looked at the work under ultraviolet light to reveal any repairs or varnishing. From artnet News:

“I start looking at this thing and I see these arrows,” Macdonald-Korth told artnet News. She flipped the lights back on to make sure she wasn’t imagining things and the arrows disappeared. She flipped the lights off again and there they were: two arrows drawn in what looked like black-light crayon, virtually identical to other arrows drawn visibly on the canvas with red and black oil sticks. “I’ve never seen anything like it,” she said. “He basically did a totally secret part of this painting.”

In fact, this isn’t the first time Basquiat has been known to use fluorescent UV materials. In 2012, Sotheby’s London discovered that his painting Orange Sports Figure from 1982—done just months after the one Macdonald-Korth analyzed—contained an invisible-ink signature of the artist’s name in the bottom right corner. But he has never been known to include UV-specific imagery in his work.

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