Arbitrage nomads are stripping the carcasses of America's dying big-box stores and moving the choicest morsels into Amazon warehouses

Across America, semi-homeless "nomads" drive from big-box store to big-box store, hunting for items on clearance that Amazon customers are paying a premium for; when they find them, they snap them up and add them to the bins at Fulfillment by Amazon warehouses, whence they are shipped on to consumers. Read the rest

Material culture, considered (harmful?)

Designer, maker and writer Hillary Predko's "Kipple Field Notes" is five short essays on the nature of stuff in the 21st century, its relationship to justice, the environment, cities, intergenerational strife, housing, and geopolitics. Read the rest

Things Organized Neatly: a book of knollish greatness

The Things Organized Neatly blog (previously), which celebrates the kentucky art of knolling, is now a gorgeous, essential book filled with photos of meticulously arranged wonders of all description. Read the rest

Blooks: functional objects disguised as books

About Blooks is a blog devoted to "blooks," objects that look like books but aren't, such as book-shaped handbags, hollow books used to hide valuables, and booze flasks that are disguised as books. Read the rest

Object Lessons: short, thrilling books and essays about everyday objects

The Object Lessons project, edited by game theory legend Ian Bogost and cultural studies academic Christopher Schaberg, commissions short essays and small, beautiful books about everyday objects from shipping containers to toast. Read the rest

Forget tidying: losing your precious possessions is the real "life-changing magic"

Marie Kondo's Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up became a global bestseller by advising you to get rid of everything that doesn't bring you joy, and advising you to anthropomorphize your belongings and imagine how they feel about being owned by you. Read the rest

Venn diagram of anticonventional objects

As someone who gets off on material culture (but struggles with space constraints, financial reality and environmental concerns), I was struck by Bruce Sterling's Venn diagram depicting "anticonventional objects" -- a phrase that pretty much sums up my wunderkammer urge.

Update: See also Mark's account of Bruce's presentation of this graphic at Maker Faire Rome.

*A prettier version of an earlier sketch of mine. Read the rest