"elizabeth warren"

Elizabeth Warren's brother dies of coronavirus

Senator Elizabeth Warren said today that her brother, Don Reed, died Tuesday of coronavirus.

"What made him extra special was his smile—quick and crooked," Warren wrote on Twitter. "It always seemed to generate its own light, one that lit up everyone around him."

Reed, who joined the US Air Force at 19 and served in Vietnam, is one of about 47,000 Americans reported to have died so far in the Covid-19 pandemic. Warren recently ended her campaign to become the Democratic Party's candidate in this year's presidential election, and remains a potential VP pick going into November's poll.

Photo courtesy Sen. Warren. Read the rest

Senators to U.S. Ethics Official: 'Ensure COVID-19 Decisions Serve the American Public, Not President Trump's & Jared Kushner's Financial Interests'

Senators Elizabeth Warren, Richard Blumenthal, and Thomas R. Carper have sent a letter to the White House Designated Agency Ethics Official, titled 'Ensure COVID-19 Decisions Serve the American Public, Not President Trump's & Jared Kushner's Financial Interests. Read the rest

Warren endorses Biden

Elizabeth Warren today backed Joe Biden as the Democratic Party's candidate in the 2020 presidential election, capping a three-day endorsement extravaganza featuring former rival Bernie Sanders and president Barack Obama.
"Empathy matters. And, in this moment of crisis, it's more important than ever that the next president restores Americans' faith in good, effective government," Warren says. "Joe Biden has spent nearly his entire life in public service. He knows that a government run with integrity, competence, and heart will save lives and save livelihoods. And we can't afford to let Donald Trump continue to endanger the lives and livelihoods of every American.""That's why I'm proud to endorse Joe Biden as president of the United States," she added.
Read the rest

Elizabeth Warren quits race

Democratic candidate Elizabeth Warren is dropping out of the race to challenge President Trump in november's general election. After a disappointing Super Tuesday saw Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders split the lions' share of delegates, no path to the nomination remained for the last woman in contention.

It leaves what was once a historically diverse Democratic field essentially narrowed to two white men in their seventies. Sanders is 78 and Biden is 77.

The trajectory of the race has rapidly shifted in recent days, with Biden gaining momentum in the contests that voted on Super Tuesday. Biden won at least 10 states on Tuesday, a dramatic turnaround for a candidacy that very recently looked doomed.

Warren’s dismal showing the same day included a third-place result in her own state of Massachusetts, which Biden won, and where she finished five percentage points behind the Vermont independent Sanders.

In an interview last night with Rachel Maddow, Sanders repudiated supporters who attacked Warren and said he'd "love to sit down and talk to her about what kind of role she could pay in our administration.” Read the rest

Biden wins most Super Tuesday states; Sanders takes California

Joe Biden took most of the states voting yesterday for a Democratic candidate to challenge President Trump, including an unexpected win in Texas. Rival Bernie Sanders, however, overwhelmed Biden in California to grab the night's biggest haul of delegates. The results confirm the scale of Biden's comeback, which kicked off with a big win last week in South Carolina, and suggest a two-man slog for the job.

For his $500m+ investment, billionaire Mike Bloomberg won a single race -- American Samoa -- and indicated that his vanity campaign might soon be over. Elizabeth Warren could only manage third place in Massachussets, trailing across the map.

With many close races, Biden and Sanders nonetheless split the haul between them. According to the BBC, with several races yet to declare, Biden has 453 convention delegates, Sanders 382, Warren 50 and Bloomberg 44. Read the rest

Michael Bloomberg wins "First in the Nation" primary in Dixville Notch, New Hampshire

For 60 years, the itty-bitty town of Dixville Notch, New Hampshire has cast some of the very first ballots of the presidential primary election at The Balsams resort. The town's five registered voters cast their ballots at midnight and former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg was the surprise winner with 3 write-in ballots; 2 from Democrats and 1 from a Republican. Bernie Sanders and Pete Buttigeig each received 1 vote.

Two other teeny towns, Hart's Location and Millsfield, also voted at midnight. In Hart's Location, Sen. Amy Klobuchar came in first with 6 votes, followed by Sen. Elizabeth Warren with 4, Andrew Yang with 3, Sanders with 2, and former VP Joe Biden, Tom Steyer, and Tulsi Gabbard with 1 each. Impeached President Donald Trump received 15 votes on the Republican side, and former MA governor Bill Weld and Concord resident Mary Maxwell each received 1.

Klobuchar won again in Millsfield, capturing 2 votes and Buttigieg, Biden, and Sanders each receiving 1 vote. Trump also won Millsfield with 15 votes.

That put Amy Klobuchar in first place in New Hampshire, followed by a tie for second place between Warren and Sanders. The rest of the state will vote today and most polls will close at 7:00 PM.

If you're looking to kill some time before results start coming in, I highly recommend the podcast "Stranglehold" from New Hampshire Public Radio. It's a deep dive into how New Hampshire became the first state in the nation to vote and if it deserves to keep that distinction. Read the rest

Elizabeth Warren already has a dog

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dXJXepAMWAo

Senator Warren doesn't need Mike Pence, she has a dog. Read the rest

Sanders declares victory in Iowa caucus as final results trail in

Bernie Sanders today declared victory in Iowa's bungled headcount of Democratic voters, with the latest results putting him neck-and-neck with Pete Buttigieg. It was already clear he had the most votes, but Iowa Democrats' abstruse "caucus math" had awarded Buttigieg an advantage in delegates earlier in the count.

"With 97 percent of precincts now reporting, the results showed South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg with 26.2 percent of state delegate equivalents and Sanders with 26.1 percent," reported The Hill's Kyle Balluck. "Sanders, however, is leading in the final alignment votes tally, though the share of delegates is considered the most important metric of the Iowa results."

When asked why he was declaring victory despite the neck-and-neck delegate count, he told reporters "because I got 6,000 more votes."

In any case, both candidates did well on the night, with Elizabeth Warren running a close third. But it was a "gut punch" for supposed front-runner Joe Biden, trailing a distant fourth. Read the rest

Buttigieg claims delegate lead in Iowa caucus, with Sanders leading vote, Warren close behind, and Biden in the dust

With only 62% of precincts reporting in, Bernie Sanders has 28,220 votes in the Iowa Democratic Party caucus, followed closely by Pete Buttigieg on 27,030 and then Elizabeth Warren with 22,254. Joe Biden trails a distant fourth on 14,176 votes, only a little ahead of Amy Klobuchar.

Buttigieg, however, has more delegates pledged in the complicated and suddenly very controversial caucus, according to CNN.

After a long night and full day of rancor, confusion and anger over delayed caucus results, the Iowa Democratic Party offered the first round of official results at 5 p.m. EST.

With more than a third of precincts still to report in, the winner is still anyone's guess. But Sanders and especially Buttigieg can be happy with the result. With the vote so divided, Warren's strong third will be a relief to her supporters.

Biden's dismal fourth, however, is the first real sign of trouble for his campaign, otherwise atop opinion polls nationwide in the race to become the Democratic challenger to Trump in the 2020 general election.

Most of the problems stemmed from a caucus reporting app that failed catastrophically on the night. Read the rest

Why aren't more conservatives concerned about felon voting rights?

I've been a huge fan of Elizabeth Warren since I saw her yelling at a cop during the 2012 Boston Pride Parade. I generally think that her past history as a Republican should actually be a selling point, as it demonstrates her capacity to examine the available evidence and change her mind. But one place where Bernie still stands out in front is his willingness to extend voting rights to people who are incarcerated.

I'm not surprised that Warren is hesitant to go all the way in allowing people to vote while still incarcerated — after all, unexamined biases against incarcerated people are extremely common — but I am disappointed.

The more I thought about it, however, I began to consider how strange it is that felon voting rights (during or after incarceration) tend to be such a partisan issue. As a progressive, I've come around to understand why it matters, as all human rights matter, particularly in an unjust legal system. As much as I hate it, I can at least understand the true authoritarian racist argument in favor of retaining free labor through a loophole-by-design of the 13th Amendment.

But when I think about the conservatives I know, and the philosophies they claim to adhere to, that's where the contradictions arise. For example, let's ignore the contrived veneer respectability that shines on every deceptive video from PragerU, and take their argumentative claims at face value and in good faith. PragerU pumps out plenty of content defending the Electoral College by rationalizing it around a fear of mob rule, or the "tyranny of the majority." Read the rest

Bernie Sanders is the most popular candidate among young people, who could determine the outcome of the 2020 election

The largest political party in America is the None of the Above Party, which garners more support than either the Democrats or the Republicans: that means that motivating eligible voters to go to the polls matters more than anything else when it comes to determining the outcome of federal elections. Read the rest

Bernie Sanders leads Iowa Poll for the first time, just weeks before Iowa Caucus

NEW Des Moines Register/CNN/Mediacom Iowa Poll shows 20% of likely Democratic caucusgoers name Sanders as their first choice for president.

U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders is leading the Iowa Poll for the first time, and just 3 weeks remain before the Iowa caucuses. Read the rest

RIP, Mike Resnick

Mike Resnick, a major figure in science fiction, has died after a brief battle with "a very aggressive form of lymphoma" that was diagnosed in November. He was 77. Read the rest

Bernie Sanders is the only leading Democrat who hasn't taken money from billionaires

Bernie Sanders' record-setting fundraising isn't just notable for how much he raised, it's also notable for how he raised it -- Sanders is the only leading candidate in the Democratic leadership race for 2020 who hasn't taken any money from billionaires. Read the rest

Citing the Panama Papers, Elizabeth Warren proposes sweeping anti-financial-secrecy rules

The whistleblowers who brought us The Paradise Papers and The Panama Papers risked their freedom and even their lives (Maltese journalist Daphne Caruana Galizia was assassinated for reporting on the stories). Years later, financial secrecy havens are still on the rise, and it's easy to think that all that blood and treasure thrown at ending money laundering and corruption was wasted. Read the rest

Private equity firms should be abolished

In his latest BIG newsletter, Matt Stoller (previously) relates the key moments in the history of private equity, from its roots in the notorious "leveraged buyouts" of the 1980s, and explains exactly how the PE con works: successful, productive business are acquired through debt financing, drained of their cash and assets, and then killed, leaving workers unemployed and with their pension funds looted, and with the business's creditors out in the cold. Read the rest

Bernie Sanders has a “High-Speed Internet for All” plan, $150 billion for public broadband

Senator and 2020 US presidential candidate Bernie Sanders' “High-Speed Internet For All” plan, unveiled today, promises $150 billion to build publicly owned broadband networks -- and to break the chokehold that Comcast, Verizon, and AT&T have on Americans' access to information and communication. Read the rest

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