Mysterious hole appears in the floor of a 175-year-old New England house, attempting to swallow the owner

In what is definitely not the start of a modern HP Lovecraft adaptation, a new resident was moving into a house in Guilford, Connecticut that was built in 1843. A mysterious hole appeared in the floor and, according to local police, the man fell, "into the abyss of a 20-30ft well, splashing into extremely cold water that was well over the victim’s head."

As WTNH News explained, this gaping hole was a well, actually, which was likely outside of the house when it was originally built. An addition to the house was built in 1981, but the opening to the well wasn't very well-covered — there was no subfloor or well cap, just some hardwood floorboards placed across the top of it.

The victim was pulled up on a rope by firefighters after 25 minutes in the freezing well water, and is said to have only sustained minor injuries. Whether he's been possessed by some ancient Lovecraftian evil that buried in that well long ago has yet to be discerned.

Person rescued after falling through floor, into deep well inside historic Guilford home [Alex Ceneviva / WTNH]

Police: Resident plummeted into ‘abyss’ below 177-year-old New England home [Frank O'Laughlin / WHDH]

Image via Guilford Police Department Facebook Read the rest

Two great deep-dives mine the endless hole at the bottom of Mitch McConnell's inhumanity

Mitch McConnell is terrible. I've known this for a long time, though it probably first came to my attention personally after his open commitment to making Obama a "one-term president," which was near a decade before he started gleefully referring to himself as the "Grim Reaper." But while it's been no surprise to watch his Machiavellian enabling of Trump, I've never really understood how any rational human could look at McConnell and see someone worth rallying behind. He revels in the destruction of all social fabric and proudly caters to corporate interests that do objectively demonstrable harm to human life. Even if you take Republican voters at their word about the things they claim to care for, McConnell still disavows it all.

Most private American citizens could probably reach a general consensus on the things that are wrong in Washington, even if they continue to disagree on the solutions — but Mitch McConnell embodies every single one one of those problems, and doesn't even try to hide it. Worse, he prides himself on it. He is a walking nuclear bomb, branded with corporate logos, who says, "Government is evil and will destroy your lives, and if you vote for me, I'll prove it."

I recently read (or more accurately, listened to, via Audm) two longform articles that really dig into the Lovecraftian horror that is Mitch McConnell's overall existence. And while I emerged from these articles with an even more profound disgust for the man, I have at least come to a better understanding of his special brand of nihilism. Read the rest