Silence of the Lambs bloopers reel

In honor of the great director Jonathan Demme who died yesterday, please enjoy this bloopers reel from his classic film Silence of the Lambs.

More horror film blooper reels at TVOvermind.

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The Silence of the Lambs, a romantic comedy

"Quid pro quo – I tell you things, you tell me things."

Edited by Jon Tomlinson; Narration: Andy Geller; Executive Producer: Dustin McLean (CineFix)

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Disney is mooting an overnight Star Wars LARP resort

Disney is contemplating opening a luxury Star Wars themed resort next to the Hollywood Studios park at Disney World, which could feature multi-day live-action role-playing games that run overnight, with guests staying all night in the park to interact with costumed characters and automated elements (droids, etc) to game out scenarios. Read the rest

'Star Wars: Rogue One' gets an Honest Trailer

”Enjoy one of the most beautiful Star Wars films to date—that feels like the world’s biggest budget fan film.” Read the rest

The 11 stereotypical roles offered to Black men in Hollywood

In this video for Mic, comedian and actor Mamoudou N’Diaye auditions for the 11 roles black men are so often asked to play in Hollywood. Read the rest

The Death of the Exorcist

With the death of author William Peter Blatty on January 13 at 88, I could not help but be reminded that, exactly 43 years ago on that date, at age 15 I first saw The Exorcist, for which he had written the screenplay based on his earlier book. He also exerted strong control over the production.

It was a time when I was able to see many films due to a decent allowance from a generous father. The previous year, my mother had taken me to see The Godfather at the Loew’s Orpheum theater on 86th street just off Third Ave in Manhattan.

It was a big deal because at age 14, and at that time in 1972, there was a lot in The Godfather most kids my age had never seen (we still had only seven TV channels; no cable, no internet). To top it off, a friend of mine was an usher at what I hazily remember as a Trans-Lux Cinema on Third Avenue just off 57th street, and he offered to sneak me into a showing of Last Tango in Paris. I was a big Brando fan, and I definitely saw a lot in that film I had not seen before. (On the other hand, you’ve probably never seen an usher in a movie theater.)

I’d also watched about 10 zillion horror movies on WPIX’s Chiller Theater during the preceding decade, and was extremely curious about why people were so freaked out about The Exorcist. Instead of going on opening day, my usual habit, I decided to wait until the lines abated. Read the rest

Superhero portraits composited from faces of actors who played them

Posted to r/interestingasfuck by redditor Got2ReturnVideoTapes. Read the rest

'100 People Of Dance' will lift your spirits

As part of his Project One Life series, Matt Bray has uploaded videos of himself performing the same dance routine for 100 days in his bedroom as well as performing the routine in 100 different places.

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Lovely short film “Hot Mess” celebrates female friendships

Hazel Hayes is an Irish YouTuber and filmmaker, and she recently uploaded this sitcom excerpt called “Hot Mess” on her YouTube channel. Read the rest

Making of the creatures in Rogue One: A Star Wars Story

Enjoy this "creature featurette" with director Gareth Edwards and Creature Effects Supervisor Neal Scanlan introducing us to the strange characters in Rogue One: A Star Wars Story.

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The FEEL FLUX grants the sense of slowing down time

I’ve been playing with my FEEL FLUX for weeks and its hit rate in the amazement department is 100%.

Each time you drop the metal ball through the copper tube you’d expect it to zip out the other end but instead, it lazily creeps from one end to the other and dribbles out into your waiting hand.

 

SILENT CATCH

A “Silent Catch” is what happens when you toss the ball into the FF and it slowly glides down the sides without making contact with it.  I have to say that it’s satisfying and magical every time I pull off the maneuver.

As the ball glides down the tube, the magnetic field changes inside the metal wall and when this happens, a bit of voltage is created.   This reaction is not unlike a tiny, temporary battery and is called an electromotive force. The movement pattern of the voltage moves down with the ball and looks like this:

 

 

What could be simpler?

The tube’s material is an electrical conductor and drives current around in circles as the ball descends. The scientists at my laboratory tell me that when this happens, a second magnetic field is created that opposes the downward motion of the magnetic ball. The ball wants to fall through the tube at 9.8 meters per second but the field wants to halt it and of course, gravity wins in the end. And here’s the crazy part – the faster the initial downward motion, the more powerful the slowing force becomes. Read the rest

Flowchart: which Shakespeare play to see

This illustrated flowchart makes it easy to pick an evening out with the Bard. Read the rest

Thunderbolt Fantasy: anime-esque action with puppets

Imagine a mix of modern animation and 1960s marionette show Thunderbirds and you still won't quite capture how awesome Thunderbolt Fantasy is. It's an example of glove puppetry, a form of folk art dating back centuries.

Set in an Eastern fantasy setting, Dān Fěi and her brother, guardians of a sword known as the Tiān Xíng Jiàn, are pursued by the evil Xuán Guǐ Zōng clan, who seek to obtain the sword for their master, Miè Tiān Hái. While her brother is defeated, Fěi, who possesses the sword's crossguard, manages to escape off a cliff.

The full series is on crunchyroll. Read the rest

Scot Nery’s Boobie Trap is out of his mind

LA is chock full of beautiful theaters, but the one to be at on Wednesday nights is the famous Fais Do-Do Ballroom. It’s not because of the rich history that oozes from its architectural pores – it’s because that’s where Scot Nery will be. And when you go to his show, don’t be surprised if he greets you at the door and offers you a piece of cake. After all, you’re stepping into an entertaining party of his design.  

When the show begins, Scot explains the 3 rules that each of his performers must live by:

 

While on stage, anything goes but the act must not be longer than 4 minutesAt the 3 minute mark, a yellow warning light will be triggered as a reminder to wrap things upIf 4 minutes are exceeded, Scot will literally run onto the stage and boot the performer as the house band plays the Boobie Trap theme-song

 

Every show that Scot puts on is completely different from the last and his emceeing style is ridiculously energetic as he introduces the evening’s 14+ acts.

At times Scot may feel that the energy isn't quite up to his standards and he'll take matters into his own hands by tumbling, contorting his body, doing one-handed pushups and lovingly pelting the audience with heavily salted snack treats.

While on stage, he's like a big happy kid who’s doing exactly what he's always wanted to do and his show is as if the Little Rascal’s grew up, stayed together and became hilarious adults. Read the rest

Halt and Catch Fire: The Most Relevant Show on Television is Set in the 80s

With the cacophony of an election year ablaze with unparalleled drama being fought on the front lines of Twitter, we find ourselves slowing down and staring at it like a bad accident. The need for escapist relief is perhaps more dire than usual right now. This fall, if it's drama you crave, but the Hillary v. Trump show is driving you to near-suicide, then the AMC series Halt and Catch Fire is your new best friend. Returning for its third season on Tuesday, August 23rd with a two-hour premiere, you'll still get your fix of intriguing plot twists, flawed personalities, and high stakes, but without the partisan tantrums and pre-apocalyptic anxiety.

What the Hell is this Show About?

The show's title refers to the computing term (HCF), "Halt and Catch Fire," an early technical command that sends a computer into race condition, forcing all instructions to compete for superiority at once. Control of the computer could not be regained. The namesake series takes place in the personal computing boom of the 80s, when IBM was dictator, and before "website" was a word. Though HCF is categorized as a "workplace drama," you could say the same thing about Breaking Bad, and you'd be completely missing the point--and the thrill--of both shows.

To "break bad" is a colloquialism used in the American South meaning to challenge authority. Breaking Bad and HCF have three important things in common: obscure, nondescript titles that run the risk of losing potential viewers who need their plot summaries spoon-fed and hashtagged, a committed, forward-thinking home on AMC Networks, and the consistently visionary TV producer Melissa Bernstein. Read the rest

Miss Cleo dead at 53

TMZ reports that Miss Cleo is dead at 53. The TV psychic, also known as Youree Harris, was famous for the character's faux-Jamaican accent and the bizarre Tarot-themed advertising campaigns exhorting Americans to call in for a reading.

You couldn't fool Miss Cleo, went the catchy 90s' tagline, but the entertainer could not fool the FTC, either: her Psychic Readers Network collapsed after the government charged it with deceptive advertising, billing and collection practices. Harris went on to perform as an actress and a spokesperson.

"It's the one who is really unpleasant. That's the daddy." Read the rest

Cosplay at the 2016 San Diego Comic-Con International: 10 amazing fan portraits

San Diego Comic-Con International has concluded for 2016, but these amazing photos of dedicated cosplayers at the event will live on.

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