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The mysterious Face on Mars was first spotted in 1959

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Comic master Jack Kirby showed us the mysterious "Face on Mars" decades before it was imaged by the Viking 1 orbiter in 1976 and ultimately became an iconic example of pareidolia or proof of an ancient civilization on the red planet.

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Cassini captures strange red arcs on Saturn's moon Tethys

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Researchers created this enhanced-color image by compositing recent shots of Tethys taken by Cassini. Current top hypotheses for the unusual red arcs are:

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Watching a sphere of water bubble in space in 4K resolution: Yup, pretty cool

A water bubble with the remnants of an antacid tablet reaction floats in front of astronaut Terry Virts’ eye. The reaction of putting the effervescent tablet into the water was filmed with the Red Epic Dragon Camera.

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Dark Side of the Pluto

'shooped by Xeni.


'shooped by Xeni.

Just made this quick 'shoop of the first thing that came into my head when I saw this amazing Pluto image from the NASA New Horizons mission.

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How to name an exoplanet, by XKCD

Randall Munroe has a hot take on the recent space news around Kepler 452-B and Pluto.

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NASA unveils gorgeous new false-color image of Pluto

NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI


NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI

It may be 'shopped, and we can tell by the pixels, but it's just the most beautiful image of Pluto mankind has ever seen. It's also 2.2 km/pixel, and the most detailed ever.

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NASA completes rocket design review for future Mars journey

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NASA's new Space Launch System (SLS) is about to go into full-scale fabrication after a detailed review. SLS Block 1, which just passed a design review milestone, will go to an asteroid placed in lunar orbit, and eventually to Mars.

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First near-Earth-size planet in “habitable zone” around sun-like star confirmed by NASA

Space truth, more awesome than fiction.Read the rest

WATCH: Neil deGrasse Tyson give us a a brief history of everything

Neil deGrasse Tyson tell us how it is.

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As we marveled at Pluto, this spectacular comet image came out

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While we were busy enjoying the spectacular images of Pluto, ESA's Rosetta camera released this image of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

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A new, EPIC view of planet Earth from NASA satellite aboard the Deep Space Climate Observatory spacecraft

Earth as seen on July 6, 2015 from a distance of one million miles by a NASA scientific camera aboard the Deep Space Climate Observatory spacecraft. Image: NASA


Earth as seen on July 6, 2015 from a distance of one million miles by a NASA scientific camera aboard the Deep Space Climate Observatory spacecraft. Image: NASA

A NASA camera on the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) satellite has returned its first view of the entire sunlit side of Earth from one million miles away.

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National Geographic's Pluto issue, autographed by NASA's New Horizons team

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Susan Goldberg: “How cool is this? The @NASANewHorizons #Pluto team autographed our fab July @NatGeo cover, written by @nadiamdrake.”

More: Pluto coverage on Boing Boing.

Pluto fly-by immortalized in 4 perfect frames by Cyanide & Happiness webcomic

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A wonderful “Aww, poor Pluto” take by webcomic creator Rob DenBleyker. Link. Won't someone think of the poor exoplanets?

This little cartoon captures all of Pluto's lonely feels, as New Horizons probe flys by

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Aww. Poor little Pluto.

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NASA's New Horizons spacecraft phones home from Pluto, and all is “nominal”

“We are in lock with telemetry on the spacecraft,” operations manager Alice Bowman said at the New Horizons Mission Operations Center.


“We are in lock with telemetry on the spacecraft,” operations manager Alice Bowman said at the New Horizons Mission Operations Center.

Cheers and clapping at the Mission Operations Center (MOC), where the New Horizons spacecraft signal was received.


Cheers and clapping at the Mission Operations Center (MOC), as the New Horizons spacecraft signal was received.

NASA TV is broadcasting confirmation that a signal has been received from the New Horizons spacecraft, which just flew as close to Pluto as it's going to get on a decades-long trip. This is the first ever flyby of Pluto in human history.

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NASA Ground team stands by for Pluto fly-by confirmation signal from New Horizons

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NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft is expected to radio home any minute now. We're watching on NASA TV. The moment will end a nearly 22-hour radio blackout as the probe focused on a series of close-up observations of Pluto and its moons.

From SpaceFlight Now:

Engineers expect to lock on to a carrier signal, then start receiving housekeeping data on the status of the New Horizons spacecraft. No science data will come down during Tuesday night’s pass.

“The reason why you’re not seeing more things immediately is because the spacecraft is spending all its time making the observations of the Pluto system,” says Hal Weaver, New Horizons’ project sciences from the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland. “That’s what we wanted to do. Of course, you want to optimize the scientific return from the mission.

A signal from New Horizons will be a celebratory moment for the hundreds of engineers and scientists working on the mission. The cessation of communications was part of the plan going into the flyby because New Horizons carries a fixed antenna, meaning mission managers have to choose between contacting Earth and conducting scientific work at Pluto.

Watch live: Ground team standing by for New Horizons signal

Clyde William Tombaugh (February 4, 1906 – January 17, 1997) was an American astronomer. Although he is best known for discovering the dwarf planet Pluto in 1930.


Clyde William Tombaugh (February 4, 1906 – January 17, 1997) was an American astronomer. Although he is best known for discovering the dwarf planet Pluto in 1930.

Pluto and other known “not-planets” in our solar system mapped in scale image montage

Montage by Emily Lakdawalla.


Montage by Emily Lakdawalla.

“Now that I have a reasonable-resolution global color view of Pluto,” writes Emily Lakdawalla, “I can drop it into one of my trademark scale image montages, to show you how it fits in with the rest of the similar-sized worlds in the solar system: the major moons and the biggest asteroids.”

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