Boing Boing 

Ellen Pao: “The trolls are winning.”

ellenpao

“I have just endured one of the largest trolling attacks in history,” writes Reddit's recently-departed interim CEO Ellen Pao in a Washington Post op-ed today. “And I have just been blessed with the most astonishing human responses to that attack.”

Read the rest

Australian woman imprisoned in Abu Dhabi for Facebook post

Did you know that if you post a photo of a car parked across two disabled spaces in Abu Dhabi you can go to prison for “writing bad words about a person?” Jodi Magi, 39, did not know that. The Australian woman posted the photo to her Facebook page and even obscured the license plate number on the car. But that didn't matter to authorities. She was fined $2,700 and offered to pay, but when she tried to leave the country Abu Dhabi authorities turned down the offer and insisted that she go to court.

At this point she was arrested and taken away in a police van.

"No one's talking to me. No one's telling me what's going on," she told the Australian broadcaster, ABC, from the back of the van.

“They were about to put me in male lock-up and then they turned me away and no one knows what to do with me. I'm pretty scared."

It is still unclear how long Ms Magi will remain in custody.

What do you bet the car in the photo belongs to a powerful person in Abu Dhabi? But, it's good you're locking up Jodi, Your Honor. A real good thing. And tomorrow... tomorrow's gonna be a... real good day!

NZ's anti-troll law: gift to trolls, bad for free speech


If you set out to create the platonic ideal of a badly considered anti-trolling bill that made a bunch of ineffectual gestures at ending harassment without regard to the collateral damage on everything else on the Internet, well, you'd be New Zealand's Parliament, apparently.

Read the rest

After lying and covering up, Facebook finally changes rules for inmates' pages


After at least four years of lying about its rubberstamp takedown process for prison authorities and omitting prison takedowns from its transparency reports, Facebook is finally bringing a crumb of due process to its treatment of prisoners.

Read the rest

Atlanta pays $20,000 to critic forced to post pro-cop message to Facebook

Atlanta police Lt. Jeffrey Cantin told Baton Bob, a street performer, that he wouldn't be released on Bond unless he posted complementary remarks about the Atlanta police department to his Facebook page.

Read the rest

Comics Connector: matching comics professionals with teachers/librarians for visits

Charles from the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund writes, "Comic Book Legal Defense Fund continues the celebration of Children's Book Week by launching its newest resource -- the Comics Connector, a directory that connects educators and librarians with comics professionals who are able to provide classroom/library visits."

Sony sends pre-emptive threat letter to journalists


A lawyer retained by Sony has sent threat-letters to media outlets hinting at repercussions if they report on material in the huge dump of internal Sony docs from the North Korea hack that Wikileaks put online.

Read the rest

Clean Reader is a free speech issue


My latest Guardian column, Allow Clean Reader to swap 'bad' words in books – it's a matter of free speech expands on last week's editorial about the controversial ebook reader, which lets readers mangle the books they read by programatically swapping swear-words for milder alternatives.

Read the rest

I hate your censorship, but I'll defend to the death your right to censor

An app called Clean Reader lets silly bluenoses swap swear words out of the ebooks they read, an idea I hate: but I hate the idea that anyone can tell me how to read even more.Read the rest

Freedom of speech is now compulsory


A timely reminder from Scarfolk town council.

Kenya's Parliament erupts into chaos as government rams through brutal "anti-terrorism" law

MPs shredded their papers and threw them, and got into fistfights with one another over the new law, which allows the government to imprison suspects for 360 days without charge, and to fine press outlets millions for publishing articles "likely to cause fear or alarm" (this term is not defined in the statute).

Read the rest

Georgia cops pay $100K for jailing woman who said "Fuck the police"


Amy Barnes was jailed and held in solitary in 2012 when she called out "fuck the police" as she bicycled past Cobb County cops who were questioning a suspect by the roadside.

Read the rest

San Francisco's Monkeybrains ISP offering gigabit home wireless connections


It's $35/month for the service, from San Francisco's coolest indie ISP (founded by Rudy Rucker's son, Rudy Jr, it was the inspiration for Pigspleen, the fictional ISP in my novel Little Brother) and if you opt to pay a little extra, they'll install a free link in a low/medium income neighborhood, too.

Read the rest

Pennsylvania passes a "Gag Mumia" law to silence prisoner's voices

The "Revictimization Relief Act" allows suits against offenders whose "conduct...perpetuates the continuing effect of the crime on the victim," but the fact that it was aimed at silencing jailed activist Mumia Abu-Jamal was never made a secret -- the governor signed it into law saying that it "was inspired by the excesses and pious hypocrisy of one particular killer."

Read the rest

Popehat's #Gamergate rants

Former federal prosecutor, free speech advocate and generally smart dude Ken "Popehat" White has posted "ten short rants" about #Gamergate, which, surprisingly, contain nuance and gloss I haven't yet encountered in the verbiage devoted to the subject elsewhere.

Read the rest

Australian bill will put journos in prison for 10 years for reporting leaks

The bill was introduced on Wednesday by Attorney General George Brandis, and it gives the Australian Security Intelligence Organisation the power to imprison leakers (including reporters) for five years, with ten year sentences for anything regarding "special intelligence operations" (illegal spy operations conducted under promise of immunity).

Read the rest

Indexing pages that Google must hide from Europeans


The controversial "right to be forgotten" European court ruling has Google removing embarrassing (and worse) search results from search-results served in the EU.

Read the rest